How much does a good cattle fence cost to have erected?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by oz in SC, Mar 1, 2005.

  1. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    I am trying to get all the costs of various elements of the future homestead on paper and was wondering what are the various costs of fencing.

    I know different parts of the country have different costs but it still will help with an idea.

    Thanks oz.
     
  2. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    High tensle 3 wire on wide open fairly level ground can be put up pretty cheaply with posts 50 feet apart and a cheap stay or 2. Makes a great pasture fence for cattle.

    Combo cattle panels with wooden posts on 8 foot centers with 2 strands of barbed on top, one electric, makes real good yard fence for a wide varaity of critters, but costs an arm and a leg you wouldn't believe.

    There are different types in between with woven wire & barbed top wire(s). Fencing in hills & valleys ups the cost quite a bit over level land, and rocky ground also increases the aggrivation & cost.

    So, what is the terrain, & what are you trying to fence in, and is this a buttoned up tight yard area or a less intensive pasture area? You can spend 3-7 times as much on one type over the other....

    --->Paul
     

  3. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    It is rolling terrain and I would like to one day(in the future) have longhorn cattle....for some reason. :D

    It would be the perimeter fencing at this time....
     
  4. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    I think you can expect to pay between $3.00 and $6.00 per linear foot (installed) for a 5-wire BW fence with steel t-posts, depending on how much fencing you need, terrain, and soil type. Add about $150 for each gate. This assumes, of course, that there are no trees or brush in the way.
     
  5. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    Thanks,that is what I am trying to find out.

    I am going to call acompany up in NC and get a rough estimate so this will help.
     
  6. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    Steves about right also cost in corner post properly done they would be about the same as a gate thats if the gate post are done right.


    mikell
     
  7. hairy_shemp

    hairy_shemp Member

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    a good fence is priceless
     
  8. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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  9. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    I spent $1,000 for material for 1,300 feet of fence,thats Steel T Post,Woven Wire,with 2 strands of Barb Wire over the top.Used Rock Corner Post and Cattle Panels for Gates.We have lots of Wildfires around here.The fence is Hog tight,won't rot or burn.

    big rockpile
     
  10. milkstoolcowboy

    milkstoolcowboy Farmer

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    I guess this depends on what your definition of "good" is. For a line fence (perimeter fence), I'd want it to be long-lasting and low-maintenance. Typically, the rules on line or boundary fence is that adjoining property owners have to do this 50/50 on a shared boundary.

    Here's what I'd look at: 5" by 8' treated wood posts spaced on 12' center, 4 8" by 8' (or longer) treated wood corner posts, 16 5" by 8' treated wood posts and steel braces for building the corner posts (+ a roll of no. 9 wire and twist sticks), 32" high woven wire (12.5 gauge, hinge joint, 8 wire and 6" check), three strands of 12.5 gauge 2-barb barb wire, and galvanized staples (approx 20 lbs). Throw in 4 16' heavy steel tube gates.

    Materials cost for this fence (based on my calcs, prices in my area) are $1.85 per foot. Cost inclusive of labor is $2.80 per foot, figuring labor at $15.00 per hour.

    You'll need to build a corral or similar handling facility for the cattle. For this, I'd recommend 16' cattle panels with 5" by 8' treated wood posts on 4' centers with two treated 2" by 6" on top, a cattle waterer, some more 2" by 6" or cattle gates and posts to funnel into a head gate or squeeze chute. You could spend $2000-2500 for this easily and a lot more if you poured a pad of concrete and bought a fancy squeeze chute. Those longhorns are a pain to work through conventional gates/chutes.

    You could save yourself an awful lot of money if you built the fence yourself and used second-hand posts, barb wire and buy gates and waterers second-hand. I've seen good steel T-posts sell for $0.25/post, good treated 5" by 8' wood posts sell from $2-$5/post, cattle panels used sell for $3-$8/panel, and guys give away rolls of used barb wire and woven wire, but used woven wire can be a pain to work with. (I'm assuming you have post-hole diggers, post-hole driver, etc.

    A good fence is a good investment. I've never heard anyone say their fence was too well-built.
     
  11. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    I'm putting in 5 strand high-tensile on our North pasture this spring. I've ordered 300 8.5 foot locust posts that will be spaced 12 foot apart. I already have 8 (I'm only using 4 on this pasture) gates (with hardware) that I had picked up used a couple years ago.

    Price on the posts is $3.25 a piece but almost half of them are large enough for corner posts. Several people told me I could split them but I figure I'd rather have a fence that is a bit more solid. Because the guy (neighbor) taht was going to help me put them in has some issues and might not be able to haul them (he is a trucker), I may have to pay someone to haul them.

    I have not priced the high tensile wire and fittings (standoffs, ratchets,etc).

    Mike
     
  12. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Oz, if you're thinking longhorns, you might want to remember that they can jump like deer. milkstoolcowboy's figures are darned close to what I would have given you.

    milkstoolcowboy, we use more specialized equipment now but when we were starting out, we found that those old longhorn cows can get their horns through anything they want, they secret is allowing them time to figure the whole thing out and to know that if they figure they are stuck or in a bind, they will almost always raise their heads. With that in mind, we have good luck with scissor headgates.
     
  13. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    I REALLY appreciate all the replies,it helps to get a handle on the various costs.

    As we have 17 acres total and about a third of that will be other uses we should have about 11 acres of pasture.

    I didn't get time to call the fencing co. up in NC,been tearing down the old deck off the back of the house-got a deal on a new wooden deck that will actually improve the house.LOL.