HOw much does a baby cow cost?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by OD, Apr 20, 2005.

  1. OD

    OD Well-Known Member

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    You can get them pretty cheap at an auction sometimes, but there is a reason for that. Calf traders know how to doctor up a calf that is nearly dead so it will last just long enough for an unsuspecting buyer to get it home before it dies. If you are lucky enough to get one that isn't already sick, it will catch something while it is at the sale that wil kill it unless you spend more than you probably gave for the calf trying to save it.
    Buying calves at a sale is a bad idea.
     
  2. woolyfluff

    woolyfluff Well-Known Member

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    WE HAVE OTTEN CALVES FOR AS LTTLE FOR FREE AND THEN THEIR TIMES WHEN THEY GOT FOR AS $250.00 for a week old animals and that is here inPA
     

  3. Jess

    Jess Member

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    I have bought 4 baby calves from the market here in wv. ALL OF THEM DIED!!!! So now we buy them from individuals. Its not a good idea to buy them from the market unless you know people there that will be honest to you and know who brough the babies in and know that they are not deathy ill, OD is right some people know how to make the calves seem fine, if you do get one from the market, and you have also bought one from an individual, DON"T PUT THE MARKET CALF WITH IT.
     
  4. shelljo

    shelljo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    And don't buy a feedlot calf. They usually die also--due to the hormones in the feed.

    We got one (free) that did live, but its mother had only been in the lot for 2 days and had come off pasture. That was a very rare circumstance.
     
  5. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    As I understand it, "One buys calves at market on Monday, dopes them in the barn on Wednesday, and buries them in the back forty on Friday."
     
  6. AnnB

    AnnB Member

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    People can say what they want about salebarn calves, I've had GREAT luck with them. I've bought dozens over the years and never had one die from disease (one did aspirate his milk and was butchered before he could sicken and die).
    Had a couple develop scours, but that's easily dealt with.

    You've got to look the calves over closely before you buy. Never buy a calf that's already scouring, never buy a calf who's eyes are sunken, and never buy a calf that won't suck your fingers. The best calves to buy at the salebarn are the newborns that are being sent through as pairs with the old broken-mouthed cows, usually when they get them in the ring they'll sell the cow by the pound and sell the calf separately. These calves will always be in better shape than the bottlecalves because they've been on their mama right up until they're sold.

    Always keep new arrivals separate from your own animals, care for them last, and change clothing before going back to your own, for at least a week (preferrably two) to make sure that they don't bring in any diseases with them.

    Prices can range from $10 to several hundred. The most I personally have ever paid for a newborn calf (Red Whiteface bull, straight off a broken-mouthed Black cow) was $150.

    Ann B
     
  7. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What does "broken-mouthed" mean?
     
  8. randiliana

    randiliana Guest

    Broken-Mouth means she has lost all or most of her teeth due to old age. These cows are normally 8 years +.

    We raise beef cattle and have 150 momma cows.I would NEVER buy a calf from auction, sometimes you get lucky, but usually they have something wrong with them. Scours, cleft palate, won't suck.......... Seen them all there!!

    And as for scours, depends what kind the animal has. If it is a bacterial scour, it is easy to treat, but if it is viral it can be (and usually is) deadly, and it can spread like wildfire if you get it.

    Randi
     
  9. AnnB

    AnnB Member

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    Viral scours will run its course, IF the calf is given good supportive care and kept hydrated. Most calves die of dehydration, not the problem that caused it.

    Ann B
     
  10. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Dehydration is the biggest killer with scours no doubt, imagine ****ing water out where its not supposed to, you too would loose fluids fast. Humans can dehydrate as well if they kept on ****ing out the grits.


    But to each his own, I personally would prefer an individual, and some farms sell them as if it was a barn, as they have toooo many. It is also nice to deal with the owner, ask questions and you can get some good backround info. You can see other animals as well. I know what can go through the barn, we sent a bull calf, it was almost a year or so, it was a dwarf. Called it a calf, and received 1.00lb. Same reason why I wouldn't go through a sale barn, never know what can go through. Sure it might not be honest, thing is, I did get something for it, and was surprised what I got.



    Jeff
     
  11. Hovey Hollow

    Hovey Hollow formerly hovey1716

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    We bought a calf from an auction yesterday.
    I tried for weeks to find a calf to buy directly from a farmer. I knew all that we would be able to afford was a bottle calf, and we want the experience anyway. There are never any calves in the paper, only $1000+ cows and bulls. I checked to BB of a couple of feed stores and didn't see anything but horses and goats, etc. How does someone who is new to the area find a calf?
    I thought that the dairy bulls would end up being the least expensive, but at the auction we went to the beef calves were actually going for less so we got an Angus (he's black anyway). He appears very healthy, shiny coat, bright eyes, no scours, straight back, etc. He resisted the bottle for his first couple of feedings, finally got the hang of it today. I'm guessing he is a couple of weeks old. Being a beef breed I am assuming his mom died or rejected him. As good as he looks I am also assuming he got colostrum and was on mom for a while. We got him for $170. I am standing by with electrolytes, antibiotics, etc. What amazed me was that some calves that were obviously sick were going for $140-$150. One calf looked good, but when I was watching her before the auction she was coughing. She went for $300. My husband and I looked like the only ones there that weren't pretty experienced at all this, so what are these old guys thinking? I am a vet tech so I'm pretty experienced at what a sick (zoo) animal looks like, but I figure cattlemen should know better than me what a sick calf looks like.
     
  12. jerzeygurl

    jerzeygurl woolgathering

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    Just sold my lovely auction bought angus bull for $1.56 a pound at 300# at auction. couldnt be happier.