How much can a 1/2 ton p.up haul?

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by nans31, Mar 8, 2005.

  1. nans31

    nans31 Well-Known Member

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    Can I safely haul a ton of bagged feed in my Ford 1985 1/2 ton pick up (f 150)? I am hauling 1/2 ton at a time, but want to get a ton from now on. I don't have the manual to tell me the weight limits, does anyone have an opinion on this?
     
  2. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    It all depends on engine size, cab style (reg, supercab, supercrew), 4x2 or 4x4, wheelbase, suspension type (reg or heavy-duty), transmission, etc. But the range of payload (based on factory specs) is anywheres from 1500 to 2000 pounds.
     

  3. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    About 3200 pounds is a full load for most (American made, older) 1/2 ton pick ups. When loaded there needs to be 'bounce' still avaibable in the rear springs. I have loaded 6,000 pounds on an older Ford 1 ton, dual tires.
     
  4. Ed K

    Ed K Well-Known Member

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    This is NOT a reccomendation... but when hauling stone or mulch from the landscape supply in my 4 cylinder 1/2 ton toyota PU The loader operator usually fills the truck to his satisfaction and looks at me like "any more?" I used to say yes but discovered when I hit the scales to pay that I was routinely filling the truck to the 3/4 ton mark or even the 1 ton mark. I could move the load but the steering is a little touchier than normal, the stopping distance is much longer and I have a tendency to rip off the mudflaps when backing up over a hump. But otherwise it's possible. Friends of mine have been pulled over and ticketed by the police for having and overloaded vehicles.

    Now I've learned to talk to the operator who's loading me. I'll tell him the weight I want and then tell him to use his judgement when I'm there. He usually guesses a lot closer than I do.
     
  5. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    just remember payload includes passengers!!! if you have hills or slippery conditions then reduce payload. ifthe truck is in good shape get a tandem utility trailer with brakes and put 3/4 load in the trailer 1/4 on the truck.have seen trucks with insane loads just waiting for the cops to tag them !!!always play safe!! under loading and lashing the load well hurts no one. truck that old you start to see frame weakness and other wear. if it were my 2004 i would be leary of hauling a ton even though we have in the past with our old trucks(cops wern't so pickyor the insurance)
     
  6. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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  7. Ozarks_1

    Ozarks_1 Well-Known Member

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    It can be done, but "hauling" that ton of feed is one thing ... "STOPPING" is something else entirely!
    Could you stop that truck in time if faced with a "panic stop" situation like a child darting into the road in front of you, for example?

    In addition, stress factors on the truck's frame should be taken into consideration if you plan to keep the truck for any amount of time. Many trucks, especially later-models, simply can't take much overloading ("abuse") before their frames start to develop stress cracks.

    FWIW - I once accidently overloaded my '73 Chevy 1/2-ton 4x4 with 7,000 lbs (crushed rock)! The rear suspension never sagged; the 31x10.50R15 tirs never bulged; the steering felt fine; the truck was somewhat harder to stop than usual - but the trip was only a mile down our gravel road. If "Bambi" had jumped out in front of me, I would have had venison. :eek:
     
  8. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    1/2 ton pickups in my opinion are just worst of both worlds. Crappy gas mileage and low hauling capacity. Overload them even with helper springs and they handle like crap. If you haul relatively light loads get a mini pickup and hire or rent heavier truck for occasional use. Haul lot heavy loads get 3/4 ton or 1 ton truck. Even short 1 1/2 ton if your states DMV doesnt screw you over royally for licensing it. Heavier frame truck will handle much better under full load.
     
  9. unioncreek

    unioncreek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When I had my 77 F150 I would haul a ton of hay every week when I bought hay. I have hauled more than than. We also had a 78 F150 with the 300 six in it we pulled a 30 grain drill trailer with the grain drill loaded. We never weighed it, but it had to have well over a ton on the hitch.

    I wouldn't routinely haul a ton, but if you buy feed once a month or so I wouldn't be too concerned about it.

    BobG
     
  10. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Saw 1 out in Cali last month pulling a semi-tractor at hyway speeds 55 mph in Cali that is not the norm though,try the Library they might have a book telling the limits
     
  11. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    No.

    BooBoo
     
  12. nans31

    nans31 Well-Known Member

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    Good info... thanks guys. I think I'll make other arrangements..... I need to go thru Portland, Or on the interstate where speed is 65-70 mph, not that I plan on going that fast, but traffic is horrendous, and stopping is a concern. I have decided that I need to look into a larger pick up to haul what I plan on hauling (safely).
    nan
     
  13. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    Good choice!
     
  14. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    trailer with brakes means you don't have to up grade a good truck. if you are only hauling a ton then a tandem trailer with surge or electric brakes would not be out of this world.
     
  15. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    I wouldn't have a problem with it,I've hauled two big round Bales of Hay at a time on both mine.Hauled 2 Ton Feed never took it off the pallet just take Forklift load it right on.

    Had a 3/4 Flatbed Ford one time,I would haul 2 cords of green Pulp Wood at a time,put it on the scales just to check the weight,shade less than 13,000 pounds :eek: :haha:

    big rockpile
     
  16. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    But when you hit and injure/kill my family because you cant stop, you WILL then have a problem.
     
  17. george darby

    george darby Well-Known Member

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    keep the bulk of the load toward the front of the bed helps my ford ranger was alwas good about handling but the dodge dakota was alwayspoor handling when loaded you should be able to judge how much of a load you can handle ........ do not be a fred sanford and place wood blocks on the axle...... so you can keep loading...... seen it done .....unbelievable what can fit on a truck
     
  18. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    Could you put 1/2ton load in the truck and haul the other 1/2ton load in a trailer or is it the same difference? I have a 1986 Chevy 4x4, not in the greatest shape, and also need to haul a ton at a time. I am completey ignorant about hauling anything, so please forgive me if this seems like an idiotic question :eek:
     
  19. allen8106

    allen8106 Well-Known Member

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    A 1/2 ton truck can safely haul................. 1/2 ton as the term 1/2 ton truck implies?????????????????????????????
     
  20. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    under all normal conditions the answer is yes, and you will be able to stop ok, you may need to inflate your tires up a little, yes the stopping distance is going to increase, just start to stop before you get to the corner or stop light, if need to drive a little slower,
    The more weight the longer the stopping distance, I don't care if it is motorcycle or a semi truck, drive according.

    My guess is there are SUV's that weigh more than your pickup and the ton of cargo, and there on nearly the same frame.

    don't ride your brakes, (I don't care if you are empty or loaded),

    To my understanding 1/2 ton rating is actually a off road rating, and as far as I can determine it is a military rating for off road use, ever look at 2 1/2 ton military truck the off road rating is for 5000 lb, and road rating is close to 10,000 according to the book,


    http://www.fordvehicles.com/trucks/f150/features/specs/

    acording to ford the current production the pay load rating is from 1800 to 3000 depending on the GVW of the truck,

    and I know from experience the factory ratings are conservative,

    But you Can easily haul a ton of feed, with out worry, in my opinion