How much bread

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by TNHermit, Dec 29, 2006.

  1. TNHermit

    TNHermit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Can you feed a hog a day. i stopped into the local day old bread store for bread and they asked me if I wanted some bread for feed. I said yes, how much? Well at first it was 2.00 for a grocery cart full. then she said for 5.00 i could have a lot more. Well a lot more was about 200 loves of bread. some of it will not go out of date for three days yet. Missed the cupcakes though!

    Mine go nuts over a mix of hog meal,cracked corn and bread mixed up with water. practically rip the bucket out your hand
     
  2. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I feed them as much as they will eat. They do tend to come out on the lardy side.
     

  3. GeorgiaberryM

    GeorgiaberryM Well-Known Member

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    I don't feed mine that any more except as a treat. White bread is empty calories. Bad for you and bad for piggies. I know it seems cheap, especially when you consider the price of corn these days, but there really isn't a lot in the bread; it's actually almost all water.

    If you are giving them a bunch of other stuff then the bread should be fine, just like with us. But you aren't saving very much money.

    Husband o'G
     
  4. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Is this a one off thing? If so, grab it and stuff as much in the freezer as you can and dole the rest out over the next few days. Don't worry too much if it gets a bit mouldy, it doesn't hurt the pigs and they still scoff it down.

    As a stand alone diet, bread isn't much use despite the fact the pigs love it. As Tinknal has said, they come out lardy but added to other food, it helps eke it out and cut down on feed costs a little. I add bread to the cooked food and it absorbs the gravy and thickens it - and don't we all like to mop up the gravy with a slice of bread :)

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  5. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    IMO GB is absolutly wrong. Nutritionally speaking bread is equal to corn. Same protein content, similar energy, etc. As stated, you still need to increase the protein. I use cheese for that (it's free for me). As I said the hogs were lardy, but not with a loss of muscle mass, just extra lard which is no problem for me as I use it all.
     
  6. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Douse some soy meal on the bread and make a wet slop. Give them all they want. If circumstances permit when you get the pigs get all gilts.
     
  7. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I should also add that we pick out whatever bread we want and keep it for the family. This same bread was on store shelves the day before. From every $9. load of bread (which we also feed to our birds) we get well more than $9 worth of bread, doughnuts, bagels, and english muffins for our own use.

    The result is that our feed is esentially free.
     
  8. Rogo

    Rogo Well-Known Member

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    For good condition in your pigs and consequently your meat, why would you feed junk.
     
  9. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Pretty condescending post rogo. Humans worldwide evolved raising a few species almost universally. One of these being the pig. Why? Certainly not because of the smell, not because they are cute, not because they taste good, but because they can live, gain, and provide food from dang near anything that is available to eat. One of these things happens to be bread. You and I share 2 features, one of them being an opinion. Instead of posting snarkisms lets celebrate the incredible adaptability of the swine and revel in it's glory and plentytude.
     
  10. FarmerJeff

    FarmerJeff Well-Known Member

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    We fed quite a bit of bread to our pigs & they turned out just fine. We tried to stick with whole grain breads only, but they did get the occassional hamburger bun. Perhaps the fact that they were on pasture had a lot to do with that.

    agmantoo, any reason why you would want all gilts? We had all gilts, just curious why they would be better?
     
  11. TNHermit

    TNHermit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    i think if you read the post the bread is mixed with Cracked corn and high protein hog chow. And I try and only get the whole wheat LOL
     
  12. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Yes there is a reason for attempting to have gilts. The barrows will put on more fat. With the bread in the diet containing fat/shortning, the barrows will gain more fat than most people desire. Gilts will remain leaner consuming the same feed.
     
  13. stanb999

    stanb999 Well-Known Member

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    So what you are saying is be sure to get barrows because they will gain faster on less feed.

    Store bought bread is not really any different than feeding just grain. You shoud be sure to add protien to the diet. If you fed bread and milk or bread and eggs you would have a balanced mix. Balance is the key. Not where the carbs come from.
     
  14. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Yes Stan, that is what I guess I was saying if you like fat, do not care about your customer or want to establish a rep of producing less desireable pork and are not interested in having lots of repeat customers. Stan, also buy pigs that grade 3 or worse , these types also finish quicker and/or they are cheaper to buy as feeders. A grade 3 pig will be short in length and have no pronounced hams, this will help you identify them. :rolleyes:
     
  15. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    I've raised pigs on everything from pasture and corn to old deep fryer oil and apple peels. Every one was delicious.

    I wouldn't hesitate to feed nothing but bread and my table scraps if they had access to pasture. They might take an extra few weeks to get to size, but what do you care if the food is free. If they have access to pasture, they will burn up the extra calories rooting and playing.

    Pete
     
  16. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yep. Some people spend too much time reading nutrition charts and not enough time feeding hogs. The shining glory of the pig (like the chicken) Is that they can live and thrive on what humans throw away.
     
  17. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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    Bread per say is not junk. Read the nutrition labels. Run the numbers on feed analysis. Bread is a good component of a diet. Yes, there are 'junky' breads but even those contain calories and fast growing pigs need calories. Balance it with dairy or other feeds. Variety is the spice of life.

    Actually, you've got it backwards, both in my experience and based on scientific studies. Gilts (females) grow the slowest and put on the most fat. Barrows (castrated males) grow about 10% faster on average than gilts and have less fat. Boars (intact males) grow the fastest (about 10% faster than barrows), put on the most muscle and have the least fat.
     
  18. luvrulz

    luvrulz Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We feed our oinkers bread in addition to grain and they love it! Our chickens, cows, sheep, ducks, turkeys and guineas all get a serving of bread daily. In addition to their other feed..... They all thrive and look for us when we come out to give them their treats and it's a cheap treat.

    BTW, the oinkers get a five gallon bucket full of whatever we get, whether it's whole wheat, white, english muffins, bagels, etc. per 2 pigs.
     
  19. GeorgiaberryM

    GeorgiaberryM Well-Known Member

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    I should have spoken differently. Bread is almost all air. The second biggest ingredient is water. If you are getting bread from the 2nd hand store then they are not going to give you all wheat. If you consider the level of solids (the nutritional info refers to the solids) in the bread then you may be coming up short for your dime. I know it seems cheap but there really is not very much in it. The pigs do like it. I'd give them some if I had it, but not much. Highlands is right about variety, RedneckPete is right about pasture, Agmantoo is right about his numbers (as usual), and Tinkal is right that they are great at recycling castoffs. But bread is not a good deal, maybe not even if it is free, not even if someone else would make the slop and dump out all of those stupid bags. It really is made out of air and water. Think of how much solids you would get out of the same amount of money and time for feed and hay.

    Sincerely
    Husband o'G
     
  20. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    With all due respect, hogwash. Pound for pound bread is on a par with corn for energy and protien, and is superior in amino acid balance and most vitimins and minerals. The only real health issue is salt, bread being a little high for hogs. It is not so high that it will be a problem as long as there is sufficient fresh water availabls. The fact that bread contains air in it's initial state is inconsequential. Take a bite of bread, chew it a couple times, and spit it out. Any air? Nope.

    I think the thing that absolutly destroys your theory is the fact that I successfully raise hogs on bread. You may raise hogs in theory, I raise them in reality.