How many people have disbudded and horned goats together?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by CarolT, Jan 21, 2011.

  1. CarolT

    CarolT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The baby isn't a polled baby or been disbudded yet. My adult girl, Rosie, has no horns. Is this baby more likely to try to beat Rosie up when she hits adulthood if I leave her "as is"? I don't mind horns but don't want Rosie paying the price. I also would be heartbroken if something went wrong with disbudding with the baby... Experiences?
     
  2. petaddict

    petaddict Well-Known Member

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    I mixed horned and disbudded goats and will never do it again. I got rid of the horned goat because she was really abusing the others, even the ones twice her size. Everyone was afraid of her. Maybe it was just this one goat but I swore I'd never do it again. I've heard other people have had no problems though.
     

  3. Creamers

    Creamers Lucas Farm & WV Raw Milk

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    I do . . .no problems from it in years. . .but I would not buy horned goats. . .I am just keeping my original ones, and they had horns. ..they are Pygmy goats, and the Nigerians and Nubians are all disbudded
     
  4. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    a goat with a bad attitude is a devil weather it has horns or not, i have had big nice calm goats with wicked looking horns that never did anything but look at you, and then i have had goats with NO horns that were holy terrors, it really just depends on the goat,

    one time i had a pregnant LGD in with the herd, the goat with out horns rammed her so bad she lost her pups,

    a mother and daughter pair one with horns one with out would most likely be no problem at all
     
  5. julieq

    julieq Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We disbud all our kids and have the vet take any scurs off under general anesthesia as needed later on. We recently brought a young buck home who had some good sized scurs. He beat up one of our older bucks severely, not letting him have a moment of peace. Had the vet take his scurs off under general also. Much safer for the herd and for us two legged servants to keep them all dehorned in our minds.
     
  6. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    Disbudding looks difficult and is scary the first few times. It rarely "goes wrong."

    Disbud the wee one and have no worries from this point on.:goodjob:
     
  7. nehimama

    nehimama An Ozark Engineer Supporter

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    Had a mini Alpine here, horned. Wonderful gallon-a-day milker; in fact she was the doe out of the whole bunch with the best-tasting milk. HOWEVER, she was wicked with those horns. The day I saw her aim for another doe's udder with those blasted horns (and connect!) I found her a new home. (Yes, I stressed to the new owner that she & her horns were a wicked combination.)

    Horns here? Never again.
     
  8. Cannon_Farms

    Cannon_Farms Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I didnt find it was for me either.
     
  9. thaiblue12

    thaiblue12 Enabler!

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    I have two horned goats in a herd of disbudded. They have never used their horns on anyone. Most of them hit with the top of their heads.
    Sure I have heard they will use theirs to hook a goat or gore them but thankfully I have not had it happen. Mostly mine use them to scratch their backs.
    I would never take them to be dehorned, if for some reason they decide to be brats I would sell them. But they are 3 and 4 years old now so I doubt they are going to change.
    had an evil disbudded goat, she liked to butt me at feeding time, she is no longer here. Maybe she was a jerk because someone else raised her wrong or she was just a jerk. I do not know but she went bye bye for a lower price and a warning about morning feedings. Good producer but what a pest.
     
  10. CarolT

    CarolT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The new baby doesn't belong to Rosie, she's being raised on a bottle after mom rejected her and I got her off Craigslist. When Rosie delivers, I may find out whether she was polled or disbudded (is polled dominate in goats?) as the buck is horned and she's not.
     
  11. CarolT

    CarolT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    And, if I decide to disbud, I'll have to find out if the vets here are used to doing it. Haven't even asked yet...

    Reading somewhere (on here?) about cooking a baby's brain with the iron is what made me start worrying, would have to have someone who knows what they're doing.
     
  12. RedSonja

    RedSonja Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There's also the issue of a horned goat getting hung up in fences or walls to keep in mind. We lost one with horns when she got hung up in the barn and strangled herself. We have one doe with horns now, the rest are disbudded. The horned one is the only bottle baby of the bunch and doesn't try to bully anyone but just having the horns, has bruised me and my kids from normal handling. She also got a horn caught in a barn stall and ripped the end off, it was a nasty bloody mess that we had to hold her down to clean up. All babies born here will be disbudded. (Note to self, order a disbudding iron soon).

    -Sonja
     
  13. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    You'd have to burn the buds waaaaaaaaaaaaay longer to hurt the kid's brain.

    Just follow the instructions, and you (and the kid) will be fine.

    But......... do it NOW! Don't put it off.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2011
  14. motdaugrnds

    motdaugrnds II Corinthians 5:7 Supporter

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    I let only unweaned kids (not disbudded) run with their dams for a period of time. My herd is small; so I can keep an eye on what is going on. I have never seen a kid attempt to use its little horns to hurt a grown goat. When the kids are weaned, they go into a separate pen. In that pen I have seen one goat harmed by being horned by another only once; and the cut healed in a matter of days without infection.

    This being said, I still believe disbudding kids (before they are weaned) is the best way to go. We have a disbudding "box" to use which makes it much easier; and once you've done it a few times, you realize it isn't that difficult.
     
  15. chicamarun

    chicamarun Well-Known Member

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    I have mixed without any issues - but I think it depends on the goats. I have 1 with horns who is just a bully - but she's a bully with anyone. I have a wether in with the dairy goats - he has horns (he was MEANT for the freezer but my daughter cried at the 4-H auction so we got her back) and he gets his butt kicked all the time by my Nubians ;)
     
  16. Backfourty,MI.

    Backfourty,MI. Katie Supporter

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    I have some with horns & some that are disbudded, 1 that is naturally polled. Mine all get along fine here & have never had a problem with the goats that have horns.
     
  17. stgagnon

    stgagnon Well-Known Member

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    We have both and there has never been a horn-related problem. The 'queen' is a big 5 yo saanen and the next in line is a boer doe of the same age and somewhat bigger/heavier. The queen has no horns and her rival has big horns. They butt heads occassionally.. no harm done. Being queen is a state of mind. :)
     
  18. Willowynd

    Willowynd Well-Known Member

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    I have both and have not had an issue to date. The boer doe and wether have their horns, the nubian does don't.
     
  19. copperpennykids

    copperpennykids Well-Known Member Supporter

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    All of our dairy goats are disbudded. Would never have a dairy goat with horns.

    Most of our Boers have horns. We run disbudded with horned goats all of the time. No issues. The Boers aren't aggressive with their horns. There are herd queens - but they rule both the horned and the disbudded goats. And many of the disbudded goats are higher in the pecking order than some of the horned goats.

    If you can disbud, you probably should... Especially if these are dairy goats.
     
  20. mpete

    mpete Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have noticed that in my herd that horned 'dairy' breeds (usually alpinish) will be aggressive, but the boers usually do not get aggressive. I agree I think it is a state of mind. If it works in your herd, great! just be aware that horns do have an advantage if the goat decides to use it... that is what I am going through right now.