How many could I raise?

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by famer_manda, Jun 19, 2006.

  1. famer_manda

    famer_manda I Love CHICKENS!

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    I made a pen today that is about 70 feet by 20 feet (rectangle) I would like to get some pigs. I think I would like to raise them for future breeding so that I could replenish my pigs without having to wait and wait for feeder pigs to be in the paper for sale. Is this too much room for pigs? do they do better in a small area? I could section off parts of it and use 3/4 of the size for .. lets say my ducks or something.

    I have a lot to learn about pigs yet and I hope to learn here at this board. I just need to get some pigs and get started :p I didn't know anything about ducks or chickens until I got them and I believe I have mastered those now. I believe I have relatively mastered goats and I hate male goats now LOL. Now i would like to try out pigs! I can smell the future ones sizzling on the grill already!
     
  2. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    How much manure do you want to deal with? The volume of waste will be significant if you were to use the space to maximum.
     

  3. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    For what you have described, I would get 2 to 4 female feeder pigs and raise them to 220 to 250 lb. size. Then I would pick the best 1 or 2 for breeding stock and keep them. Put the others in your freezer. Then find a boar for your gilts and breed them timed so they farrow when weather is pleasant .
    If you advance to that stage, you will want to have a separate pen & shelter for each sow to farrow in and raise her piglets. You will also need a separate area for Boar at that time.
     
  4. famer_manda

    famer_manda I Love CHICKENS!

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    sounds great!

    Well Yes I want the manure too btw.. We could use the "fertilizer" .. We mostly live in sand so I am hoping to get some real grass growing on some areas and the Pigs could "help" :p
     
  5. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    OMG I can't believe I am going to contradict Up North :eek: BUT... Check out Highlands' website http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/2006/01/more-piglets.html and other pages of his blog to see how he raises them in VT. I have two of his pigs born communally in a cave in January, and they are healthy and wonderful. No matter what your setup you are gonna love pigs, they are the greatest animals! The only bad thing is the trip to the butcher. :Bawling:

    When I moved them to a new spot, I threw a handful of corn over the manure. In 24 hours it was worked into the soil by the chickens, completely gone and no odor.
     
  6. BD

    BD Active Member

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    hi, depending where you are located you might be better off getting a breed gilt for your feeder pigs and maybe trading some for a boar ???? or selling them and then buying a boar. i found its best for male and female to be pretty close in size.
     
  7. beeman97

    beeman97 Well-Known Member

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    Manda,
    I would advise that you only get 2 pigs to start. An area that is 70x20 is not large at all when it comes to pigs & they will lay waste to it in a hurry. Pigs are not like any other animal you will ever raise & the learning curve can be quite steep at the beginning. The more room a pig has the happy it is, & crowding them only creates trouble. They require a totally different kind of fence set up then your used to im sure. & penning to move or load is another whole adventure in itself.
    getting 2 guilts & keeping the best one for breeding would be a good way to start & then either have her AI'd or rent a boar to get the job done. from that litter you will get plenty to raise & save for the freezer or sell to help off set costs. & it will give you time to get used to having hogs around & what they require to stay happy & healthy.
    Good Luck & keep us posted on how things are going.
    Rick
     
  8. famer_manda

    famer_manda I Love CHICKENS!

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    My fencing is chain link buried about 4 inches. My husband said he would add an electric line along the bottom and maybe along the top too (for other animals trying to get in) Does that sound pig efficent?
     
  9. VApigLover

    VApigLover Well-Known Member

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    Farmer Manda, We use chain link also, brought in a 400# Sow, who also liked to climb this fence. I used electric wire along the bottom and one along the top. Needless to say the climbing days are over and only accasionally does she push a stick or somthing into the bottom wire. I would say you should be good to go with that.
     
  10. famer_manda

    famer_manda I Love CHICKENS!

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    Did you bury the fencing at all? I am moving the fence today because hubby doesn't want it in the area I put it so now I can chose a good depth for it. I was thinking about 4 inches. Is that enough or should i make it deeper? it will be sandy area. I really want the manure and stuff so I can finally grow grass over there. Plus it will be partially under an apple tree so they can get treats from above :p
     
  11. beeman97

    beeman97 Well-Known Member

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    Chain link will work fine as long as you add the electric to it.
    & as long as your doing that , there is really no need to burey it at all. 1 wire at 6 or 8 inches off the ground will do the trick nicely another one at about 18 to 24 inches will keep them off it totally.
    You will need to keep check on the wires, the pigs will root everything up to it & cover it up with dirt or in your case sand.
     
  12. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    Do you think they do that on purpose to kill the elecricity? Or is it just that they keep rooting and when they get to the edge they are blocked so it mounds up? They're so smart I can't hlep wondering. I find that with the bottom wire at 8" they can't mound it high enough to interfere. But Manda with little ones you need it at 4 or 5" to start. You won't ned the chain link if you use wire, and you can use tape or rope instead of wire if you wnat to move them around. Super simple. Tape is easiest, cut with scissors and tie in knots.
     
  13. famer_manda

    famer_manda I Love CHICKENS!

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    That is interesting.. Maybe I will use my chain link area for the pygmy goats then and get the line for pigs
     
  14. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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  15. famer_manda

    famer_manda I Love CHICKENS!

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