How long down is too much?

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by dcs13, Mar 12, 2005.

  1. dcs13

    dcs13 Member

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    Reference my other thread about using "Bute" for the chronic founder condition:
    This heifer never should have made it this far. She's 2 now. She was a difficult birth and I think she was oxygen deprived and was a "dumb calf". We had to feed her as she failed to nurse in the first 24 hours. Well, we finally taught her to nurse and she's made it this far.
    We decided to withdraw the "bute" as it was not improving her condition. She has a lot of joint pain in the front due to the founder. We noticed yesterday her grazing, but today she is just laying around. She got up to feed this morning , but was in obvious pain.
    My question is this: If she continues to eat and get up occaisionally, how long should I let this ride ? While laying down, she doesn't show any pain. At what point do you say, thats enough and put her down ?
    I was hoping to keep her until April 8th and take her to the packer then, but I want to do the right thing.
     
  2. DaleK

    DaleK Well-Known Member

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    If an animal is in pain and not improving, you put it down as soon as you determine that it isn't improving, or that there isn't much likelihood of improvement.
     

  3. dcs13

    dcs13 Member

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    Thats my issue. Since this is a "chronic" condition its not gonna get better, and I realize I will have to put her down. I was just hoping to make the 30 days so I could pack her.
    She wasn't too bad yesterday and grazed around fairly well. I guess the joints swelled from yesterday and today was the worst I have seen her, she barley got up all day..If she stays off her feet she feels ok.
    If she's as bad tommorow as she was today, I will take her monday and put her down (that stinks because she's really been my wifes "pasture princess"...THe wife really babied her and she's so tame)
    Thanks for your input.
     
  4. evermoor

    evermoor Well-Known Member

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    I've mentioned this before but I saved a similiar cdalf that was almost frozen to death. This calf had many many problems but she made it till darn near three before we butchereed her. She basically manuevered on her front knees in a kneeling position. If she stood it looked like those bad ricket cases. The hooves were like a foundered and twisted, requireing constant trimming to alleviate pressure. Maybe a hooftrimming can get her till her due date. BY the way it was lousy meat really tuff and gristly.
     
  5. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    "BY the way it was lousy meat really tuff and gristly."


    Probably due to the stress
     
  6. dcs13

    dcs13 Member

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    We have been trimming her hooves over her lifetime. The farrier was here about 4 weeks ago and she had a trim then. The vet says the joints are her pain points because of the condition.
    When she walks she looks un-coordinated with her fronts, almost putting them one in front of the other.(like being knock-kneed)
    Shes standing this morning. I'll see what's going on today when I feed in a few hours.