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OK, I have 7 hummingbird feeders that I am keeping full of sugar water. The hummingbirds started migrating through my area about a month ago.

From first daylight to pitch black dark, it sounds like a motorcycle (a Honda, not a Harley) running out there. I see about 15 to 25 hummingbirds feeding constantly all day long every day. And I love it.

My question is whether the hummingbirds that I see one day are the same ones that I saw the day before and the day before that . . . or are they new birds that are migrating through every day?

Google does not know. I am NOT talking about how long migrating hummingbirds in general feed in an area. Or how long I should keep feeders out.

I am talking about individual hummingbirds, and how long they hang around a house before moving on.

Anybody know?
Hummingbirds are beautiful...Ever watch that tv channel that shows all kinds of "fails"....its on my air channel 24.1.

People send in vids of all kinds of fails...and there is an animal fail..one has a hummingbird sitting on this

guys hand and drinking out of a saucer...Never seen one doing that except in flight mode...extraordinary... (y)
 

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This summer, I had brought the hummingbird feeder into the house to clean it and refill. Went out the back door, across the porch, and had started down the steps. On the first step, a hummingbird flew up and started feeding from the feeder. I froze and he fed for about a minute, off and on, like they do. It was pretty neat watching him that close.
 

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Thank you for posting the link, Kstar, the article was very informative! I had the exact same question of when to take down my feeders. According to the chart, I should be leaving them up until mid-December (I’m in North Central Ohio). I know we have migrators from the North in addition to the seasonal regulars, but it’s really difficult to guess when to take down the feeders - what if there are late stragglers? I hadn’t seen any actual hummers at the feeders for a few weeks but the volume of the sugar water was visibly decreasing from day to day. There are quite a few flowers around, too, so food is still readily available, but that will change with the first hard frost. So I guess I’ll just follow the recommendation of mid-December and monitor the volume of the sugar water in the feeder. :)
You're welcome :)

Yeah, it seems that sometimes there are a few out there when there "shouldn't be." I suppose it doesn't hurt to leave them up all year, either. A lot of factors to consider!

Sometimes bees and wasps will drink out of the hummingbird feeders when their food is becoming scarce, too (start of the colder weather when flowers are dying and when they come out in the spring from feeding on honey all winter and they need something right away). It can be a little hummingbird passing through. I think some here are on their migration out. I saw 3 hummingbirds hanging around one evening and the next day, I didn't see them at all.
 

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In the western United States, the hummingbird stays in much of its range year around. But most hummingbirds do go south for the winter. You might as well enjoy their visits on their way. I always keep my feeders up for a few weeks after I stop seeing hummingbirds in the fall.
 
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