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Don't let "good enough" be the enemy of perfect.
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OK, I have 7 hummingbird feeders that I am keeping full of sugar water. The hummingbirds started migrating through my area about a month ago.

From first daylight to pitch black dark, it sounds like a motorcycle (a Honda, not a Harley) running out there. I see about 15 to 25 hummingbirds feeding constantly all day long every day. And I love it.

My question is whether the hummingbirds that I see one day are the same ones that I saw the day before and the day before that . . . or are they new birds that are migrating through every day?

Google does not know. I am NOT talking about how long migrating hummingbirds in general feed in an area. Or how long I should keep feeders out.

I am talking about individual hummingbirds, and how long they hang around a house before moving on.

Anybody know?
 

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Thanks to my wife's green thumb and unwilliness to limit the sizes of her flower gardens, they swarm here.
But, now that you posted, I don't think I have seen any this week and the temps have dropped into the 70s and then 50s at night.
I'll make a note and pay attention today.
 

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I just saw something a couple of weeks ago. They do a stopover normally just a fill up and then go on their way again by the next day.
 

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Hummingbirds are territorial.

 

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Don't let "good enough" be the enemy of perfect.
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Hummingbirds are territorial.

Yeah, for sure a few try to control access to a feeders.

But when you have 7 feeders and 20+ hummingbirds in a small area, the bullies are overwhelmed and cannot control it.
 

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We see the same 4 birds at our feeders from ~ May 1 to the present.
If you're seeing increased activity at your feeders, it's probably migrants passing thru in addition to your regulars.
.
 

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Depends on weather and how far they have already migrated. The weather (mostly wind direction) has to be conducive to flying long distance. They’ll hunker down and eat until they have favorable flight conditions and have gained more weight back.
 

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Good question. No definate answer but, here in southern Minnesota, we're seeing much less activity. My wifelady makes her own necter and was refilling the empty feeders every other day. Now, she has to empty them every 3 days. We've been down to near 40° several times, though. Our oriole feeders were hardly even used this year. Still have lots of goldfinches.
 
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They will stay as long as you keep the feeders out. Sometimes they will stay so late in the fall that they freeze to death.
 

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It could possibly be the same group of hummingbirds if they have made their homes nearby. If it's the middle of migration, it could be different ones. Have you noticed the hummingbirds flying to nearby trees to hang out or do they all seem to leave?

I suppose it depends on your area, too. Around here it seems like a lot of hummingbirds leave our area around October-February. I don't see a whole lot of them in the winter here. I suppose it's possible we have a few that are sticking behind.

Some hummingbirds may stay year round if you live in an area that's warm enough. If you don't want them there, just remove the feeders.

Check this out for when to put your feeders out, it may help give a general idea. Just scroll down for the state chart.

 

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They will stay as long as you keep the feeders out. Sometimes they will stay so late in the fall that they freeze to death.
I imagine there is some truth to this as the flowers that hummingbirds feast on here have gone past and now they have left as well.

Hummingbirds don't eat white sugar in nature and when humans eat white sugar, it causes health problems.

Plant some native plants and let the hummingbirds have real food instead of mcdonald's, please.
 

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West of the Mississippi there are several species of hummingbirds. But east of the river we have Ruby-throated Hummingbirds and a few misguided migrants. The Ruby-throats move south when it gets chilly. It doesn't matter if the flowers are blooming and feeders are out. They move on when nature tells them.

The jewelweed is in full bloom here. It's one of their favorites in this area. But I haven't seen any hummers for a few days. I don't have very many around so I may not be looking at the right time. One buzzed my daughter's friend last week.
 

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OK, I have 7 hummingbird feeders that I am keeping full of sugar water. The hummingbirds started migrating through my area about a month ago.

From first daylight to pitch black dark, it sounds like a motorcycle (a Honda, not a Harley) running out there. I see about 15 to 25 hummingbirds feeding constantly all day long every day. And I love it.

My question is whether the hummingbirds that I see one day are the same ones that I saw the day before and the day before that . . . or are they new birds that are migrating through every day?

Google does not know. I am NOT talking about how long migrating hummingbirds in general feed in an area. Or how long I should keep feeders out.

I am talking about individual hummingbirds, and how long they hang around a house before moving on.

Anybody know?
Until it becomes a bat.
 

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The southern migration started here about 3 weeks ago. At the height of it , the 2 fillings a week of the feeders I maintained for the seasons resident birds increased to three to four fills a week as the early migrators came through before the resident birds migrated. For the past week, one feeder fill has sufficed for the late migrators and I plan to bring it in for the winter in the next week or so for storage until Spring as I am only seeing a passing migrator once a day or so now.

Many of the hummers migrate all the way to Costa Rica however many winter in SW Texas and Mexico also.
 

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Don't let "good enough" be the enemy of perfect.
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Thanks. Yep. Our number has dropped to only 4 or 5 humming birds at the feeders most of the day.

I can't imagine those little birds flying that far.

Something that I have not seen mentioned is whether they fly in flocks or just fly as solitary birds during migration.
 

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It could possibly be the same group of hummingbirds if they have made their homes nearby. If it's the middle of migration, it could be different ones. Have you noticed the hummingbirds flying to nearby trees to hang out or do they all seem to leave?

I suppose it depends on your area, too. Around here it seems like a lot of hummingbirds leave our area around October-February. I don't see a whole lot of them in the winter here. I suppose it's possible we have a few that are sticking behind.

Some hummingbirds may stay year round if you live in an area that's warm enough. If you don't want them there, just remove the feeders.

Check this out for when to put your feeders out, it may help give a general idea. Just scroll down for the state chart.

Thank you for posting the link, Kstar, the article was very informative! I had the exact same question of when to take down my feeders. According to the chart, I should be leaving them up until mid-December (I’m in North Central Ohio). I know we have migrators from the North in addition to the seasonal regulars, but it’s really difficult to guess when to take down the feeders - what if there are late stragglers? I hadn’t seen any actual hummers at the feeders for a few weeks but the volume of the sugar water was visibly decreasing from day to day. There are quite a few flowers around, too, so food is still readily available, but that will change with the first hard frost. So I guess I’ll just follow the recommendation of mid-December and monitor the volume of the sugar water in the feeder. :)
 

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The liquid volume of feeders often react like a thermometer resulting in the feeder mix dripping out.
 

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I thought the barometric pressure caused the sugar water level to drop. But that wouldn't affect the levels of those tray feeders.

I am switching to tray feeders. They are easier to clean and don't drip when the barometer drops.
 
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