How hot is too hot?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by rocket, Jun 22, 2006.

  1. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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    It's been over 100 degrees here for a while now. Today is supposed to hit 110. I just saw the forecast and Saturday is supposed to hit 116 !!! Yuck! Does anyone know if there are temperature limits beyond which different garden veggies can't survive? Or maybe the extra heat will just ripen my tomatoes faster? *crosses fingers*
     
  2. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

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    Tomatoes, peppers, melons, squash, beans, corn all like the heat. Lettuce will bolt. Peas and cole crops don't like the heat.
     

  3. mama2littleman

    mama2littleman El Paso

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    The tomatoes will stop setting fruit. Temps that are too high will damage the pollen. Peppers will probably be fine, same with the melons. Forget about lettuce, peas, or any othe cole crop.

    Keep everything watered, and pray for a cold front. Treat the heat of summer like northerners would treat winter, except there is more you can do to buffer the effects. I.e. shade cloth, watching the moisture level, and if plants are in containers move them to shadier areas.

    Nikki
     
  4. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    On the upside, you can always fry eggs on your car. Okra likes it hot. Peppers like heat. As for me I'll take four seasons.
     
  5. BeckyW

    BeckyW Well-Known Member

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    Some varieties of plants will stop setting new fruit especially above 110 however as long as you keep everything watered, they come through. True lettuce and spinach are done for.

    Shade cloth is an excellent suggestion if you didn't plant varieties that are especially heat and drought tolerant. Depending on the varieties you planted, 105 is nothing to worry about. The San Joaquin valley grows much of the produce for this nation and an average summer day is over 100!

    Couple of pointers from one who has lived in the desert:
    1. Water VERY early in the morning, preferable just before/after dawn.
    2. Refrain from any watering during the day - you'll actually do the plant more harm than good!
    3. Water again at sunset.
    4. Mulch can be helpful to keep the soil shaded and moist if you haven't planted close enough that the leaf canopy covers the soil.
    5. Another option if you don't want to invest in shade cloth is go get poles and make a "wall" out of a blanket (secure all 4 corners) on the southwest end of the garden. You'll have direct sun until noon or so however afternoon shade in the shadow of the wall. Place your "blanket wall" so that it shades the most fragile of your plants.

    BW
     
  6. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, everybody. I only have warm-season crops now. Lettuce and peas are strictly for the winter garden around here. As for your pointers, I use drip irrigation run automatically in the evening and everything is well mulched with grass-clippings. I had been reading some info on plant heat stress that seemed to indicate that lots of plants would begin to die at temps over 115. But I'm only getting one day at that level, so I'm sure the garden will come through just fine. I do, however, worry that I will end up wilting!

    And I think I'll spare my car's paint job and try frying the eggs on the sidewalk! :)
     
  7. ScorpionFlower

    ScorpionFlower Insanity prevails

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    I was worrying about the same thing. Although your temps are going to be higher than mine. We'll be at 105 on Sunday, so the forcast says. I got a late start on my garden, and it's my first time gardening at this property. Nothing is producing as yet. My grape tomatoe plant has started showing flowers though. Not sure if anything's going to happen more with it, or the 6 large tomatoe plants. They haven't flowered or anything. I water 2 times a day. In the morning after I milk the goat and in the evening just before sundown. I have most of my plants in rows that I dug trenches to plant them in to keep the water going to the plant and not the dirt. My tomatoes, watermelons and cantalope are in volcanoes (lacking for a better term LOL). And here I was worried I may be over watering them. At least they're green! LOL

    I was outside cleaning the pool and I feel like I can fry an egg on my back!!!! Owweeee. And I used lotion!!! It's just hotter then heck!!!
     
  8. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'd like to add sweet potatoes LOVE The heat. I'll be planting my slips this week in the steaming south!!!
     
  9. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Tomatoes will not set fruit when it is that hot. If they already have fruit, you have hopes for those.
    mary
     
  10. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Most peppers (maybe all) won't set fruit when it is over 90 degrees (and temps under 50 degrees seem to set them back too.)
     
  11. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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    Well, lucky for me the 116 temps never quite materialized. But we had 3 or 4 days at about 108 and the heat wave isn't over yet. Most everything in the garden did fine. The only problem I had was that my hill of Lakota squash had really severe wilting every day. I even pulled one of the plants out, hoping to reduce the water demand on the hill.