How Hot is Rabbit Manure & can you plant directly into it?

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by anniew, Feb 22, 2017.

  1. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

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    I have been dumping my rabbit trays that contain both the solid part and urine onto my garden area. If I do not till the garden before planting, will the manure kill the plants and/or seeds? Since there is still time before planting time for the rains to move the liquid part, especially, into the soil, I am wondering if my lazy idea will work.
    Does anyone have experience planting directly into the manure? Did it work or not?
    TIA
     
  2. jwal10

    jwal10 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would spread it out over the entire garden when putting it out. You can plant into the manure but the urine can be heavy with salts. I would work it into the soil to improve the tilth of the soil and capture more nutrients before planting. My Son had a 8'x12' double row, covered hutch in one spot for 2 years, moved it, dug the manure into the soil and planted garden there, had a great garden. He kept the manure cleaned out but all the urine soaked into the soil under the cages and there was 6" of manure when he dug it in....James
     

  3. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Rabbit manure is hot. I can't tell if you are dumping 10 pounds on a 50 by 50 garden or 100 pounds on a 10 by 10 spot. A bag of barn lime will drive a lot of the ammonia out, helping to prevent burning the plants.

    If avoiding the labor of working up the soil worked, why would anyone do it?
     
  4. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

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    haypoint, I am dumping 5 gallon buckets of the tray stuff in a 50 foot row. I don't know how many buckets, but I'd say 20 -25...and just leaving them spread out only along the row. This is really overtop of a grass area that I want to make into additional gardening space. I can spread it a little more to cover a bit of wider area to make a raised bed. If I add some Pro-Mix at planting time, I am hoping I can plant directly into that mixture come May since I think the rain will dilute and/or make the urine part seep down into the soil and the ammonia will somewhat vaporize.

    Do you think it might work?
     
  5. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Have you gardened before? 25 buckets in 50 foot row is close to a continuous pile. A pile of manure on top of sod, does not equal garden to me. How will you control the grass? Are you thinking not even rototilling the garden?
    Rabbit manure is a valuable product. Hoping to lose fertilizer isn't wise. A non-soil potting mix mixed with un-composted rabbit manure, over a mat of grass equates uncontrolled grass in the garden.

    Next Fall, collect as much old moldy straw, tree leaves and grass clippings as you can locate. Make a circle out of old fencing, concrete mesh, snow fence, 8 feet across. Line it with straw. Cover with a tarp. As winter goes on, put all your rabbit manure into it, add leaves and whatever you collected. Keep it covered, trying to limit rain from eroding it.

    Kill the grass by covering with a sheet of black plastic or five layers of cardboard.



    Then when spring comes, you can pull off the ground cover, spread your compost and work it in to the soil.
     
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  6. Belfrybat

    Belfrybat Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Rabbit manure is a "cool" manure and it can be spread on a garden without composting. But if you are talking about several inches, or even a foot of pure manure, the urine salts might cause you problems. To be on the safe side, if I were you, I'd till the manure into the garden to mix it with the soil.
    Of course, as others have mentioned you could also compost it along with lots of grass, leaves, straw, etc.

    Here's a good link on bunny poo: http://www.crossroadsrabbitry.com/rabbit-manure-info/
     
  7. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I put all the rabbit manure I want/need under the plants in the garden and even around the plants, BUT I only use the poop, with no urine in it.