How far would you move to homestead?

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by mndreamer, Nov 9, 2006.

  1. mndreamer

    mndreamer Member

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    Hi, I'm new here. I have been reading posts here for a few months. My question is... How far would you move to homestead? I live in a suburb of Minneapolis right now(in town). And there is a possiblity of my husband's job moving us to north of Dallas. We have looked at some farm properties online and they seem to be more affordable then what is available in this area. The 1000 mile move scares me. New climate, new lifestyle, lack of family & friends in the area.
    It has always been my dream to be on a farm of some type. And I want my children (ages 2,4,5) to know what real living is all about. But I wonder if this would just be too much change, too fast.
    Any thoughts?
     
  2. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Start with chickens.....(You already have your hands full w/ kiddos that young.) And a garden. Let the kids plant their own small garden (we did corn the first time w/ kids)

    A milk goat or two if hubby is avail to milk and/or watch children so milking can be done by you but learn from someone experienced before hand.

    Read some books on homesteading, gardening, farming etc.....and just do it....I think "moms" are very in tune to livestock typically because we learn how to read our childrens body language....

    Oh! And ask any question you have right HERE on this forum! :)
     

  3. farmergirl

    farmergirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We moved 1600 miles 3 years ago and are loving our farm. It's like we were meant to live where we live.
     
  4. hillsidedigger

    hillsidedigger Well-Known Member

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    Relieved of obligations here

    I would be gone within 6 months (dependent upon season)

    the 4,000 (it is 4,000 isn't it) miles

    to Alaska.
     
  5. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    LOL I moved from Alaska to here to farm 4000.2 miles door to door!
     
  6. mndreamer

    mndreamer Member

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    We are actually going down to Texas next Friday to visit DH grandparents. But they are another 500 miles south of Dallas. So that won't be much help. But at least we can get a feel of the state.
    Is the Texas heat hard on animals? Is it hard to keep them comfortable? We are considering eventually getting chickens, dairy goats & maybe horses.
    What are some things to look for or avoid in a Texas homestead, or any homestead for that matter?
     
  7. NickieL

    NickieL Accidental Farmer

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    Im torn......I think I would love living somewhere up in Michigan, I love it in the summer a lot, or Wisconsin maybe, but then there is the whole winter thing which I'm not as fond of...
     
  8. NikkiL

    NikkiL Well-Known Member

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    We luckily live only an hour from our homestead. But luckily it's in Mississippi, lower tax state especially for retirees. That and I absolutely love that part of Mississippi. Rolling hills, piney woods,a gorgeous river for tubing and boating, hunting, fishing, and the nicest most polite people. I'm in heaven.
     
  9. gibbsgirl

    gibbsgirl Well-Known Member

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    We moved over 2000 miles.
     
  10. thestartupman

    thestartupman Well-Known Member

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    We moved about 2000 miles from WA, to MO. I have to say that the best suggestion I can recommend is getting to know your neighbors, without being a nosy neighbor. Having friends in your new area is the best thing to get comfortable to your new home.
     
  11. Yvonne's hubby

    Yvonne's hubby Murphy was an optimist ;) Staff Member

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    I would avoid any homestead in Texas.... But that's just me, I don't like the humididity in east Texas nor the dry dry dry in west Texas.
     
  12. cfuhrer

    cfuhrer Wood Nymph / Toxophilite

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    How far would I move?
    To the end of the earth if the opportunity came up.
     
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  13. Mish

    Mish Well-Known Member

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    We've spent our adult lives moving around the country with the military, so we're not used to being near family and old friends as it is. Now that he's retired, we can really move anywhere we want to start our homestead (once we work a few more years and save a little more money)...which is a blessing and a curse.

    Having every option in the world open to you is a little overwhelming when trying to make a permanent decision. But, any direction we go, we are definitely moving at a minimum of 20 hours from where we now live. So, yeah, I'd move pretty far ;)

    If I still had little kids like you do, I personally would have wanted them to be closer to extended family. That's one thing I really hated about the military moves, kids couldn't just pop over to see grandma, aunts, uncles, or the cousins, and now they're not close at all (emotionally) to anyone outside of our nuclear family. That being said, little kids adapt quickly to change as long as you, as the parents, put a positive spin on it as much as possible. Definitely easier convincing under-10 year olds to live out in the boonies than it is when they are teenagers...
     
  14. andrew3d

    andrew3d Well-Known Member

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    Texas is hot in the summers.
    Having enough water can be a problem in quite a few areas.
    Animals need shelter from the heat, either a built shelter or trees.
    Winters are mild, but there are occasional hard freezes which requires some care for your animals.
    Property taxes are on the high side. But Texas does offer an agricultural exemption on land if you are farming or ranching.
    Homestead exemption on your residence, but does not help much.
    No income tax in Texas.
    Look for good soil to start with, some places are rocky, and/or have poor soils.
    My wife moved from New Jersey, about 2000 miles I think, and she loves Texas, but still does not like the humidity and hot summers.
    I think rural land in Texas is generally higher than rural lands in Minnesota and Michigan. Compare on landsoftexas.com and landsofminnesota.com.

    Texans are friendly people so you won't have any trouble at all making friends. Be friendly and Texans will be friendly right back.

    Good luck.
    .
     
  15. Harry Chickpea

    Harry Chickpea Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've moved a number of times. Each move has been an adventure. If it doesn't fit, you move again. If you get bored, you move again. There is plenty of time to rest in a box.
     
  16. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    What we did, was to start at my husbands place of work and take the highway out of town. When we had traveled what DH thought was a reasonable commute then we started looking for a place that far out.
     
  17. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I once went to Ontario.
     
  18. Bellyman

    Bellyman Well-Known Member

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    Go for it! If the job moves, find a place there you think you'd like that's more inline with your 'homestead' mindset.

    Life can change over time. Your ideas of 'ideal' can change over time. A wonderful situation right now might not be quite right for you 50 years from now, and that's ok.

    I grew up in the house my parents still live in. They built it in the 1950s. They can't imagine living anywhere else. But I, on the other hand, have lived (in some cases quite briefly) in PA, LA, FL, MS, KY, AZ and now have my eye set on TN.

    There is no reason to think that if you move to TX that you can't move again if you decide it's not the place for you. Where ever you go, you can continue to learn more skills and accumulate the kinds of things that would be the tools for your homestead.

    Or... if you find out that where you move to in TX is THE place you've always dreamed it could be and decide to stay forever, great! Never know, if it's that good, other family members could decide it's a good place to call home, too. :)
     
  19. FLAndy

    FLAndy Well-Known Member

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    I started in Indiana and developed a true love for agriculture. Then I moved to Florida where I was introduced to an unlimited growing season and a plethora pf exotics. I lived in western North Carolina for a couple of years and discovered thats the area for me. My family has a cabin on the other side of the mountains in Tennessee and the taxes are far more favorable. Tennessee is where I will build a second home and do the snowbird thing in my later years.
     
  20. Jokarva

    Jokarva Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Is the move a done deal?

    If so you can always buy a property that would be homesteading friendly, then take your time getting set up. Nothing says you have to have critters and a big garden immediately, jumping in and making huge changes all at once is too overwhelming IMHO, but then I hate change.