How does that many lady bugs get inside a house?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by primroselane, Jan 15, 2005.

  1. primroselane

    primroselane Well-Known Member

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  2. Rita

    Rita Well-Known Member Supporter

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    He says they don't bite? Makes you wonder how much contact he has had with the nasty things. They seemed messier this year than ever. We have had to wash our covered porch area three times and it needs it again! Rita
     

  3. OD

    OD Well-Known Member

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    They are REALLY bad when you get one in your tea & crunch it. The taste is indescribable!!!! They are like a plague of locusts, but not quite as bad as fire ants.
     
  4. apirlawz

    apirlawz playing in the dirt

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    We were absoultely plagued by them last year, I was vacuuming them up left and right. Last fall, the chickens spend a lot of time ranging around the house, and now, I could count on one hand the number I've seen inside this winter! :D

    I don't know exactly what they do, but they do give you something similar to a gnat bite, although I've never seen a welt, reddness or any swelling associated with it.

    Here in SD, they say that they were imported to control aphids in either corn or soybeans, I forget which one.

    April
     
  5. Gayle in KY

    Gayle in KY Gadabout

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    Hey, April, don't get too excited about not seeing many this year. They seem to run in cycles- about every 3 years we get a lot of them. When they get really bad, chickens will not help. I don't know if they are overwhelming to them or what.
     
  6. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    These things are _not_ the everyday 'lady bugs' we used to have. They are Asian Beetles, and look much like Lady Bugs - but typcally a redder color.

    They were imported into the southern USA to control some aphids. With no natural problems, they really, really took off in this country.

    They are so dumb they 'taste' you to see if you are good food or not. This bite does sting, but that are not trying to do anything to you - just curiousity on their part.

    Here in the northern climates they do eat the soybean aphids which were a terrible problem (also imported) a couple years ago. I fear we will have those aphids every few years, depending on southern warm winds. I don't know if they also eat alfalfa beetles, might be what they were brought in for????

    They naturally hibernate in cliffs, and basically use our buildings for these 'cliffs'. So tons & tons of them crawl into the cracks & crevices of your house.

    They are just aweful, coating the south of the house on warm fall days, and every time it warms up a bit we get a bunch in the house. When it is 10 degrees or less they pretty much are tucked away, out of sight. In summer they are out in the fields, looking for food, and not around the house.

    I'll bet you have more if you are out in the rural where there is a source of aphids.

    --->Paul
     
  7. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    The last two years have seen proliferation of lady bugs unlike I've ever seen before here. They seek cracks in the walls and come out on warm days since our frosty winter keeps them hibernating from fall to spring. I love seeing them and they are beneficial in eating aphids. The odd one drops into the coffee or something (extra protein. :haha: ). Other than that, I've had no particular harm come from them. I only wish we had more dragonflies to eat mosquitoes.
     
  8. Gayle in KY

    Gayle in KY Gadabout

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    moonwolf- be careful what you wish for...I used to wish for more ladybugs! :D
     
  9. Corky

    Corky Well-Known Member

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    I was told this house is built very tight. I have been up in the attic and believe me we have plenty of insulation. Our walls are stone. Our windows are double glass and have tight seals. Then...... how come I have a kazillion japanize lady bugs in my house?? :eek: I am thankful that most of them are sleeping somewhere right now. In the fall they were crawling all over my ceilings. Now I see a few crawling on the windows or a table each day but not a lot.
    The thing is, I know the others are still in here somewhere. :eek: :eek:
     
  10. apirlawz

    apirlawz playing in the dirt

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    Actually, folks are complaining more this year than last...they made the news quite a bit this fall... :eek: It was weird going outside on Indian summer-type days last fall...they buzzed all over the place, you could not walk outside without having them crawling all over you! But, it sure did make for good entertainment watching the chickens going after them! :haha: :haha:

    There were definitely more this past fall then the year prior, when we had the problems in the house. I just hope the peak of the cycle is not still coming! :eek:

    April
     
  11. Gayle in KY

    Gayle in KY Gadabout

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    April, I'm wondering if the cycles are the same, from one area to the next. We only had a few this year. The influx part of the cycle might depend on when they first appeared in an area. (I don't really know- it's just a guess)
     
  12. apirlawz

    apirlawz playing in the dirt

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    That's a good point. I'm not sure when they were introduced into this area. On the news this past fall, they would explain that they were imported to control aphids, but I never quite caught when they came.

    I also wonder if our colder climate helps keep the numbers in check. In other words, our peak in the cycle here in South Dakota might be considerably less than yours in Kentucky, with that tropical climate you have down there... :D (keep in mind, it's -4 right now!! Anything above zero is tropical in my book!! :cool: )

    And on top of that, I wonder if the Asian beetles and the native lady bugs run on different cycles. In other words, are the house-dwelling Asian beetles tapering off, and the native ones increasing? That would help explain why there were fewer in the house, but more total bugs last fall. Also, when I was cutting dead timber for firewood, I found thousands of ladybugs hibernating under the dead bark. I was pretty careful with these pieces of bark, since I assumed that these were the native bugs, and therefore, something to hold onto.

    But then again, those swarms last fall!! :confused: Oh, who knows!! ;)

    April