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Now when birds are sick and you give them certain antibiotics, you'll have to throw the eggs away for a certain period of time which can range from 3-5 days. Now I'm thinking, are large-scale egg farms adhering to this policy? Is there any way they get around it? I'm trying to imagine a farmer throwing away thousands of eggs away.
 

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In many, if not most, of the large egg farms, a sick bird may never be discovered until it is dead, and most of the time, a dead bird might not be discovered for several days.
 
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Now when birds are sick and you give them certain antibiotics, you'll have to throw the eggs away for a certain period of time which can range from 3-5 days. Now I'm thinking, are large-scale egg farms adhering to this policy? Is there any way they get around it? I'm trying to imagine a farmer throwing away thousands of eggs away.
That's complicated to answer.

To begin with, commercial chickens are kept "sterile", in a manner of speaking. They are in environmentally controlled buildings from start to finish, with almost no chance of contracting diseases. Tightly enclosed buildings keep out wild birds. Workers are forbidden to own birds of their own (and that includes cage birds like parakeets), and many companies require employees to don sterile disposable clothing before entering the buildings where the poultry are housed.

Chicks are vaccinated before hatching, and sub-therapeutic antibiotics are often given. However, the particular antibiotics used prophylactically are NOT used in humans, thus no fear of antibiotic-resistant bacteria showing up in human populations.

In the rare cases of disease outbreak amongst the poultry, therapeutic levels of antibiotics are given, including those used by humans. In that case yes, there is a withdrawal period, and eggs have to be discarded, or there will be a delay in the processing of broilers.

The good news is, an increasing number of poultry companies are switching from sub-therapeutic antibiotics to probiotics, with good results.

Their birds are never older than a year. They get new, younger hens all the time and toss the "spent" ones.
They are kept until they're two years old.

In many, if not most, of the large egg farms, a sick bird may never be discovered until it is dead, and most of the time, a dead bird might not be discovered for several days.
True.
 
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