how do you

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by suelandress, Oct 8, 2004.

  1. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    propogate blueberries? Will stem cuttings work? Root division?
     
  2. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    I dug this up for you. Don't know about cuttings, but it's worth a try.

    Propagate by seed sown in situ in an acidic, peaty soil. Seeds need light to germinate, and may take more than a year to germinate, at an ideal temperature of 18-24C. Sow seeds very shallow. Grow best in full sun, well drained, sandy, organically rich acid soil, (pH 4.5-5.2). Water is critical from time of planting to dormant stage.
     

  3. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    I figured seed would take forever. However, since I haven't been able to find anything on cuttings and such, I may have to resort to it. Thanks for the info :)
     
  4. Ed in S. AL

    Ed in S. AL Well-Known Member

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    Best thing I have found is to find some one with them already growing. My aunt has a huge patch of Blueberries in her backyard. They send out runner shoots and then start a new plant. I just go over and dig up the shoots that have been growing for a couple of years.
     
  5. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You can transplant seedlings you find around the bushes in the spring.

    Now is the time to take hardwood cuttings. Here is what you do. Now remember that this can be iffy, but if you take enough cuttings you will get some success.

    Find a place with good soil around your home (preferably next to your foundation and behind a bush (not in direct sunlight anyway). Find an old quart sized canning or mayo jar (I save the chipped ones for this). Put a little dirt in the jar and swish it around. This will make it muddy and keep the sun off the cuttings and dry them out.

    Take several 8" cuttings, Be sure to notice what is up and what is down on them. Dip the "down" part in water, shake, then dip in rooting hormone. Make a hole with a pencil and stick the bottom four inches in the ground. Then do the same with three or four other cuttings placing the holes close enough that they will all fit under the glass jar mouth. Put the glass jar on top and forget about it except water around the jar when it gets excessively dry. In the spring, look for signs of leafing--if you have that you probably have roots.

    Good luck.