How do you trellis?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by nandmsmom, Nov 25, 2006.

  1. nandmsmom

    nandmsmom Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,031
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2006
    Location:
    SE Mass zone 6a
    I have limited garden space and am interested in growing more of my vining squashes up instead of sprawling. Last year for my peas and cukes I got 1.5 in PVC pipe and made trellises with string going from top of trellis to a string at the bottom. I'd like to do something similar with my winter squash next year, but I'm not sure that it will be sturdy enough. I like the PVC because its cheap and easy to use, but want something that will hold up to something heavy.

    What do you use? :shrug:

    Thanks

    Heather
     
  2. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

    Messages:
    3,471
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2004
    Location:
    NC
    I do my garden in beds. Each bed is 3 feet by 10 feet. Right down the center of each, longway, is field fence. T-post at each end, and the fence clears the ground by about 6 inches. It's permanent. I rotate beds every year. The fence is there for all things that climb, and doesn't interfere with things that don't, since I have 18 inches planting space on either side. For tomatoes, I simply tie cord to one end, then the other, to tie all plants up at the same time. I'll have several cords at different levels, but it works well for me. So, peas, beans cukes and squash can climb. Potatoes, chard, spinach, broccoli and such...not a problem.

    I'll be making trellises for my gourds this year out of arched stock panels, which might work for you, too. Those I can take down at the end of the season and store. Just get four of those short three foot T-posts...the cheap ones. Pop two in the ground. Brace the stock panel against them, arch it up, and mark where you want the other two posts to hold the other end. Either have a helper put them in, or take the stock panel down while you do it, then put it back. You can use cable ties to hold it to the posts, or wire it. And you can make the arch high enough to walk under, so you can make something like this for a dual garden/child's playhouse...right in the middle of your yard! (extra garden space! Add a climbing flower to pretty it up!)

    Or, just put stock panels in your garden, similar to my fence, for the veggies to climb on. They'll hold up anything the plant can hold on to!

    Good luck,
    Meg
     

  3. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,727
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2003
    I use cattle panels. They can be cut to any length you want or bent into a half circle and staked at each end. I use them for all my vines, including climbing roses. Once the vine covers the panel, you don't see the panel at all.
     
  4. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,655
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    Location:
    northcentral Montana
    I also use stock panels, or old fence panels. I prop them up straight sideways but at a slant top to bottom -- the vines grow up the panels and the fruit hangs down below. Wonderful for cucumbers! The heavier things will need support, like their own sling/hammock. Easily made out of old pantyhose.
     
  5. Zebraman

    Zebraman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    401
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2006
    Location:
    Venice,CA.
    Hey Nandmsmom;The "Hog wire"-cow panel-Concrete reinforcing wire,depending on which part of the country you buy it in.Also if you put it up on a slant,ie:half an A-frame,it will give you a shaded bed to grow things like lettuce in the summer.Re bar is a great support at the high end.I cant tell where you live so specific info is a waste of time.Also large spaces in Hog Wire allow fruit to hang down and grow perfect.I have grown 25 lb. Pumpkins up trees and didn't require slings,just a ladder to harvest.-