How do you train your dogs not to run off!!!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by blazingguns, Jan 14, 2005.

  1. blazingguns

    blazingguns Well-Known Member

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    I am always wondering how people train their dogs not to run off from their property, I only have two, but have to keep them locked up when we are not around as they will go to wander and not come home for hours, visiting the one neighbor who does not like it, or I am so afraid they will get out on the road, there must be a way though, as I see dogs lose at homes all the time, and they never seem to venture!!! What am I doing wrong!!!!!!
     
  2. kabri

    kabri Almst livin the good life

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    Sorry but the only sure way is fencing. I would never sell or place a pup with a home that did not have a fenced area for the dog. :no:
     

  3. Ed in S. AL

    Ed in S. AL Well-Known Member

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    I hook a chain around his, well ya know. And after a few good jerks of the chain on them, turn him loose. He's to stupid to realize the chain ain't still back there.
     
  4. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    I think it works for me by repetitive training, going for regular controled walks or letting them have a good bout of running (to burn off their energy) The older they get the more they stay in the yard. I have one young one now that I have to burn out before letting him out, but still have to keep a constant eye on him because he still has 'puppy brain' and wants to chase anything that moves. He is getting better, but it takes years before you can let them out and expect them to stay in the yard, from my experience. Catching them in the act over and over and over again, disiplining them worked for me with the older ones. I never hit, but use a loud stern voice, and the same disiplin word "NO!".
     
  5. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    One dog won't be as bad to roam as a couple will. My boys roam, but my hubby thinks they're pretty close (we have 96 acres plus the neighbor's behind us). Luckily, the two neighbors we have don't care if our dogs come to visit, but the dogs seem to prefer our woods and creek to the neighbors!
     
  6. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Positive Reinforcement. Lavish them with praise when they are doing something right and they want to please you. Having a dog trained also before another dog is introduced helps them know the boundaries. Walk with them where they are 'allowed' to go, and discourage them from going on their own when and where you don't want them to go. Let the dog know you are their 'alpha' leader in a fun and positive way. Take them places you can for their knowing it's acceptable or 'their' place. that helps,too. have something there to keep them familiar with staying there, such as a little shelter they'll prefer.
     
  7. Vera

    Vera Well-Known Member

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    I think it depends a lot on the breed of dog. My husky will run run run and can't be left off leash or out of the yard, and apparently, that's a pretty breed-specific thing. My Danes are pretty good about staying close on walks, but they'd probably take advantage if they could roam freely at will. My little snow dog always stays close, but that's probably because of her history of being dumped and because she's terrified of it happening again. Sheep- and cattle dogs seem to stay on or close to the property voluntarily, from what I've heard. A fenced yard is the best way to avoid any trouble with neighbors, traffic and the game warden, if you ask me... especially if your dogs are determined to make the whole neighborhood their turf.
     
  8. almostthere

    almostthere Well-Known Member

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    We were very stern with ours, loving but firm. It took a while. He is a stubborn lot, LOL. We kept it up all these years, he's 8 now...and then one day last summer the neighbor(afraid of dogs) came over to let us know the gate had been open for 3 days. He never ran out, not once in those 3 days. He will go out the front door to give kisses to visitors(usually family) but if he makes it to the yard and we say stop thats what he does. All I can say is be consistant and patient. Train to stay even if you fence it. One of hubby's past dogs was trained this way...he would sit at yur side without a leash, and would "inspect" you on demand...he was a good loving dog but he took an awful lot of training to get that way. Good luck. :)
     
  9. Mastiff

    Mastiff Well-Known Member

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    So much of it is the breed and how they were raised.
    Our old lab was a runner she would always take the male lab with her.
    Now that she is gone he sticks around well. The mastiff is real good also.
    They pretty much know their boundries and property lines.
    Some dogs learn this real well others do not.
    Call them a lot when they are out. Reward them for returning. Take them on walks around the property. Call them back when they go off and reward them for coming back.
     
  10. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    I don't think you're doing anything wrong...I think it's a combo of individual personality and breed. As mentioned, Huskies (and their relatives) are difficult. They consider a 30 mile radius to be home territory, so to them it's no big deal to wander cross town as it's still their backyard. Hounds are another breed type that like to wander.

    I've had some dogs who are content to stick around the house and others who'll bolt off at a moments notice. If your dogs are wanderers, it's best to have them kenneled or in a fenced yard while you're not around. The neighbors will appreciate it, and it'll keep the drivers and the dogs safe. There's nothing wrong with a kennel, consider it a playpen! If they stick around the house while you're outside, you're a step ahead of many folks!
     
  11. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    don't know about that "only sure way" some dogs dig , some climb, some even learn to open doors, some bust out windows, some do all of thoses things and more, ask me how I know :D

    My favorite way- Electric training collar, 5 - 3v batteries worth of high power zaps when doggie dear is out of my sight. and "wha-la" dog is loose 24/7 and stays home.
     
  12. Laura

    Laura Well-Known Member

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    I start training when they are young by leashing them and walking the property perimeter. A tug and a "NO" if they try to cross the line. I do this twice a day. I also step out the door about evey 10 minutes and whistle. They get a bite of cheese or meat if they respond immediately. If I have to go find them, they are leashed, drug home, cabled and given no "good dog" attention for a couple of hours. Still, they are cabled when I am not home and at night until they are 3 years old and showing some responsibility. Making sure they have enough to keep them busy at home is also a must.

    I've always had farm breeds and I've yet to see a fence the could contain them when they really wanted on the other side. I've seen these guys climb over 6 foot chain link and farm fencing, negotiate the electric fences and barbed wire, sail over board fences and chew through wire. The only thing that works is training them to want to stay in their yard.

    I don't think there is any way to train a sled dog, hound or hunter to stay in the yard. Some are just natural born runners.
     
  13. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    Install the invisible fence. Put a stubborn dog collar on your dog.

    My German Shepard has been on this system for two years. If I want to take the dog for a walk, I need to put her in the van and drive her over the line. I can't drag the dog off my property. She will chase a rabbit down the driveway and stops like she hit a pane of glass when she gets to the "line". I can shut the system down for weeks at a time and she still dosn't roam.

    I was away for two weeks for a wedding, and a friend came once a day to feed and water my animals. The dog protected my house and my animals during this time. I have the system set up that she can't get into the chicken coop or pig feeding area but can run the rest of the property with no restrictions.

    It will cost you a bit of money, but you will never loose another dog to the road.

    Pete
     
  14. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My dogs are free but mostly do not wander. When I first got our bear/lion/samoyed cross, Auggie, I was afraid that he would follow me when I left the property to go to work, and for a few weeks I tied him up when I would go. But after a while I knew that he would not. He learned very quickly what our property boundaries were. He goes where I go, when I walk. I got him at the pound, and before that he had been tied up in a sideyard in the city, so I think he is very grateful for the 6.5 years of freedom. Sometimes he does get into the road, and sometimes like a typical country dog when he notices a vehicle bearing down on him, he stands int he middle of the road and peers at it and says "Looks like car. Yep. I think it's a car. Yep, it's a car alright..." :rolleyes: He might get runover one of these days. I know you will say I am irresponsible and cavalier, but at least, while he is with me, he is free.

    Our Aussie is a shepherd, and so she guards the family, the ducks, the cat, the pigs even. She is SO devoted to us, especially me, she also doesn't go wandering anywhere. Sometimes I wish she would -- just for the exercise!

    I think it is a breed thing.
     
  15. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    I didn't read the rest of the replies. I will just say BUILD A FENCE! Dogs didn't come with software and automatic perimeters built in. That is why so many of them are run over by trucks and poisoned and shot every day.

    Get on some websites and learn about dogs and they way they think. It will help you understand them better.

    LQ
     
  16. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    I really don't know what the deal is with my Jack Russell and Retriever.They have a Fenced in Back Yard.Some times they go out the Front Door,I will holler at them,they get about half way down the drive,look back at me then kick it into overdrive.They will come back in about 20 minutes.

    I really don't know where they go,most of the time I think they just make a fast circle to see if they can find a Squirrel.If its hot out the go down to the spring for a dip.

    They ride up to the Mailbox with me.The Retriever,rides in back of the Pickup.Sometimes she will jump out but jump back in when she is through checking out whatever.

    big rockpile
     
  17. blazingguns

    blazingguns Well-Known Member

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    Hi, Thanks for all the replies, I can see now where alot of it depends on breeds, the one dog that I have that gets to roaming is a cattle dog, the other that just tends to follow is a part border collie, I do have a yard for them, fenced with chain link, and I thought of that electric under ground type fencing, but we have way to much property to put one up, guess they stay in their yard unless we take them with us!!!!
     
  18. sidepasser

    sidepasser Well-Known Member

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    Neither one of my dogs roam, I have a Great Pyr and a rat terror...I trained the GP to stay on the property by leashing him and walking him around the boundaries daily for a couple of years. It worked, have never seen him take one step over the boundary, although on the backside of the property he will cross the creek, but comes right back. On the frontside of the property where the road is, he has never crossed it since he got lost at six months and had to be bailed out of jail.

    That is when I decided to teach him to stay put and started the daily walk around the perimeter, if he crossed the line, he got scolded. If he didn't try to cross, he got rewarded with a "cookie" which was a liver treat. Now when I say the word "cookie" he comes running and sits right at my feet waiting and of course he always gets a treat.

    The rat terror is hard headed, stubborn, and a royal lovable pain in the rear. She doesn't leave the property as she stays with the old GP. I think it helps to have an old dog to teach the young dog what's what. But if she roamed toward the road, I'd leash her as well. She doesn't leave the yard most days other than to go to the stream to drink and come back.

    You have to take the time to teach the dog where the boundaries are, and if necessary, fence the boundaries. All my boundaries are fenced, but dogs being what they are, they can go under or find a hole somewhere, so I had to teach mine to stay home.

    Sidepasser
     
  19. painterswife

    painterswife Sock puppet reinstated Supporter

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    I have two Aussies and 6 acres. We bought an electric fence that has no wires. You plug it in at the house and it gives you up to a 180 foot in diameter circle of area for the dogs. You can set it smaller as you like.

    It is working great! No fence and no problems. They are left at home during the day and they do not cross the line. They are free to run and play with the circle. When I come home they run up to where it stops and wait for me to cross.

    Not cheap but better than a fence.

    Jill
     
  20. rio002

    rio002 Well-Known Member

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    We have 7 dogs loose all the time--took alot of time to train that group to stay home. I started by training our alpha/leader first and slowly worked on the others. We have a street at the top of our driveway and the dogs used to terrorize the joggers/walkers/cars/ and disappear for awhile. The fact their main way out to trouble was the driveway made it easier. I started taking walks up the driveway, telling the dogs to stay home and when they didn't I pitched rocks at them and yelled to stay home, if I was already on the property waiting for them and the were a ways off/not responding I would pelt them in the hiney with my red rider bb gun--this gets their attention very well and they would come right home not realizing it was me--then lots of attention. A few of our neighbors noticed my rock throwing and then when they walked by the house you could see them pick up rocks to defend themselves lol after a few weeks, I tested the dogs by parking up the road, changing coats, wearing a hat and walking by the house. Sure enough they barked, but refused to come up the driveway, on occasion the neighbors say the dogs will come right to the edge of the property--where the dirt meets the road but will not cross it, just stand there barking and wagging. This has given me much peace of mind and while it tough on the dogs it was easier than going through one of them biting someone again (had a guy walking up on the road while the dogs set and barked at him, I was watching the whole time, the dogs didn't leave the dirt but the guy was so upset the dogs were barking at him, that He crossed On to our property to complain that they were barking and now one of them is biting him--this biter was dh's schipperke--I informed him "Then get off MY property and he'll stop" sure enough the guy cussing the whole way got back on the road and d.o.g. quit biting him lol) We did have one car chaser lab that just wouldn't train out of hiding in the bushes at the top of the driveway and ambushing cars as they past --including mine--she eventually did get hit and didn't make it but she died doing something she loved. Good Luck with yours--I do recommend keeping them up while you're gone if you have picky neighbors.