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I'm planning to remodel my kitchen and am looking for some neat and tidy ways to store a small/medium amount of firewood/kindling/firestarters. I'm thinking of possibly making some built-ins next to the stove for the different sizes of wood, but I'm certainly open to other ideas! Show me what you've got and tell me what you like and don't like about it! Thanks!
 
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I don't have a picture of it, but my Grandmother's house had a pretty big drawer that pulled out into her house, but also pulled outside the house - both directions. You would pull it outside and load it up, and then close it back. Once inside the house, the person could then open the drawer and select the wood from the drawer. I would guess that Grandaddy was tasked with loading it up, and she would feed the fireplace from the drawer? I never saw it in action. But I used to play in the drawer... :)
 

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We stack our wood on the screened-in porch, which we plastic in the winter, so snow/rain can't get in. We used to fill a couple of five-gallon buckets with various wood/kindling. Then someone gave us a metal watering tub--it's maybe 2 1/2 feet high by 18 inches deep by 3 1/2 feet long? Anyway, it sits in the corner between the dog crate and the couch and holds quite a bit of wood! I still keep kindling and newspapers in a bucket, though, otherwise it gets lost with the big stuff.

I like your built-in idea, too. One of my clients has a "wood closet" next to their stove. When you open the door, there is a solid part that goes maybe 3 feet high, so it's like a bin. The wood can be dumped in, and stacked even higher. Then the door shuts, and it is nice and tidy. There are shelves, higher up, for newspaper. Very nifty! :)
 

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We took a kitchen cabinet that the previous owner had built (Amish made) but had discarded. Took the front wood work out of it leaving just an opening, sided it with metal, put a top on it and set it next to the stove. It holds two wheelbarrow's full of wood and also serves as a microwave stand. Our main wood supply is in our barn.
 

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mini-SNB14883

This is what i've been using. Old copper container from the 1950's. It was used as a waterbath in some foodstuff laboratory.

Good things about it are; top of the container can be lifted from the stand by using the handles on each end. Easy to take the container to porch/firewood shed for refilling it. It also fits in the worn kitchen style nicely :)

I usually move it further away from the stove when i fire it up, because even the sides get quite hot. Though it blocks the doorway on the right. Only thing i dislike about the container, but it's got more to do with house layout and small size than the container itself..
 

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I use a canvas sling to bring the wood in, then I keep it in an old canning copper bath boiler like this.. I also use an old Dupont wooden explosive box for the smaller kindling..

I used to just lay it on the hearth next to the stove, but I got tired of constantly sweeping up the trash from the wood. The tub catches the majority of it now..

 

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NJ Rich
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Go on-line and type in "FIREWOOD STORAGE BOXES". The one site i looked at show everything from outdoor 1/2 cord racks to interior nice looking small racks and containers.

You may want to look at a galvanized wash tub as an inexpensive solution. It can be cleaned of any oils on the outside and painted any color you want. The benefit of a wash tub is it contains all the debris from the wood that always comes off and helps keep the area clean.

Our wood pile is off the patio on supported pallets (the pallets are on bricks) and the wood is covered with canvas tarps to keep rain and snow off. During snow storms we fill 6 milk crates with wood and bring then into the house to feed the wood stove without needing to go outside.
 

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I guess you are probably looking at ideas that do not require you to alter your house? But I second the idea of the pass through as mentioned. Basically a hole in the wall next to the stove with doors on either side. open the outside door and fill with wood. Open the inside door to get wood for your stove. If a person seriously uses some wood this is the most practical method, as carrying wood through the door and through the house to the stove will always drop dirt etc through the house, if nothing else from your shoes going in and out. I guess it all comes down to really how efficient you want it to be and how permanent of a change you want to make?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
My cookstove and chimney are in the center of the house. How would you insulate an inside/outside drawer? It sounds interesting, I'm just not keen on a hole in the exterior wall when we can easily have -30F temps at night for 2-3 weeks. The old house is drafty enough as it is...
 

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You could insulate with high density foam. Pass thru would be nice, but we are going in and out so much anyway.
 

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7th, I just have to say, That picture is absolutely beautiful. Real nice setup you have there.
Thank You. Just yesterday I spent quite a bit of time cleaning her and the surrounding area, esp the tile under the rubber mats on the floor. Tile-slippery and cracks,doesn't belong...
 

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Our woodstove is in the center of the room.

We have four 'ricks' [4 foot long by 4 foot tall racks that hold wood], we place them in pairs side-by-side, one pair on either side of the woodstove. About two foot apart so air flows between them, and we can walk between them.

The ricks are warmed by the woodstove, and the warm air generally flows around them.

When one rick is empty we can load it up with green wood, as we burn the wood in the next rick. We rotate which rick is currently supplying wood. By the time we get to the first rick again, it's wood has been effectively kiln-dried.

All four ricks hold approximately one cord of wood total.
 

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Older pic. It's a copper "pot" of some kind. I think the patch on one spot is the coolest. I split kindling over on that little stump of wood.
Not only is that one of the coolest kitchen's I've seen, but I really like that white peculator on the stove. I'd say that's probably the first ever one I've seen..
 

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Hopefully a pic attached. I built a cupboard into the wall that is filled with wood from outside. It fits about 2.5 days worth.
It is insulated, and has a door right beside stove, and there is an exterior door outside. So the wood is in an airlock. Little cold air gets iin. Just a cupboard full.
And tiled floor between stove and wood closet in case you drop anything.
 

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All the old houses around here had attached wood sheds, which is pronounced as one word "woodshed" :). Just an uninsulated area that sometimes doubled as a mud room type area. After electric came in the freezer was sometimes out there. It was the equivalent of today's attached garage.
 

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I use a canvas sling to bring the wood in, then I keep it in an old canning copper bath boiler like this.. I also use an old Dupont wooden explosive box for the smaller kindling..

I used to just lay it on the hearth next to the stove, but I got tired of constantly sweeping up the trash from the wood. The tub catches the majority of it now..

I use the exact same container! Its lovely
 
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