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My potato harvest is about double this year what it has been in the past, and now I need to figure out how to store them. In the past I just stored them in the basement in half bushel baskets with a cover on them to keep the light out. I can't stack baskets, and I don't have enough floor space for more baskets.

I've considered plastic tubs with lids that could be stacked. I found some nice wooden crates on line but I'd have to buy a pallet of them.

If you store more than a few bushels of potatoes, how do you do it?
 

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We have never been able to store potatoes for very long over these many 35 years of homesteading. What I do is can them. Just slice, add some salt water and process in a canner. Use them during the winter..great way to keep them fresh and very useful for years...
 

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We use a cold room in our basement. We maintain the temperature at around 40 degrees, and they store fairly well for fairly long. They always do start to sprout when the days get longer again, and DO NOT LET THEM FREEZE!!! Hoooooeeeeyyyyyy! You do not want that to happen to 2000 lbs of potatoes in your basement.
 

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You can stack baskets if you lay a board /boards on them--of course, the potatoes have to be below the level of the basket tops. Furring strips come to mind as the cheapest.

geo
 

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I had a neighbor that used cardboard boxes, layered them with sawdust and potatoes. She did the same with her carrots. Then she put a flat sheet of cardboard over them for the winter.
 

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Don't have a basement. I have thought of picking up an old single door freezer or fridge and burying it under the house and then putting in some vents in the door to stop rodents and bugs. Stays cool down there year round and never freezes.
 

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I don't have a basement or a root cellar. So I'm looking for reasonable suggestions. I live in the south. Potatoes are harvested by June and it can get rather warm here.
 

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... I found some nice wooden crates on line but I'd have to buy a pallet of them.
If you don't want to buy them, could you build them? At one time, I had a nice woodworking shop set up and built quite a few of them. It's not hard if you have the setup. (I don't right now but sure would like to again.)
 

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We store ours in the basement in milk crates. Each crate gets filled to the handles. The crates are sitting on 2xs and a gap is left between each crate. Second course gets stacked over the gaps of the first for better air circulation.

The sweet potatoes have a similar setup, but I use the plastic bread carriers. They sit in a sliding rack type setup, like a chest of drawers
 

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Our frost line is only 18"; so I've considered leaving all root crops in the ground thru the winter, just make sure there is at least 2 ft of bedding/straw over them.
 

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Where'd you find so many bread crates... did you steal em?
A few towns over, there's a HUGE 23 acre business selling just about anything you can think of. I believe they buy out the total stock of failed businesses.
http://metals.shopjfi.com

Last time I checked (wanting more for onions), they were sold out of the bread carriers, but they do have a few thousand milk crates

@ $1.50 each, you could say I stole em :)
 

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Our frost line is only 18"; so I've considered leaving all root crops in the ground thru the winter, just make sure there is at least 2 ft of bedding/straw over them.

That's what I'd do here--almost. Dig and then bury them in a clamp covered with bagged leaves/straw. It's probably closest to what ma nature had in mind.
 
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