How do you restrain your sheep?

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by elgordo, May 27, 2005.

  1. elgordo

    elgordo Well-Known Member

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    Has anyone used the gambrel restrainer before?What about a sheep "sofa" or sling. Is it really worth a $100 price tag when you only have a few sheep? (At least the gambrel is only $12!) I remember seeing a plan for a homemade sling once - like to find it again. I'd like to save my back so bodily lifting them onto their rears isn't a great option for me! Here's a great joke - does anyone have a squeeze chute/ tilt table they want to give me!?
     
  2. HunterTed

    HunterTed Rockin B Farm

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    Never heard of any of those things. When I want to restrain one I just manhandle it. In fact if it does not rain tommorrow the sheep shearer is coming out to my father in laws ranch and we are gonna shear about 100 head of sheep. I really enjoy it, but I am always the one that has to pull the sheep out of the trailer and throw them and hold them for the shearer. I handle my Barbados and Black Hawaiians the same way.
     

  3. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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  4. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    I'm afraid that I havn't heard of most of these things either. When I need to work on my sheep, including the rams, I handle them myself. There isn't very much of me, I've clocked up over half a century and I don't have a bad back.

    I've had a look at the sites Kesoaps posted - very good and well worth a good read. If you follow those instructions and use your stomach muscles and legs rather than using your back as a crane, you should be able to handle them without too much trouble.

    Ted, can sympathise with you. When the shearer comes, I'm the rousy. I'm lucky enough to have my own shearing set-up and the shearer comes to me but I'm the one having to fill the catching pen, pull the dags out, skirt the fleece and put the fleece into the bale. This guy is 59, doesn't shear full time and can shear a full fleeced ewe in 1min 33sec. - and manages to talk flat tack the whole time. I'm a cot case by the time we're finished :haha: .... but like you, I thouroughly enjoy it - and the beer at the end.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  5. Cat

    Cat Well-Known Member

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    The gambrel does work, but you still have to man-handle (drop) the sheep to put it on, my friend uses it in his flatbed truck when he needs to transport a sheep and doesn't want to have to worry about a trailer. I have wanted one for ages but haven't ever purchased one. I've not seen the sling in use, although I've been told it does work. Now that we're on the subject I have hooves to trim.... : o ( A woman's work is never done!
     
  6. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    I have heard of the squeeze chute/ tilt table,, and boy I like the look of it.
    Been wanting it for awhile. Think Nasco carries a nice one.
    Have added that on my wish list!

    I am a strange one,, I only kept on average 10 ewes, + their lambs and my Rams. All were halter trained at a young age. I would have them follow me into the small pen, halter them, tie them up, and do what ever needed to be done,, worming, vaccines, hoof trimming. Less work for me that way.
     
  7. ShortSheep

    ShortSheep Well-Known Member

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    I've got 2 gambrel's, one for mature stock and a smaller one for lambs. Although I don't use them too often, I find them invaluable when I need them. The manhandling is somewhat minimal, easier than tipping them anyway. Catch the sheep and secure the restrainer around the neck, hook one leg, hook the other and down the sheep goes.
     
  8. Lana

    Lana Active Member

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    If you have more than about 20 sheep invest in a sheep tilt table and save your back.These are the best for triming feet.To drench or do shots try bunching them in a small pen and marking the sheep that are finished with sheep paint.Or make a VERY narrow sheep chute.I mean so they can not turn around.Also if you get more sheep a multi injector gun for shots and worming is a must.we started with 20 or ewes and are up to about 175 sheep.Lana