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I believe the first question should be to yourself: "What is it that I like doing?" Then go from there. If you don't like doing something, but doing it just for the money - you probably won't stick to it. At minimum, you won't be a very happy person.

Then you have to ask yourself "What can I do with what I have to make money?" Most things, but not all, need an investment of some sort.

"Do I need a steady income to pay the bills?" Most people, especially starting out, need outside income.

Having a lot of land creates certain options. Being crafty creates others...Look around you. Your answers are there.

And sometimes, as my former tag line stated: "Only she who attempts the absurd, can achieve the impossible.".
 

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Typical answers are selling eggs, goat cheese, tomatoes at the farmer's market, breeding, timber, etc. And off site jobs.
I won't presume for you, but what most of the threads like this are really trying to ask is "How do I make a lot of money homesteading."
Imagine if the question was "How do I make money living in the city?"
"How do I make money and never leave my apartment?"

The answers are all about the same
Knowledge, education and experience are the ingredients to the recipe.
The activator and what will separate you from the rest is ambition.
The willingness to understand failing is the process to succeeding.
 

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Also: saving money is almost like making money.

Cut your own firewood from deadfall & trees on your property, and your propane bill goes down, leaving you with more money. Grow your own food and save, say, $200 a month in grocery costs, and you have an extra $2400 a year.

Just don’t forget to “pay yourself.”
 

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Also: saving money is almost like making money.
This.
You can live quite well on substantially less if you have the discipline.
If you are considering being a full time homesteader, then do you have time for $120 satellite tv?
I have a relative who complains about her grocery bill, but she doesn't garden. Shops impulsively, no list or meal plans, just dumps waxy boxes in the cart from the freezer section. She and her family eat out about once a week at $50-$75 a pop, then do pizzas on Friday for another $40. That is $350-$450 a month that could go for clothing, tools, equipment, homesteading essentials, etc.
Plenty of folks living well on 30k and doing better than families making 2-3x that.
 

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I was able to make money at the farmers market, but, earning $30 every Saturday for 3 ? months is not a living wage.

On the good side, I have SAVED money by homesteading.. You might have heard that $1 saved is $1 earned? Well if you are in the 25% tax bracket then $1 saved is more than $1 earned, because you do not have to pay the 25 cents tax on it. Multiply that by a lot of small savings and that is helpful to the budget

When the kids were little I planted small evergreen trees at perhaps $2 each, and when they got big enough every winter I harvested a fresh Christmas tree worth $20 every year

Chickens are a financial loss but not a big one, and I do love those fresh eggs.

The garden was the biggest money saver. I quit buying most of the full priced seeds in favor of the cheap ones. The 99 cent packet of seeds at MI gardener will give us more tomatos than we wish to eat, and 99 cents beats $2.99, especially if you wish to buy 15 packets of seeds. And, keep your old seeds. If you go on-line they will tell you how many years each type of seed is viable for and after that time has passed THAT is when you toss the packet.

Do not buy a tiller right off. Yes I have a tiller but I did not buy it the first year that I gardened. YOU SHOULD HAVE A SMALL GARDEN THE FIRST YEAR! For many, MANY reasons start small. Part of it is that you will learn faster if you spend time with every plant and see how it reacts to your care, but also the first year the soil might not be ABLE to produce well, and that has more to do with fertility and pests than it has to do with the gardener.

Last year I harvested about 100 pounds of peaches and pears: this year a late frost killed the blossoms. Such is life, I I am still eating dried pears from last year, though. Generally we eat like kings while spending less on food than the average family

And THAT is where the profit in my homestead lies.
 

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I am sitting on hold with Zelle, so I'm reading HT.

The original concept of homesteading had nothing to do with earning money. It was a way to acquire land on which to build a home, plant a garden, raise crops to feed yourself and livestock, have a little extra to barter and trade.

Many folks TRY to apply the modern idea of making $80,000 a year, working 8:00 to 5:00, spending evenings and weekends watching television to "homesteading." It simply doesn't work that way.

I understand that Joel Salatin makes homesteading look like it's possible to homestead easily, but he has a support staff and has written lots of books that net him cash for travel, etc.

Homesteading is work. Every day. "From can to can't."
 

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I ran my bookkeeping business from home. Husband continued on with his career which involved being away from home a lot. We never sold anything but used what we grew, garnered and collected towards a self-sustaining life.

Because we live in a wilderness territory we know a lot of homesteaders. All have a "regular" job, career or trade. For some it is is self-employment. For others it is 9-5, shift work and full or part time and for some just seasonal. All can subsidize their income with their homestead but none can fully fund it especially if they have children. And here we have universal healthcare so no one has to worry about healthcare which makes things much easier.

We do know several couples who do not work outside the homestead but they are retired with very good pensions after 35 years of working in their careers. All were able to retire at 55 which gives them a lot of healthy and active years for their homesteading. Our neighbour is a nuclear physicist and outfitter and she inherited quite a nice fortune so can spend her time exactly as she wants.
 

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Many folks TRY to apply the modern idea of making $80,000 a year, working 8:00 to 5:00, spending evenings and weekends watching television to "homesteading." It simply doesn't work that way.

I understand that Joel Salatin makes it look like it's possible, but he has a support staff and has written lots of books that net him cash for travel, etc.
Joel Salatin did not work 8 hour days. He worked in town until the land, home, and equipment was paid for, and after a day working in town he came home and worked on his small farm..

I enjoyed reading his books very much. Especially how he explained how he would sell things, and how he gradually built up his farmer's marketing until he could afford to quit his town job
 

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So many ways to make some money on the Homestead---just according to your location and what you consider making money on the homestead is???? I went from making a few dollars a week when I started, to making $100's per week---Just raising chicks and selling---again Location has a effect. I hatched and sold right at 11,000 chicks in 2 1/2 years---bought and resold some grown chickens. I grew a medium garden and sold $100's and $100's of vegetables at the Auction we attended weekly anyway. Of I had a good back I would grow a lot of Jackson Wonder beans---the demand here for hand picked is way High. But Machine picked is about all they can get---Hand Picked would sell a HUGE amount better. I got a friend that plants and sells 10,000 to 20,000 collards a year after the first freeze here as well other greens from his winter garden. My Wife and I have some buildings and sheds and we got into buying and selling Storage Unit contents---we would bring the contents to the homestead and go through them---take a load to the Flea Market or Auction every week. We made some good money, But the biggest help was to set-up some rental lots/mobile homes on the front of the homestead so we have a decent income. So Many things can be done---determine what will work for you.
 

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I didn't say Salatin worked eight hour days. My pronoun "it" referred to the concept of homesteading and achieving high income for low time input. I was less precise than I should have been. I edited it for clarity. Thanks.
 

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We do know several homesteaders who have discovered that they can subsidize their life by catering to those with more money and a different life.

Two have gone into the pet boarding business. One for cats and dogs and the other person just for dogs. They have converted buildings on their property to be perfect housing with all the facilities such as fenced runs and yards. Both are 45 to 60 minutes outside of the main city and airport so still convenient but if they were two hours away people would still use them because of their reputations and their places. Cats are $22 a day or $16 for long term (over a month) and dogs are $25 a day or $20 for long term. So a nice income of $660 for one cat or $750 for one dog for a month. However those running these boarding facilities have the experience with cats and dogs and both are Veterinary technicians. The dog people also train dogs so you can pay extra to have your dog tuned up while you are on vacation. So people are willing to pay for their expertise.

One retired couple we know have green houses and they "sprout" flowers and veggies for the local garden centers and stores. Can't keep ahead of the demand but do not want more work.

Another couple built two cabins on their property and rent them out in the spring/summer/fall to those looking for a peaceful vacation. So far they seem to only get artists and writers but word of mouth in that community has them booked for a couple of years. I am not sure how covid-19 hit them this year.
 

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One retired couple we know have green houses and they "sprout" flowers and veggies for the local garden centers and stores. Can't keep ahead of the demand but do not want more work.
Interesting - I've been thinking of doing that, looks like I'll have to look into it some more.
 

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I made just about enough to pay the irrigation water bill by selling sides of beef.

You could make a little bit by keeping bees and selling honey.

There is a guy on TV who supports his homestead by making expensive hand made knifes. It looks to me like he works long hours doing it. It's not like he is working easier than a townie. it's hard work.

There are ways to bring in dribs and drabs of cash. Not any way to generate an upper middle class income.
 

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I keep a minimum of 5 breeds of chickens. I sell hatching eggs year round and chicks in the busy season.
Also have a 1400 sq. ft greenhouse and gardens. The greenhouse is half hydroponics using the Kratky method, good profit growing lettuce. Have a produce stand and sell whatever my homestead produces.
Produce, eggs, camp firewood bundles, wood smoker chips made from my chipper. Homemade sewn and crochet items, pickled canned goods etc.
Always have logs that I can hire a guy with a sawmill to cut into lumber. Sell 2/3 of it to pay miller, make profit and keep 1/3 for my use.

Or you could just do 2 really well made U-tube video's showing your progress every week and in time it will give you a very good return. ( I just don't want to be out there like that so haven't tried it)
 

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Some homesteaders--out in the sticks, off-grid, harvest their corn and then "store" it in a big copper container. After a time, water "leaks" into it and the corn turns "sour". Then the homesteader lights a fire under the copper container and liquid of some kind boils off the top. Word of mouth has it that the liquid is an organic, GMO free, health aid.......The only reason the homesteader ever has to go to WalMart is to buy another supply of quart jars.

;)

geo
 

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We have beef cattle, meat goats, hay, eggs (very small amt, like 4 extra dozen to sell a week), will have some honey this fall.
We also garden for our own table (a give away to a few family) and cut wood for heating in winter. Our milk cow will be freshening sometime this January so will add on milk, yogurt, and (hopefully) cheese. I don't count the wild food gathered as they are really just treats when we get them.

We also both work full time off the farm. He is a machinist and it has saved us literally thousands of dollars. He can make parts (tractor, bush hog, baler, hay unroller, etc.) at work on the company machines that we couldn't afford to own, but was needed to make/repair said parts.
I work in healthcare as a respiratory therapist. I have seen enough to know when a trip to the doc is truly needed or if I can take care of it at home.
We have twin girls that are 4 years old and my bonus kids (teens, so we don't see them very often, even when they are here. lol) from his pervious marriage.
Believe it or not, we also find time to get away for camping/vacations every once in a while. lol.
 

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How does anyone make money homesteading ??
Same as folks in any sector do by evaluating a market need, taking steps to fill it within their available resources and hedging their bet with other investment income streams.

A worker in a urban job has job income and generally have stock market based savings or income generating accounts.

Folks who turn to agricultural job income do the same on the level within their means but instead of only urban sector jobs and the stock markets, they deal with the more risky commodity market sector be they a modern homesteader or small scale to large scale farmer or rancher.

One advantage of "making money homesteading" is even if only a small holding scale 5 or 6 acre home place, any food or small livestock you raise that lowers your food costs or provides you a little extra money around your regular urban employment by comparison provides more income for you than a small scale farmer who also works a plant job when not working the few hundred acre farm or livestock operation.
 
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