How do you keep the woodstove from being TOO hot?

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by cindy-e, Dec 19, 2008.

  1. cindy-e

    cindy-e Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Woodstoves WORK for heat!
    We do have a back up electric heat system. It is set so that it will come on at 50 degrees. It is 25 degrees outside today, and it is 70 degrees in the house! I am HOT! How do I keep it from being too hot with the wood stove on? Probably a dumb question to those of you who have been heating with wood for years, but this is our first year so I am not sure if there are things that can be done to keep it from getting overly hot in here or not.

    Any suggestions?

    Cindyc.
     
  2. ginnie5

    ginnie5 wife,mom,taxi driver,cook Supporter

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    open the front door!
     

  3. mamita

    mamita Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I hear ya! soooo...my daily plan goes like this. I wake up at 4..hub leaves for work at 6 AM. I let the furnace run two times to take the chill off..then the thermostat gets turned down to 55. when it gets to 57 in here...or better when it is around 3 PM, I light the stove. then it is just right around dinner...warm for watching a bit of tv....and I tell hub ...NO MORE wood at 10, so I'm not roasting. lol I love it warm and cozy, but no way do I want it 80 in here! our house is toasty all night....til that first furnace thingie the next day. when it's a cold weekend...and hub's started the woodstove early...welllll....I go outside, A LOT. :) I let him start the stove on weekends early, but I let it die out and relight around 6PM. I do NOT like it HOT. altho...I'm quite spoiled this year with the heat.
     
  4. kitaye

    kitaye Well-Known Member

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    damp it back as far as possible then place a fan in the door from another, hopefully cooler room, and blow the cooler air into where you need it. The other option is the open a window in the room with the wood stove just a crack to let some cooler air in.
     
  5. halfpint

    halfpint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Usually if it gets too hot, I'm letting too much air into the stove. Easiest way to cool off the room is to use a fan to blow the air into or out of other cooler rooms. But make sure you're getting a good seal when you close the door(s) - you might want to check to make sure the gasket is not loose or twisted, and that your air control lever(s) is/are closed.

    It's been in the 70's here, so we haven't run the woodstove or fireplace insert this week, but we're getting the cold front this weekend so we'll probably crank them back up.

    Dawn
     
  6. jill.costello

    jill.costello Well-Known Member

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    You can also try using greener wood that won't burn so hot.....you use less and it burns longer
     
  7. Tracy Rimmer

    Tracy Rimmer CF, Classroom & Books Mod Supporter

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    Too much oxygen is getting in. Close the air intakes as you would to hold it for an overnight burn. More air = hotter fire.
     
  8. River

    River Well-Known Member

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    Our approach has always been to leave the damper 100% open and only put in enough wood to keep the house as warm as we want it. When it is warm outside, we feed small amounts frequently. If it is cold and windy, we'll load the stove up good and keep it pretty full.

    We do use the draft control at night and if we're gone for an extended period. But when we're home, we let the fire have all the air it needs.

    We've been heating with wood for 18 years, so we're almost novices! :bowtie:

    River
     
  9. Yvonne's hubby

    Yvonne's hubby Murphy was an optimist ;) Staff Member

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    I generally just open a winder, I know, thats pretty low teck, but it works fer me. ;)
     
  10. MaineFarmMom

    MaineFarmMom Columnist, Feature Writer

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    There should be something that controls the air to the stove. Decrease the amount of air it gets.
     
  11. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    Build smaller fires. You dont have to fill it up before you light it. And get an oven thermometer to place on top of the stove so you can learn to regulate the temperature the way you want it
     
  12. cindy-e

    cindy-e Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm trying the air intake thing first. Will let you know how it goes.

    The wood we have may be part of the problem. It has been sitting a long time, and is REALLY dry. But we have to use it up before we invest in more. I will look into green wood next time though Jill

    I should say that the person that designed this did a GREAT job, because what they did was they put the wood stove in a corner with a large brick wall behind and under it. It is a tremendous amount of thermal mass and it just radiates heat back out into the room. I love it. Not too sure how to manage it yet, but I love it. That said, I am sure it is a contributing factor. We have huge glass windows in here, and a sliding glass door, and it is still toasty.

    Cindyc.
     
  13. no1cowboy

    no1cowboy Single male homesteader

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    green wood will cause creosote buildup and chimney fires if your not careful.
     
  14. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

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    Open a window, letting in some fresh air is nice even in cold weather. I have a window behind the stove that I usually keep open during the day and close at night. It keeps the air in the house from getting stale.
     
  15. Sanza

    Sanza Crazy Canuck

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    Like River said - Don't put so much wood in! And let it burn down to coals before you add another block or two. You will soon catch on as to how much and how often to add wood to get the amount of heat you want. Another option is coal, it burns slower and gives good heat.
    If you're using green wood you should have the chimney cleaned every year to be safe, even if you burn dry wood the chimney should be checked and cleaned every year.
     
  16. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Irrelevant now, but isn't the size of the stove something that should be considered when contemplating a wood burning stove purchase? I read the specs of stoves to show that generally the smaller the stove the shorter the period of time they hold a fire which makes sense. Therefore I assume there needs to be a balance of space and size and burn time.
     
  17. thequeensblessing

    thequeensblessing Well-Known Member

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    I will second the caution on using green wood. It leads, quickly, to creosote build up and chimney fire potential. Even if you don't end up with a chimney fire, you will have to clean out your chimney/stovepipe waaay more often, and that's not the most fun job to have. Also, creosote can drip out of your stove pipe and onto the stove, floor, walls, etc. Just a mess!
     
  18. Jesus Saves

    Jesus Saves Well-Known Member

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    I don't know if anyone mentioned this, I haven't read them all, but what type of wood are you using. Some wood burns hotter than others.

    Locust or Hedge or Hickory burns really hot
    Oak is hot
    Hard Maple is moderate

    If you don't want it really hot use
    Soft maple
    wild cherry
    I'm sure their are others, I just can't remember. lol
     
  19. js2743

    js2743 Well-Known Member

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    open the door for about 5 mins then when it gets hot again same thing lol.
     
  20. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

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    Add thermal mass around the wood stove. Then the stove burns hot, heats up the thermal mass which slows down the heating of the house so you don't over heat. The thermal mass (we use stone & concrete) then slowly releases the stored heat to the house. Works like a charm.

    Cheers

    -Walter
    Sugar Mountain Farm
    in the mountains of Vermont
    http://SugarMtnFarm.com/blog/
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