How do you go about extracting the oil from corn or sunflower seeds?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by r.h. in okla., Aug 15, 2005.

  1. Just thinking that if times do get all worse cause of fuel prices and we need to be more self sufficient. Corn and sunflowers grow real good around here and both can be used for different purposes such as human consumption as well as animals. But does anyone know just how to extract the oil from them? How many bushels would it take to make a gallon of oil? Just got to thinking that with all the oil we use in a months time from deep frying to using for ingredients we probably use about 1 gallon a month. How many acres would we have to grow to keep up that demand? Would probably have to cut back somewhere. No more deep frying I would guess.
     
  2. Thatch

    Thatch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    368
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002

  3. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,360
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    MN
    Corn is 5 - 12 % oil, dpending on - new breeds are designed for more oil, the average is probably on the low end of the scale. You should be able to get 100 bu per acre if you can grow corn, typically 150 - 200 bu is a real good yield around here.

    Soybeans is where the oil is tho. they are on average 19% oil, with the rest being high protien meal for feed or food. You get about 35-50 bu of soybeans per acre.

    I believe getting to the oil is easier on a soy or sunflower crop.

    --->Paul
     
  4. Thatch

    Thatch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    368
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
  5. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

    Messages:
    15,322
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Back in the USA
    Electrolux makes extractors from home size up to large commercial sizes. Looks like a sausage grinder on steroids. Uses the same screw mechanism to pulverize the seeds and extract the oil (cold press).
     
  6. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    Rh, The easy way to go about it is to feed the corn to a hog. 2 bushels of corn will get you nearly a gallon of lard plus enough meat to feed maw and the kids for many days.
     
  7. palani

    palani Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,322
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2005
    With soybeans you can press a gallon of oil for every bushel using an extruder and then expelling using a continuous screw press. That still leaves 1/2 gallon of oil left in the meal leaving the expeller (per bushel).

    The extruder is used to cook the soybean and break down cell walls by explosive decompression when the product leaves the extruder at 280 to 300 deg F and 400 - 600 psig.

    With flax seed you need to cold press the seed first in the expeller then extrude and press it again. Flax is higher oil content than soy. I suspect the cold pressed oil has to be refined pretty fast or it might turn rancid pretty fast.

    Forget pressing corn for oil. The oil is in the germ and is too low in content to get anything. Besides, it really jambs up the expeller pretty fast. I would go along with Uncle Will - pass it through livestock.
     
  8. Hey thanks everyone for the websites. I found them very interesting and informative. Okay I'll forget about trying to extract oil from corn and just feed it to the animals. However, I am trying to be heathful and have been cutting down on my high fat foods. So hog lard will be out except for special occasions. Therefore I am trying to figure out how to make my own oil from sunflowers for my consumption, and I think these website have taught me what I need to know. And as I kind of figured it might take a 100 acres of sunflowers to supply my needs all year long. Unless I sneak a few dribbles of bacon grease into the skillet. I guess really I need to cut back on the fried foods as the doc. keeps telling me. Have been thinking maybe I'll buy a big bag of sunflower seed for bird food and try my luck with using a blender as mentioned in one of the websites listed above. Is there any reason why I couldn't use the seeds sold for birdfood?