How do you "bread" a goat?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by ScorpionFlower, Jun 7, 2006.

  1. ScorpionFlower

    ScorpionFlower Insanity prevails

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    We just bought 2 yearlings. One of them will NOT walk ANYWHERE with us without it being a battle. We have a chain collar on her, the choke kind but with a screw thingy on it so it CAN'T tighten to choke. I know you're supposed to be able to control them by pulling up on the collar with it by the ears but she chokes and gags very easily and I hate doing that to her but until we get our electric fence up I have to walk her to the nighttime prison pen we have up against the house just outside the master bathroom window. As long as I walk our other yearly the whole way there I can get her over there, but I still have to fight with her to get her into the pen, then do the same thing in the mornings to bring her back to their pen. In doing this I go out of my way with my freshened yearling as otherwise I would bring her straight to the milk shed. Even my big strong dh has trouble moving Kandiland about. And as I said, she chokes and gags with any kind of pulling on the collar. Pushing her does not work either. Anybody have any idea as to tricks of the trade for "breaking" her so that she'll walk with us? We intend to show her in the future also, but for the time being just getting her where we need her to go would be wonderful!

    Scorpionflower
     
  2. momshobbies

    momshobbies Member

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    Have you tried a bucket so they know they will get a bit of yummies if they come . Just a suggestion. I do it with the horses and my husband gets mad so I will add that clause! Good Luck.
     

  3. Julie2260

    Julie2260 Active Member

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    While holding her collar, grab her tail and gently tug up. I have a stubborn nubian-saanen that I have to do this with when she decides she's not going to walk. Good luck.
     
  4. goatmarm

    goatmarm Well-Known Member

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  5. larellynm

    larellynm Active Member

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    only grain her in that particular pen. For a goat food is a powerful motivator. Only eating in the "prison" pen will become associated with food and positive things in her mind and get her going to the pen. Granted, this only will help for the time being and not exactly get her to like the lead, but if you can get her to walk successfully on a lead to the pen then it will be a small step in the right direction.
    larellyn
     
  6. TexasArtist

    TexasArtist Well-Known Member

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    Just like everybody else said 'goat nibbles to the rescue' I have a goat named sweetpea I've been milking and she's very nervous but she knows when she sees the bucket to go get in the milk stall with almost no problems. I place the milk bucket in through the front. When she's in place I lock her in from the back and start the milking.
    You said something about this one being a new addition to the herd. She's probably stilling learning your movement and if your freind or foe. Use the bucket and you'll be her buddy in no time.
     
  7. cmharris6002

    cmharris6002 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I agree with the treats! Also, you might try leading her with one hand on the coller and the other in the 'armpit' of her front leg. Instead of pulling hard on the coller just use it for control and 'lead' by pulling high on her leg. As soon as she moves forward give her a treat. Keep lessons short and extend the distance she must go for her treat a little each time. In no time she'll want to go with you everywhere!
     
  8. Cornhusker

    Cornhusker Unapologetically me Supporter

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    I saw the title of this thread and was gonna suggest eggs and Italian bread crumbs, but I can see now that it wouldn't help much. :shrug:
    We had a couple boers that didn't want to lead right away, but I'm big enough to just keep walking. If you let them stop you, they'll fight you every time.
    Just keep walking, they'd rather follow than be dragged, and it doesn't take too many lessons.
     
  9. ScorpionFlower

    ScorpionFlower Insanity prevails

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    Cornhusker!! ROFLOL I tried to edit to correct my sp error, but it didn't change it on the main list. I was waiting for a comment about it LOL

    As for everyone else, thank you so much! I'll definately give the treats a try. I've tried the tail thing and it just dont work. The girl will dig her legs in the dirt and try to sit down when I mess with her rear. She's a stubborn thing. As I have to get her both to the prison at night and back to their pen during the day I think I'll try leading her with the bucket. She's not freshened yet, but Belle is and Belle walks with me beautifully. She's also the one that gets put in the milk stand with all the yummies. I haven't really given Kandiland treats as yet. They like oats as a treat right? I have rolled oats that I mix into the milk goat ration. I know I tried tempting her with alfalfa, but that's the same ole stuff they have in the pen.

    Maybe the oats will work. I was just warned to not let them eat too much oats.

    ty all

    ScorpionFlower
     
  10. moosemaniac

    moosemaniac Well-Known Member

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    My goats love the horse treats made by Calf Manna. A couple don't like the carrot, but love the peppermint, and a couple don't like the peppermint but love the carrot, but they all eat one or the other.

    Ruth
     
  11. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    I have a couple goats that will do anything for apple slices and all will follow me anywhere as long as I am holding a plastic red Folgers coffee can. I rattle feed in it and they come running, I can walk them all over the farm. It is easier to train to lead when they are volunteering.
     
  12. boermommy

    boermommy Boer goats and teenagers

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    My bunch will perform on demand for apple and oatmeal horse treats. They don't like tha carrot or the peppermint as much.
     
  13. cmharris6002

    cmharris6002 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My goats will do anything for a peanut, unsalted in shell.
    :dance:
     
  14. ScorpionFlower

    ScorpionFlower Insanity prevails

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    Hmmm, I have apples in the fridge! I'll try that one tonight when it's time for them to be moved.
     
  15. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    I recently attended a goat health seminar that was given by a veterinarian who was raised on a goat farm.
    During the segment where he was talking about giving goats shots and also trimming hooves, he produce a rope "calf halter" and used that to both lead and control the goat. It worked very well!
    If they give you a hard time lift their head up a little.
     
  16. chamoisee

    chamoisee Well-Known Member

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    Get *rid* of the choke/chain type collars. Get your doe a sturdy nylon dog collar. When you lead her, hold the colar high up on her neck, just below her head, and lead her so that you are walking at her side, not with her on the end of a rope or leash. With her head held up high like this, it'll be hard for her to get any leverage.

    And, when she cooperates, don't keep yanking. Relax the pressure <b>as soon as she steps forward</b>. Pull so that the pressure of the collar is behind her head and ears, <i>not</i> on her trachea (which is what is making her gasp and choke).

    Is she a Nubian? If so, they are harder to train IMHO. The Nubians I have met tend to seem, well...sort of dumb and recalcitrant.
     
  17. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    I liked the calf halter because it didn't choke them, and controlled their entire head. They gave up really quickly and cooperated beautifully. BTW, they were Nubians... :) My purebred Nubian is my most stubborn goat. I have a lot of "Nupines" and they seem much easier to handle.

    Edited to add: if you use a nylon dog collar (as I do on all my goats), make sure it is a "break away" collar. It will say on the coller tag that is is not for tieing out a dog. This will help to prevent the animal getting hung up on brush, trees, fencing or anything else they poke their nosy heads into. I've had a couple of them come off and found them just on the other side of the fence where a doe had tried to reach some brush and probably gotten the collar stuck. Gotta love 'em!