How do I paint this stuff, laminent???

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by lacyj, Apr 10, 2005.

  1. lacyj

    lacyj Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    705
    Joined:
    May 14, 2002
    Location:
    Calif, The Mother Lode
    We broke down and bought some laminent type cabinets and shelving material at HD to speed the kitchen along. It's pressed wood with a coating on it. Not sure if it's a laminent, vinal paper or speciality paint. It came in white or pretend wood finish. We want to make it a pale beige with semigloss paint. Can it be done? How do I prep the surface? Is there a special primer that will work? We bought some iron on edging that is plastic, can that be painted?
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Also, how would you attach lace to shelving? I would like to be able to remove it if it gets dirty. We were thinking carpet tape or stick-on velcro or rubber cement...The lace is just laid on the shelf to see how it looks.
    [​IMG]
    What type edging would you use around the pretend wainscoat. We would like to put this on all the doors, to make them look older.
     
  2. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    3,025
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Kitsap Co, WA
    My mother likes to do this sort of thing. She just washes the surface well with Trisodium Phosphate, then sands it just a little to roughen the surface a tad. She puts a white primer on if necessary, which I don't think you'll need. She uses either a roller or a brush. Then she puts down a solid coat of colour A, lets it dry and then, for instance to do a marble-look, she paints on colour B, and then splotches it away with a scrumpled-up plastic bag. I believe she uses oil paint, but I'm not positive. i'll ask her. home Depot often has books on faux painting techniques, and the library will have something ...and of course, the web.

    You'll just have to test a piece of the edging to see if it takes the paint. It also may need a little roughing up.

    i can't really see the lace you're talking about. And it wouldn't be if it gets dirty -- it would be when! :haha:
     

  3. CraftyDiva

    CraftyDiva Is anybody here?

    Messages:
    3,340
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    You might look into a paint made just for plastic, I redid my molded plastic lawn furniture with it and seems to be holding up well. No peeling, or scratching showing. I just had to have red lawn furniture and bought this to do it with.

    It's called "Fusion" and made by Krylon (spray paint), no primer needed just spray and that's it. Dries to the touch in 15 mins, but I'd wait at least an hour to do anything to make sure you get a hard skin on the paint.

    It's not cheap ($6 a 12 oz can), but you may find a deal looking around.

    Check it out......... http://www.dickblick.com/zz014/11/products.asp?param=0&ig_id=6372

    About the lace issue, could you sew the lace to a piece of fabric that would cover the whole shelf with just the lace as an overhang? That way you can just take the whole thing and throw it in the wash.
     
  4. Cindy in NY

    Cindy in NY Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    6,775
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Adirondacks
    Our bathroom vanity had a laminate on it. I got a special primer for it at Ace and then painted over it. Don't remember the name. Sorry!
     
  5. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    19,807
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    We've used Kilz on similar surfaces to good effect. Just put down a base coat of Kilz (which now comes in latex!), then paint over it with whatever color your heart desires.

    My sister and I once painted her cabinets and fridge with something that smelled gosh-awful but worked great. Of course, I cannot for the life of me recall the name of the product. But it was good. Sorry!


    Pony!
     
  6. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    3,025
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Kitsap Co, WA
    Yes, my mother says you use Kilz for the primer. But she also said she's had just as good results using drywall primer paint.
     
  7. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

    Messages:
    28,248
    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Location:
    SE Missouri
    It will be easier and faster and healthier to take the doors off, removing all hardware, and paint outside or in a well ventilated garage/workshop. (You may know this already, but you'd be surprised how many people don't.)

    For the lace, I would do as CD says. Then I would put some of that rubbery shelf liner over the fabric. Just found that stuff and love it. I line the hatching tray floor with it for my new chicks to get a good footing. Suspect it would work real well on shelves too doncha know.