How can I get tomatoes to ripen faster?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by .:Becca:., Sep 21, 2005.

  1. .:Becca:.

    .:Becca:. Well-Known Member

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    I have tons of green tomatoes, but our first frost should be coming in about 4 weeks. Is this enough time to get these guys to ripen? How can I get them to ripen faster?

    My neighbors have told me to stop watering them to speed ripening. Are there any other tips? :eek:

    ETA: The variety I planted was Saucey from Territorial Seed Co.
     
  2. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    1. Clip all new buds/flowers.

    2. Cover with plastic at night to keep heat in.
     

  3. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wait till frost is forecast and throw a tarp over the best ones. After a couple cold nights it warns back up for a few days. (here it does) By then you should be getting tired of them.
     
  4. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Saucey is a 75-85 day determinate variety. The plant is supposed to first set a great number of fruit and then ripen them virtually all at once. There should be few new flowers now to bother pruning. If you have a lot of big fruit now, you may have an awful lot of ripe fruit to contend with in a week or so.

    Also, holding back water will work on a deep-rooted indeterminate but not the shallow-rooted determinates. They don't have much reserve liquid on their small foliage and root systems. I grew several determinates and never allowed them to be thirsty. Both have completed their lives a month ago!

    Martin
     
  5. .:Becca:.

    .:Becca:. Well-Known Member

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    What's the difference between determinates and non-determinates?
     
  6. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    A determinate variety is one where stem growth stops at a certain determined terminal point, usually a blossom or a pair of leaves. There is no foliage growth after reaching that point. After the majority of the fruit have ripened, the plant usually dies.

    An indeterminate variety is one where the stem growth never stops. There is always a bud ready to become another section of the stem. In theory, they will grow forever unless something or a disease kills them first.

    Martin
     
  7. Jack in VA

    Jack in VA Well-Known Member

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    Take a pitchfork and pry up the plants so they are loosened, but still in the ground. This will traumatize them so they will put all their energy into ripening the fruit.