How 'approachable' are buffaloes?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by moopups, Dec 29, 2006.

  1. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Just got instruction to apply spray on wormer to such, do I need to carry a tire iron? Or are they approachable? These are on 80 acres of free range pasture and do not have much human contact. There are also 6 water buffaloes that need such.

    Lucky me, huh?
     
  2. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    Mitch, honey, I sure hope they have a run-through gate system for those beasties, 'cause they could turn you into a damp spot on the ground pretty easily if they were of a mind to do so. :eek:

    I've seen handled ones that were big pets, but any animal that large that's not handled is probably not going to let you walk up to it and pour stinky stuff on it.

    Do we have a matador smilie?

    Meg
     

  3. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    Funny, and quite true, I think. I know a guy who owns a herd of buffalo and he told me they tend to be a lot meaner than most cattle.
     
  4. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    bison? pack a gun!! :rolleyes: honestly take the most beated up truck then drive beside them too get used too the contact. then bait them with salt (may work with sweet feed) from the back of the truck use a spray wand with water the first time then when they are used too the contact and the spray noise you should be good too go. just move slow and don't startle them!worked scary cattle in the past that seemed like bob calves compared with bison! :help: friend used this method too work his bison and "harvest" them, no butcher would take them live after the first time!
     
  5. cowboyracer43

    cowboyracer43 Well-Known Member

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    One of the largest bison ranches in North America is just north of us by several hundred yards. The owners and their ranch managers avoid close contact. They are dangerous. We take in bum lambs and bucket calves and the owner called us a few years ago to ask if we wanted an abandoned baby bison. We brought him to our corrals when he was one day old. He took to a bottle. He lived with two heifers and we were pleased as punch with "Franklin." When he was less than one week, he was already bigger than our youngest heifer and rapidly gaining on the other. By one week, he was pushing down the hog panels that had served us well in containing the heifers. From day one, he attracted hordes of spectators and, after that first week, the next "offer" to purchase was accepted. I will say that Franklin was rapidly becoming socialized to people and he was amazingly affectionate. I was truly afraid that he would love me to death.
     
  6. Jeff54321

    Jeff54321 Well-Known Member

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    I am curious, what is the substance that you will be spraying?
     
  7. horselogger

    horselogger Well-Known Member

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    Mitch...they aren't paying you enough if there isn't a squeeze chute to run them through...have worked with tame Buffalo.....wouldn't consider working untamed ones!
     
  8. Bret

    Bret Well-Known Member Supporter

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    "Ya can't roller skate in a buffalo herd."--Roger Miller
    You cannot even get close and that is good.
    I could not pour wormer on my calves(cattle) in a feed lot this week. Once the first one sees any unusual movement and gets a smell of the stuff, the game is up.
    I will have to run them through the chute. Good luck.
     
  9. whiterock

    whiterock Well-Known Member Supporter

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    People I know with experience say you CAN"T work them. You have to trick them or take advantage of THEIR behavior in some way. BE CAREFUL!!!
    Ed
     
  10. goatlady

    goatlady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My neighbors in SD raise buffs - no way can you spray them with anything, guy. Said neighbors had a corral and chute built of 8 x8 posts and 12 x 2 x 10 rails and when they tried to load a few 1-year-olds that had been sold the first buff busted the chute - 4 rails high and took out a post. They did finally get 1 loaded and that buff tore out the side of the heavy-duty trailer in it's entirety. They are extremely dangerous, can turn on a dime, and kill you in a heartbeat. The herd in Custer State Park has a kill ratio of at least 1 tourist a year and at least 2 vehicles totaled yearly. Nasty, nasty animals. They would hang over my fence line when I was out haying my goats making me very nervous. A gun doesn't help as their skulls are really, really thick bone and bullets just literally bounce off - you have to hit the heart to stop them and even then they can keep going 10-20 feet before they drop.
     
  11. ginnie5

    ginnie5 wife,mom,taxi driver,cook Supporter

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    makes you wonder how the indians managed to kill them doesn't it?
     
  12. Ed0517

    Ed0517 Well-Known Member

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    Ginnie - maybe dig a pit, wait for one to fall in and drop rocks on them or spear them? Supposedly how they killed mastodon or mammoth.
     
  13. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Last year a woman worker was killed by a buffalo at a petting zoo just north of here. I'm assuming the animal was familiar with the woman and she with it.

    Can't you give the animal wormer orally in food?
     
  14. arabian knight

    arabian knight Miniature Horse lover Supporter

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    What others have said, I am in complete agreement with you bet~!
     
  15. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    I would think that if you can build a sub-pen within their enclosure (when they're at the far end) and then put a bucket of sweet-feed with wormer in it in the pen, and close the pen after the first one goes in, let it eat the feed, then paintball him to mark him wormed, and keep doing that till you get the whole herd--I think you'd have to subdivide the pen too--in the foyer, a bucket of undrugged feed--if the wrong (already wormed) bison goes in, you just let him out after he eats that feed. IF an unwormed bison wanders in, close the gate behind, let him eat the lure feed, then open the gate to the wormer-feed, then let him loose when he's finished that.

    I'm thinking this way you could worm them at a distance.
     
  16. Silvercreek Farmer

    Silvercreek Farmer Living the dream. Supporter

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    I saw a small plane flying low and figured he has spraying crops, until I looked a little closer and saw he was spraying the cows! I hadn't seen this before, and haven't seen it since, but that may one way, albeit not the cheapest, to get your beasties.
     
  17. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    what ever you do do not approach them on foot, if your life means any thing to you,
    Our neighbors raise them, you don't work them.
    to butcher them you shoot them in the pasture, and then bleed them out there and then haul them to the locker plant.

    if they need treatment of some type your going to have to figure out some way that does not use require handing them.
     
  18. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    The Indians used handy cliffs around here to kill buffaloes. Run them over, butcher the ones on top of the pile, leave the buried ones and the cripples for the wolves.

    I know one guy who raises them and has a dart gun for giving injections and any other meds. He doesn't get in the pen.
     
  19. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    The Indians used handy cliffs around here to kill buffaloes. Run them over, butcher the ones on top of the pile, leave the buried ones and the cripples for the wolves.

    I know one guy who raises them and has a dart gun for giving injections and any other meds. He doesn't get in the pen.
     
  20. arabian knight

    arabian knight Miniature Horse lover Supporter

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    Yes that is the way they did it for the buffalo and the White man run the Wild Horse's Over the cliffs in the same way to kill them for the dog food companies. There is still a spot along interstate 17 on the way to Flagstaff from Phoenix called "Bloody Horse Gulch"~! Nice road sign to see when traveling :flame: