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Anyone have any experience with those?

I went to town yesterday determined to find one. Sears, Lowes, Tractor Supply, Orscheln's. The only one I saw was a Black & Decker at Lowes. They had two, one with a four and ten amp circuit plus a 55 amp starting function. The second had a four, ten and 40 amp charging circuit, a 110 amp starting function, an equalizing function, desulphating function and an alternator test function.

I'm not sure I know what the "equalizing" bit is all about, but I understand the desulphating process. Not how it works, but what it does. I stuck my tractor battery on yesterday afternoon and ten minutes charge at about two amps was all it would take. I ran one the desulphating function for one 24-hour cycle and put it back on charge. This time it took about a half hour, but was accepting only about a two-ampere charge rate. I stuck it back on desulphate. Book says that if five cycles do not produce satisfactory results your battery is beyond redemption.

Have any of you any experience with these things? Do they produce results?
This charger is much lighter than those I am used to.
Ox
 

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Anyone have any experience with those?

I went to town yesterday determined to find one. Sears, Lowes, Tractor Supply, Orscheln's. The only one I saw was a Black & Decker at Lowes. They had two, one with a four and ten amp circuit plus a 55 amp starting function. The second had a four, ten and 40 amp charging circuit, a 110 amp starting function, an equalizing function, desulphating function and an alternator test function.

I'm not sure I know what the "equalizing" bit is all about, but I understand the desulphating process. Not how it works, but what it does. I stuck my tractor battery on yesterday afternoon and ten minutes charge at about two amps was all it would take. I ran one the desulphating function for one 24-hour cycle and put it back on charge. This time it took about a half hour, but was accepting only about a two-ampere charge rate. I stuck it back on desulphate. Book says that if five cycles do not produce satisfactory results your battery is beyond redemption.

Have any of you any experience with these things? Do they produce results?
This charger is much lighter than those I am used to.
Ox
.................A battery charger is just another function specific 12-14 vdc power supply . The reason it is so light is because it is missing a large transformer with a copper wound core that would provide the voltage\amperage for the various functions it was designed to perform . I've noticed when looking for 12-14 vdc ham power supplys that we are seeing the same thing , they're called switching power supplys , and they're very light weight with no transformer like they were made in the "old" days ! I'm not exactly sure how they electricially function without a xformer , nor AM I convinced they will have the Longivity of a regular power supply with a big , heavy transformer with several windings . , fordy
 

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In these days of $4/lb copper the old fashioned heavy transformer power supplies are a thing of the past.

From the link rufus posted:

Linear versus switching supplies

You all know how a typical linear power supply operates: A heavy transformer takes the line voltage and converts it into something slightly above the desired final voltage. Some diodes rectify it, a big filter capacitor smoothes out the DC, and a series pass transistor burns up the excess voltage, so you get the desired output. A simple control circuit drives the pass transistor to hold the output voltage constant. The circuit is simple and uses few parts, but several of these parts are big, heavy, and expensive. And the efficiency is usually only around 50%, often even lower. That produces a lot of heat, which must be removed by big heat sinks and fans.

The switching approach is totally different: The line voltage is directly rectified and filtered, resulting in about 300 or 150V DC (300 is more commonly used). This feeds a power oscillator which produces output at about 20 to 500 kHz. This relatively high frequency allows the use of a small, lightweight and low cost transformer to reduce the voltage. The output is then rectified and filtered. And now comes the most interesting feature: Instead of just burning up the excess energy, in the switching power supply the control circuit steers the power oscillator in such a way that it delivers just the amount of energy needed. So, very little energy is wasted, resulting in high efficiency (75 to 90%), almost no heating, and a much reduced electricity bill!
 

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I sold commercial batteries for years,I have heard all the claims of those chargers being so great,if a battery is totally dead alot of those chargers won't even put a charge into it.Put an old type charger on with just an on /off switch no fancy digital stuff and they'll charge.As for sulfation short of pulling all the plate packs out and cleaning them which really isn't possible short of rebuilding the battery,desulfating is a myth we've sold chargers that claimed it and stopped stocking them because they didn't produce.
 
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