How about Crabapples?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by moonwolf, Feb 22, 2005.

  1. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    A few crabapples grow here. They are terribly let go and need pruning, but I digress. Some years there are plenty of apples to pick, and the past year were nearly nil. I think the frost got them at the blossom stage.
    One tree that did well was the Rescue crab which had larger and sweeter excellent tasting. They call the apple crabs here instead of crab apples. :rolleyes:

    What about planting up some more for an orchard? The tart small crab apples....are they good for making cider? How about drying? I am thinking when there are large quantities in late August. what to do with em?
     
  2. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I wonder how they would do dried? I find most dried apples rather insipid and think something a little more tart would be good. In fact, I like rhubard/apple pie for just that reason. If you are going to propagate them, will you use grafts?
     

  3. caroline00

    caroline00 Well-Known Member

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    my grandmother used to can cinnamoned apple rings made from crabapples. Those were so good!
     
  4. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    No, I don't use grafts. In fact, most of the 'hardy' apple trees for this area are grafted onto crab rootstock.
    Some I planted were from 2 year saplings. You know, now that I think about their growth, the ones downhill from the chicken pen are very big (about 12'high and wide). They got a lot of manure run off for fertilizer obviously. A wonder all that nitrogen didn't kill them. The trees above the pen where the soil is quite 'clay' and drier are only about 6' high and spindly, and very less productive. I think for the wild crabs the easy way to go is with the saplings. I remember getting them from Richardson's Nurseries from Pontypool, Ontario who specialize in trees and shrubs. When bought in quanity of at least 10, they are dirt cheap, and even cheaper if 50...something like $1.50 at the time. I also planted about 75 non suckering lilacs as a border with similar plants (about 50 cents each then) and now about 10' high.

    Yes, I like the idea of the tarness of crab apples. The only thing is their size for drying. Cider might be a good way for processing large quantities, I'm thinking.
    By the way, that Rescue crab makes outstanding pies and jelly. yum.
     
  5. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    are you talking those little cherry shaped crabs or a small apple?cherry crab is good for jellyand the small apple makes a great drink when combined with other fencerow fruits(have to get the recipie).after boiling the bits are fed to the chooks and compost or pigs if you have them . on the up hill trees try some wood ash and composted chicken bedding. we use wood ash and dog "waste"at the base of the trees and it helps repell rodents and bugs(not sure on porkys as mnr released fischers that have killed them and half the flight birds in the area now they have impoted black bear to controll them!)
     
  6. dreadstalker

    dreadstalker Well-Known Member

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    try making either jelly or apple butter out of them.the tartness is well tempered in the process