Hosta question

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Mutti, Apr 21, 2005.

  1. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    4,440
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Missouri
    How do I divide a hosta?? It is next to a huge one but it never seems to do as well,think too crowded but it is about 6" tall ...want to move to a happier home. DEE
     
  2. tallpines

    tallpines Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,283
    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2003
    Location:
    A woods in Wisconsin
    Hosta are pretty tough.
    Just cut the roots with a shovel...move to the new spot and water well for a few days.
     

  3. weg

    weg Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    84
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2003
    Mutti,I use a butcher knife to divide hosta's.I get more control with a knife than a shovel.By the way hosta plants are one of my favorite shade plants,I have 5 varieties so far.weg
     
  4. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,801
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    South Central Wisconsin
    Mutti, you didn't say what variety is involved. There indeed are some which barely get over 6" tall. Some also spread like crazy while others barely add a single new stem each year. I lost count of how many different I had from little anonymous ones up to Big Daddy. It's somewhere in the mid to upper 20s!

    Regardless, you want to get that little guy away from the huge one so that it can be its own star. You've already gotten good advice for dividing. I've got a square shovel which works great for making straight lawn edges and dividing things. Straight down through the middle of a clump usually does the trick for splitting one in half. Then a regular shovel is used to bring the two halves up. (Or one half if you are just wanting to expand.) For me, best time to do that is right now when the plants are just beginning to break dormancy. Next best time will be just after the first frosts in the fall. Then the roots are ready to become dormant for the winter. If done any time in between, the foliage suffers and often does not recover until the following spring.

    Martin