Horseradish and bush cherries

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by sunflower-n-ks, Sep 17, 2006.

  1. sunflower-n-ks

    sunflower-n-ks Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There was a patch of horseradish growing on my property when I moved here. Last summer was the first summer for me to be here and not knowing anything about it, ended up doing nothing. There are now several healthy looking plants that survived this summer with nothing more than a little water now and then.

    How and when do I harvest it and how do I replant for a better crop next year? And, care tips for next year would be great also. I am in e c Ks.

    There were also several bush cherries growing. Same story as with the horseradish, but I was more aware of them and did get some baggies of cherries off of them. Now, the care thing. They seem hardy, and are growing, but do they need to be pruned, mulched, etc? They may be different varieties because there are slight differences in their growth habit and when the cherries ripened.

    I have rabbits and sheep if either manure would be a good additive to the soil.

    Thanks for any help
     
  2. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    If that horseradish was there before you arrived, then there are possibly some really lovely big roots. Best time to dig is either in the spring, before new growth begins, or in the fall after a few frosts have killed the leaves. A better word than "dig" may be "excavate" as old roots often go deep.

    Replanting is easy. Do nothing! That's all I've had to do as any piece of root will become another plant. However, it's advised to plant the same crowns and some thin side roots right back in the same place.

    This thread reminds me that we're down to the last pint and that won't last the winter. There's a few plants with 4" crowns so we'll be grinding some in another month or so.

    Martin
     

  3. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i was always told that you can harvest horseradish just like oysters...months that have an "R" in them.

    i have always had horseradish growing here in various places. i dug some up in the spring and was a bit disappointed at the root size. it seems the ground was somewhat rocky and the roots did not get very large and they had a tendency to curl and twist in odd shapes and branch out. i removed seveal roots and replanted in a raised bed with soft soil. i am almost ready to harvest some and will see if my efforts paid off.

    that would be my recommendation...plant them in deep and loose soil.
     
  4. culpeper

    culpeper Well-Known Member

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    A piece of root about 20cm long, and the downward end cut on a slant, can be pushed into the ground on a slight angle, so that the top of the cutting will be 5cm below the soil. Soil should be worked down at least 60cm. Prefers full sun and deep, moist, rich, well-drained soil pH 6.8, but will grow almost anywhere.

    Harvesting: Dig up the roots in autumn to prevent spreading, or in spring. Store in the fridge or in a bucket of damp sand in a cool place, or scraped and ground before freezing. Prepare under water to reduce eye irritation. Cut off 2cm of the top of the root and replant it if desired. Best used fresh, as it loses some of its potency when dried.
     
  5. katydidagain

    katydidagain Adventuress--Definition 2 Supporter

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    I know nothing about horseradish and not much more about bush cherries except I've grown them for over 20 years. For years I didn't know what to do but left to their own devices they grow about 12 to 15' tall. My 2 original bushes have developed suckers along with dead wood and are not very productive; I now prune after they produce and I prune hard. I probably started too late.

    Sand cherries have nice seedlings which seem to come true and set fruit in about 3 or 4 years. If my original stand wasn't for a screen, I'd probably rip them out and replace with the babies scattered around my property. (I get cherries from them.)

    Probably didn't answer anything...sorry.
     
  6. sunflower-n-ks

    sunflower-n-ks Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks to all for the advice on the horseradish. "Excavate?" How deep do the roots go? Do the roots retain their flavor when frozen?

    Bush cherries - Thanks Katydidonce, You did answer some of my questions about them. I have seen shoots growing away from the bushes and didn't know if to leave them or not. Do you prune in the spring or fall? These did not seem to be hurt by the cold last winter, but it was a mild winter. They have grown a lot since I have been here, so I assume they are young plants.
     
  7. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    My soil is quite loose and deep where the horseradish is growing. I can generally figure on finding 2' long main roots. You will never find the end since total depth of the roots may be almost 15'. That's one reason why one can not easily get rid of them.

    Although we only store our jars in the refrigerator, prepared horseradish is supposed to last indefinitely in a freezer.

    Martin
     
  8. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    what do you add to horsey sauce to prevent browning?
     
  9. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Use 5% white vinegar. I use it straight but may be diluted 50/50 with water. If you are using a blender, use that for your liquid base to aid in chopping it fine. If using a grinder, sprinkle a little vinegar into the finished product as you go. You won't need much, just enough to dampen it a bit. If you plan to make a lot and keep it in the fridge for a long time rather than freezing it, make certain that the jars are topped off with vinegar to prevent the top layer from drying out and browning.

    Martin