Horse Slaughter New twist

Discussion in 'Equine' started by haypoint, Mar 18, 2018.

  1. stachoviak@msn.

    stachoviak@msn. Well-Known Member

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    I live just about 20 miles from what used to be
    Fromm Fur Farm..
    they no longer raise mink and foxes. but at one time they were the largest in the country.
    they used to buy horses by the box car load.
    herd them up the highway about 15 miles and slaughter them.. old, young, firm and non firm..
    local farmers would sell their old or sickly worn out horses to Fromms. often they would trade for a healthier one..
    Fromms built a large grinder. they would kill a horse or a cow and push it whole, into the grinder.
    there were a few smaller fur farms in the area.
    they also slaughtered horses.
    there is no point to this post other than to point out that horses have been feed for almost a century..

    registering horses will do nothing to curb the sale for food. If they are paying $10,ooo.oo already, what difference is a few bucks more for papers ??

    I knew about the shipping to Canada a long time ago.
     
  2. Michael W. Smith

    Michael W. Smith Well-Known Member

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    Did they skin them before putting it into the grinder?
    Now that would be something to work there doing that. I could see serial killers getting a job there and coming in to "work" early to get rid of their latest victims.

    Why does my brain think like this?!?
     
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  3. haypoint

    haypoint Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate Supporter

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    You have a far different memory than most.
    Yes, horses have been sold for food for a very long time. However, in the US it has never been the preferred meat. Horses going to slaughter have always been the cheapest horses, the old, sick, lame or crazy. Young health horses have more value as riding or driving or work horses and were mostly priced out of the reach of the kill buyers.
    Much of the horse meat produced in the US was shipped to eastern Canada, Europe and a bit to Mexico. A decade or so ago, US citizens were effective in stopping the slaughter of horses in the US. The idea was to stop the cruel treatment of horses. It was misguided and resulted in a drop in the value of all horses and created a horse shipping industry.
    Another misguided attempt to "rescue" horses has turned kill buyers into horse dealers. They are buying both useable and unusable horses, calling them kill horses and kind hearted folks rush in to "rescue" them from the kill pen.
    The twist that I started this thread with is the growing of quality, young, healthy, often registered Percheron colts with the single specific purpose of being fed. To me, and many others, that is a significant change. IMHO, we need a place for old, sick, crazy or lame horses to be used. I'm fine with horse slaughter for those cull horses.
    The annual number of Percheron colts is small. For a few hundred colds to be diverted to slaughter eliminates entire breeding lines. The market for colts and yearlings has been maintained at a level that permits people an opportunity to grow, train, develop these horses and sell as useable draft horses.
    But this new market has driven the price up 300%, out of the range for most colt buyers. It remains to be seen if the horse trainers can outbid the meat buyers or if the meat buyers will continue to outbid those that make these horses useful.
    Shipping of old, sick, lame or crazy horses to Canadian slaughter facilities, Mexico, too, is common. Shipping young, healthy draft colts to Canadian feed lots for the Japanese meat market is new.
    Most mink and fox farms utilized dead livestock. The huge cattle slaughter facilities in Green Bay receive down or dead cattle that cannot enter the human food chain. They went to the mink or fox farms. Very few such facilities exist and those cows get buried.
    All across the land, Rendering facilities gather dead cattle, guts, heads, feet and excess fat from farms and slaughter facilities. They grind it up and cook it. They provide the basics for pet food, chicken food, lipstick and cosmetics. They also reclaim cooking oils. I've visited many such facilities, but never heard of any sort of grinder that would accept a whole cow or horse.
     
  4. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    I wouldn't worry as much about thinking that way as I would the urge to post it online ;)
     
  5. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Part of the problem with allowing horses to be slaughtered for human consumption here is there are few ways to know what medications they have been given as opposed to cattle who are typically raised only for meat.

    If people were raising them under more controlled conditions there would be more of a market.

    When slaughter was allowed it was mostly old and abandoned or injured horses who had been "pets" and there were no restrictions or records kept on the medications that were or could be used.