Horn Problem!!! I need help

Discussion in 'Goats' started by natybear, Jul 11, 2005.

  1. natybear

    natybear Well-Known Member

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    My friend just got her stud boer back, he was leased for a year. And one of his horns has been damaged and is now pointed directly at his head. I can barely fit my finger underneath the tip and we need to change this asap. I have to fix this myself as I don't have the money to have a vet do something and neither does my firend. My thought was to clip and file but I have never dealt with horns before because I disbud. Can anyone please tell me a good way to redirect this horn so poor Eddy doesn't have a head ache in a few weeks! Thank you so much, info on the internet is pretty hard to find about this.

    Natybear
     
  2. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    Get yourself a sturdy pair of lopping shears, sterilize them, and use them to nip the tip of the horn off. A saw would work, too, but the shears would be safer in case he shifts position. If that part of the horn is cold to the touch, he probably doesn't have blood flowing there anymore.
     

  3. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    i always take the sharp tips of the horns off. make sure, as Jen H said, to feel for heat on the horn. no heat, no blood vessel. i think you could probably take an inch off or so, and this will have to be done every so often. also, did you find out how and when this happened, and why the people did not take the goat to the vet? if you dont have people sign a contract saying that they will replace or pay for an animal lost or dead, and that they will pay for any injuries to be looked at and/or fixed by a vet, then leasing an animal can be treacherous.
     
  4. natybear

    natybear Well-Known Member

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    She basically let a friend use him. It wasn't an offical deal. The only reason I am taking care of it is because I fear for him and I feel no one else is doing anything about it, you know before its to late!

    Thank you for all the info, you guys have really helped me thus far!
     
  5. okgoatgal2

    okgoatgal2 Well-Known Member

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    horse hoof trimmers, chop off about an inch, have some type of blood stop powder or something there, JUST IN CASE. and it will have to be redone. for the rest of his life.
     
  6. natybear

    natybear Well-Known Member

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    really? great, is there any chance that it will ever grow normally? or is there some way I could easily, or not so easily, remove the horn all together?
     
  7. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    Horn removal is one of the few things I just have the vet do. Basically what they do is cut the horn off with a wire saw, cauterize it so it won't re-grow and to stop the bleeding (lots of blood and pain involved with this), and sew the skin over so the critter isn't left with a hole down into it's sinuses. If at all possible, do this in the winter so you won't have to worry about fly strike.

    I had to have a sheep's horns removed last summer after one of them broke. It cost $60, so it's really not a huge bill.

    Nipping off the horn won't have to be done that often. 2, maybe 3 times a year tops, unless his horn grows at a freaklishly fast rate.
     
  8. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    You could just use some metal wire to chop some of it off. That's all the advice I can give.
     
  9. okgoatgal2

    okgoatgal2 Well-Known Member

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    word of warning...if you do happen to hit that blood vessel, it will spurt blood like a gusher and you'll have to have something onhand to stop the blood immediately. (flour, cornstarch) i don't know if it will grow straight again or not, i'd think not, depends on where the damage is...whoever said that about vets doing horn removal-that's how i'd do it....it is so traumatic and i'm just not strong enough, anyway.
     
  10. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you want try to build a system to pull the horn back in increments, like the devices used to repair bone.You know the tool that expands the distance.Build a halter to hold the spreader in place. you could give that a try.
     
  11. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    My goat Ivy, damaged a horn. It was got pushed back and started growing right against her head. I held her down and a man at the barn where I was boarding my goats sawed it off with a hacksaw. It squirted blood which a put blood spot on and she screamed like crazy. The whole process took about 5 minutes. Now she has 1 short horn and 1 longer horn, but otherwise she's fine.