Hoop barns

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Jillis, Dec 27, 2005.

  1. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    My dh and I are exploring options for the barn we will need to house our goats operation. A large dairy goat farmer in our area suggested a 50 X 100 hoop barn as our best and least expensive option.
    Any other suggestions out there? Anyone with experience with hoop barns?
    TIA!
     
  2. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    We have a smaller hoop barn - 26x24. It was inexpensive and I think we got more than our money's worth. Relatively quick and easy to put up, very sturdy, looks nice. All it took was a drill, knife, pliers and an 8' stepladder. Wife and I did it with the occasional help from my dad. We do have a small condensation dripping problem in the winter, but it's not a big deal. We store our hay and feed there and do all the goat milking in it. We had a pre-existing 40x60 concrete pad and put it on that. Drilled down and anchored it to the pad itself.

    My only thought is that 50x100 would be considerably more difficult to erect than the smaller one we did.
     

  3. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We put up two small hoop houses. One, 8 x 9 is for the chickens and ducks. We made a ladder out of branches for them. The chickens roost on the branches and the ducks sit on the straw or the lower level of the ladder. this house is situated over the vegetable garden for the winter.

    Our second one is 10 x 10 and shelters the donkeys and the sheep. We had some really bad weather before Christmas and both houses have stood up very well. They are also mobile. In the size you thinking of, you couldn't move them. but, if you made smaller ones and set them together in a line, you'd have the freedom to move them
     
  4. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    we have a 40x60 cover all on a 6 foot wall fits about 300 loose ewes . great air and light .we have half the panels translusent. bit warm in the summer though but the sheep are out in the pastures all day. ours was the first in the area ,now they are everywhere!
     
  5. limey

    limey Well-Known Member

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    I'm assuming it's made from pvc pipe with some kind of cover (like some greenhouses)? Or am I way off base??
     
  6. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    Ours is a metal frame covered in HEAVY green plastic with a translucent skylight. 2 rollup doors.
     
  7. Lizza

    Lizza Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My husband built one for our goats with the help of our brother-in-law in one day for about $300. He took metal hoops like they put in green houses (he had extra ones of these) and screwed metal roofing to the the metal hoops. He then put wood fencing and doors on both sides. I don't know how big it is, maybe 20X30 or so? Inside we split it in half so that when you come in one door you can get to the milking & kidding area (we only have 4 goats and only one is pregnant). There is 6ft dog run fit in there that separates the other area for milling about and getting out of the weather with a door to get into that area. Here's a picture. You can see it in the background. I don't have a better picture.

    http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b275/mstar3daughters/DCP_1465.jpg

    We live in farily mild climate so this works for us. He stapled chicken wire above the wood so that we can lock it up without anything getting out/in. Our one mistake was putting the wood so that an upset goat can butt the wood out from the inside, oops. I guess then a predator can't knock the wood in though? It also can leak and my husband went around and put cauking on all the screw holes and it seemed to fix this problem. We had an ice storm and snow storm back to back and it didn't cave in so it's held up so far.
     
  8. Country Doc

    Country Doc Well-Known Member

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    Don't use pvc. For me it failed. Try this site lostcreek.net.
     
  9. JayinCT

    JayinCT Well-Known Member

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    I put another 20 x 24 up this past summer. I have no problems storing 300 bales of hay, and still have room left for some grain barrels. The only time I get nervous is when we have a wet heavy snow storm. Then I usually go out with a broom or something soft and smack the plastis from the inside. The snow usually slides right off. The only thing I would have done differently would be to make extra room on the sides to plow or snowblow the snow away. During long winters with heavy snow falls, it's going to pile up quite high. I would watch where you buy your kit though. I have seen the inexpensive ones, and they are cheaply made. Check them out well before you buy. I prefer Farmtek for mine. http://www.farmtek.com
    I also tried pvc many years back, it fell down as soon as it got hot in the summer sun. It was a waist of time. As for the problem that someone had with the goats pushing the boards out from the inside, I would just put the wood as you did on the outside, then put some on the inside too, but only go up 3 or 4 feet. Then the animals on the outside wouldn't get in, nor would the goats damage the wood from the inside.

    Jay
     
  10. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    Jay, bless you! I was doing a google this morning for the Farmtek site---but I spelled it "Farmtech"! That is the site our neighbor the Alpaca farmer was telling us about! For hoop barns!

    Morningstar---cute goats!

    Thanks everyone for all your input! Blessings, Jillis!