hoof trimmers?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by dk_40207, May 15, 2006.

  1. dk_40207

    dk_40207 Well-Known Member

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    I don't mean to be so all over the board here, but I need to take advantage of all of these rainy days, and get all of my online stuff done..

    I need hoof trimmers in a bad way. HOWEVER, all they have at the local farm stores are "footrot" trimmers. Are these the same thing? Help!
    Nanny has one hoof that is turning under. It is strange, and since I'm new at this, I may even post a pic of it to see what some verterans might do:)
    But, I need the trimmers, all the same.

    Have a blessed day!
    Christina
     
  2. PLPP

    PLPP Boer Lover

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  3. full sun

    full sun Well-Known Member

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    Hi Christina,

    Foot rot shears are what you can use. And as far as the hoof turning under, you just have to get in there and trim it. Just get the blade in from the back (or anyway you can) and cut. I just keep trimming until the side is flat with the white middle part.

    good luck!

    Jennifer
     
  4. pookshollow

    pookshollow Pook's Hollow

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    I use pruning shears, and sometimes on the really small hooves, I'll use wirecutters. Like Red Green always says "you can use any tool as any other tool - at least once." :dance: I've heard that a tough pair of scissors can work too.
     
  5. midkiffsjoy

    midkiffsjoy Bedias, Texas

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    Make sure you pick up a "hoof pick" from the horse aisle. It will come in handy!!!

    btw....Keep them in the house. I kept the "tool box" in the garage out of the weather and all my stuff hoof trimmers/nippers/hoof pick all RUSTED. In 3 months. I dont know how, but I dont want that to happen to you too. Theres just too much stuff that needs doing on a ranch/farm to throw money away on "replacement" tools. cringe.
     
  6. westbrook

    westbrook In Remembrance

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    pruning shears is what I use.. and I wear a glove on the hand holding the hoof!
     
  7. wooly1s

    wooly1s Well-Known Member

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    Definately wear the leather gloves...and keep your tetanus shots up to date=)

    We've used pruning shears, kitchen shears, $1 store shears (don't keep a good edge, but we don't cry when we lose them, or have them "borrowed" at fair) The best are the orange handled ones through Hoegger Supply (you can google them) for about $16 + shipping. Easiest to do in the morning or after rain when hooves are moist/soft.

    You can probably find good directions on www.fiascofarm.com - they are a great resource for lots of goat questions. We just use the tips of the trimmers to pick the hooves as we go, less to handle, less to drop. You'll get the hang of it in no time at all!
    Once you see the "pink" in the bottom of the hoof, it's time to stop trimming. You won't do significant damage while you are learning as long as you don't cut past the pink, and remember that the bottom of the hoof should be parallel to the hoof band (square and flat on the ground...no sloping feet) If you should go too far, a little turmeric (in the spice aisle at the grocery store) works as a blood stop powder.

    Go get 'em girl!
     
  8. dk_40207

    dk_40207 Well-Known Member

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    Wellllll. We did get the footrot trimmers($18 OMG!). It wasn't too bad, but I was unsure about cutting the white fleshy/catilige type stuff beteen the hooves..? It felt fleshy---so I really didn't want to cut too much of it--but her hooves are still too long and turned under a bit.

    I think I am going to wait until I can get her a tetnus shot, because found out last week that she was due for one. After that....do I cut into the white?

    Thanks!
    Christina
     
  9. full sun

    full sun Well-Known Member

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    No--don't cut the white. First get a pick and work out the muddy mess that covers the fleshy white part. Really, once that mess is out, you can see pretty clearly what needs to be done. I cut so the dark edges (that form an upside-down V) are even with the white middle.

    The way I understand your message, the dark edge of your goat's hoof is folded over and covering the white flesh on the bottom, right? You just need to work your shears into the fold (with the folded edge in-between the blades of the shears), and start clipping the fold. Once you start cutting, you'll be able to get the side even with the white bottom. I think once you start trimming, you'll see there is no need to cut the white part.

    Hope this helps... Don't be intimidated. Once you get going on it, you'll get the hang of it!

    Jennifer
     
  10. Starsmom

    Starsmom Well-Known Member

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    Fiskars makes a nice pair of shears and they are sold at Home Depot, they are made of titanium steel and hold up real well. Cost about $13. I believe they call then shop snips and are probably found in the tool section. I order my online, so don't know where they would be in the actual store.
     
  11. wooly1s

    wooly1s Well-Known Member

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    >>Chuckle<<
    I'm glad you'll be getting your goat's tetanus shots up-to-date!
    >grin<
    I was really thinking about you!
    One of my first attempts to trim hooves, I was young and dumb, and stabbed my gloveless hand with the dirty trimmers. That meant a trip to the doctor, who just about laughed me out of the office when I explained how the injury occurred ("well, you don't hear that every day!" )...not many rural folk around here - or at least not many in his office. Wanted to save you the embarrassment (and possible infection!) But of course you'll be wearing gloves...