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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I was trimming hooves yesterday and one of my wethers had holes in the bottom of his hoof. The solid outer wall was there - but some of the inner soft area was missing in spots - forming holes. I had to dig the manure/dirt out of the holes, but they did not seem infected - they were not soft/squishy or red. There was some smell, but I think it was from the manure and dirt and hopefully not infection. What causes these holes? We are in the PNW - so very wet. The other goat's hooves were just fine. Hoping this is not foot rot, but will check the feedstore for some kind of hoof treatment....
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't have time to take a pic now - working on fencing, but I'll try tomorrow....

Yes, I guess the hole is between the wall and the soft sole. In places, the sole doesn't go all the way to the wall - hence a hole where mud collects. Why is there this gap between the soft part and the wall? Is this a precursor to hoof rot?

Again, I don't see any oozing or any mushy areas. Nothing is red, and there is no limping. Just holes/gaps in the bottom that fill up with dirt.
 

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I'd get some Koppertox and apply it daily. It's a horse hoof med. Green and stains EVERYTHING, but it works.

Also, be sure you have a good high copper mineral supplement or bolus for copper.

This is just what I've learned from reading here and on dairygoatinfo.com plus my two years of experience.
 

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are you giving bo-se shots to your animals?
too much selenium can make the soft part separate from the hoof wall.
if you are dealing with hoof root you will notice it on a very pungent odor.
 

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are you giving bo-se shots to your animals?
too much selenium can make the soft part separate from the hoof wall.
I didn't know that! I was frustrated with my goats hooves and switched minerals and bingo they are all getting nice hard hooves without icky pockets. maybe that was it???? I kept thinking it was just hoof rot that never got real bad. I had a few boers that came with crappy crappy feet and had virtually no hoof wall touching the ground on a few feet. even they are growing out good hoof wall now with my new (as of september 08) mineral mix! one of the few things I didn't like about the new mineral was it had lower selenium levels. glad I gave it a try anyway.
 

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John, a few of mine have little pockets like you have described. No awful smell. When we trim we also rasp or use a 5" disk grinder to make the sole of the foot even.
From the wet Northwest!
 

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On a long goat hoof, there are normal voids where the sole does not grow as fast as the wall. As long as there is no sign of infection, rotting, or lameness, just trim it and leave it be, it was probably normal. Most of the bacterias that invade these hooves are anaerobic anyway so if you trim the area and expose them to air, they die on their own.
 

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I've had the problem too. I use DR. Naylor's Hoof n' Heel or Premier1 brand zinc sulphate concentrate, mixed appropriately (it stings if too strong). I've had good success with those. One of my 4-Hers is trading me some work for a wether. He's making me pallet walkways to combat the eternally damp conditions here in winter and he's covering them with INDUSTRIAL belt sandpaper from his dad's job at a particle board factory. They replace the sandpaper (THICK RUBBER GRIT-goats can't chew it, etc) every 4 days and he gets all he wants. Then the goats naturally wear their feet down as they play on the walkways, etc. I can't wait!
 
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