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i have a 4 yr old daughter that has food and outdoor allergies
we currently do shots and avoidence diet to help control things
i have heard about using honey for the outdoor allergies and was wondering if any one here had tried it and what were their experiences.. :help:
I'm so glad i found you guys
thanks for any responses
 

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The DRs. And my mom had me taking Honey Comb when I was about 7-9 years old - somewhere in there. I'm not sure if it worked but being forced to eat it made me hate honey. Even to this day (i'm 37) I'm not real into using honey.
So yes I've taken it but cann't remember if it helped.
 

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The Dr. had my brother try it also when he as around 7 - 9 years old (he's 48 now) it never did a thing. He still takes allergy medicine to this day since he won't go for the allergy shots. BTW, they say it has to be honey with the honeycomb intact and from your actual living area to do the most good. Who knows won't hurt to try except she may be hating honey later in life... :)
 

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Well, you don't have to force them into the honey. Just make it available instead of cookies, candy bars, etc. When the sweet tooth craving hits, a kid will go for honey if it's available and nothing else is, but if there's chocolate bars, Ho-Ho cupcakes, and Krispy Kreme around then why go for the honey?

We have pretty severe food allergies around my house. Of my four boys and myself, 3 of us are allergic to wheat and two of us are allergic to corn. That means no corn syrup. Next time you're in the grocer, take a look at the list of ingredients and try and find something without corn syrup in it. Now THAT'S a lifestyle change.

However, we see it as somewhat of a blessing. While I do miss the occasional donut, there's worse things in life that not being able to eat processed food.

Getting back to the honey, the bees collect pollen and nectar from LOCAL plants and turn it into honey. Thus, consuming LOCAL honey will then supposedly help your immune system boost its ability to handle LOCAL pollen sources. If you are buying honey from the store then it's not local. Find a local beekeeper and see what you can get. Or better yet, start looking into raising your own bees. They are really easy to deal with and a lot of counties will allow them even in suburbs and communities not zoned for agriculture.

We consume large amounts of local honey at Casa de Ernesto, and we have no problems with outdoor allergies, even my wife who was an occasional sufferer. When I travel to other regions and spend a few days, I'm usually plagued by sinus problems until shortly after my return. I can't say for sure that the honey helps, but it's worth a shot. And it is a general booster for the immune system.
 

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I believe it can help, since your daughter has allergies start out slowly and with local honey. When my children were small I read it was good and and started a tablespoon a day and within a week or so they came down with pink eye this was in the spring. So I would start slowly and this would be a good time to start to let her body adjust and build a resistance before springs comes. My husband and I use honey in our coffee every day. Honey and butter mixed together on toast is really good also. PT
 

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Actually, if you could find whole bee pollen pellets, that would do more good. They are extremely nutritious as well. Claims are made about the human body being capable of living on water, bee pollen and some roughage and nothing else. It is that nutritious. The problem is, some people are allergic to it. You have to start out slow with it. I started with a half teaspoon and added it to my Honey Bunches of Oats cereal in the mornings. You can't tell it is in there b/c of the type of cereal it is. The pollen isn't gross anyway. You can add it to yogurt too among other things. However, I found out that I can't take it. I have IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome) and I hadn't had an attack in a very long time. The bee pollen, for me, causes IBS attacks so I had to stop taking it. My husband can take it just fine and him and I both have pretty bad nasal allergies. You might try it. It should really help a lot if your daughter can take it. Look around. Many honey farmers will also do the bee pollen.
 

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I am a long time suffer of seasonal allergies. When I asked the doc which season, he said, all of them. A few years ago, someone told me about eating local honey, not name brands. Well, I tried it. A teaspoon a day has helped me. I use it in my oatmeal, sometimes in coffee, sometimes, and this is my favorite, I mix it with natural peanut butter and make an evening dessert for myself. My Uncle used kayo syrup, to me the honey is much better, plus I don’t suffer as bad. Now if I go to another region of the country, it is back, until I get home for a few days. I worked with a doctor from Peru, his father was a beekeeper, and they taught him many cures using honey. He does not prescribe them now, but we talked about many. It will help a wound leave a very minute scar. Nothing can grow in the honey is why it is a good cover for a wound. I have used it many times for this, and with a small cut, I have no scars. :)
 
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