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Discussion Starter #1
I would love to know what the difference is in a homestead and a farmstead. And while I am being nosy about everyone's business, I would love to know just where and how long you all have been homesteading (whether or not you still have day jobs!) and what your end goals are. Does this ever work for long? Mine lasted 8 years, but I am hearing a lot of beginners out there on these forums and wonder if there are any oldtimers out there or not!

My goal is self-sufficiency--off the grid, hunt and forage my jungle, grow my meat and fruit and eventually add back my garden and bees. I have no greater satisfaction than sitting down to a meal that I supplied from first to last, preferably in a place I built just my way......

I'm back building up again after giving it up 20 years ago (DH just didn't understand that country life was not a license to sit and watch the weeds grow and DW work in the garden) and have found my center again. But aside from this website, I seem to be out of step with most of the people I know.
 

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A farmstead would be the house and outbuildings. The homestead would include the land as well. Many modern homesteads are smaller than older farmsteads.
 
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My husband must be related to your husband......doesnt understand that work is man's best friend!
 

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I prefer not to be called a "homesteader" because I am simply a rural residenced venture investor who simply pursues some agronomic ventures. I have not worked an industry job since 2001.
 

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I'm sure you'll get lots of different opinions Belle. I view a homestead as being more focused on producing for oneself. A farmstead is (IMHO) a small farm in which there is a focus on market products rather on just how self-sufficient one can be. So we view our home (1.5 acres) as primarily a homestead. On the other hand we have a 42 acre property in which our primary focus is building up sales of crops so that we already have an income stream when we move there. There is currently a small cabin and that will suffice for quite some time to come (not as much focus on the "home" part of things).

Mike
 

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How To Homestead
Lease some land from the Canadian Government, for no cost per acre, then get all the trees cut down on 64 of the 160 acre "Quarter" [Section] - the minimum building "lot" size, then pile and burn the excess trees, remove all the stumps or cut off and then "break" or first time plow that land. Then root pick it, disc it three or four times, harrow it, then pick again, then seed to crop, harvest, then pick again, the following year then seed to crop plus hay.

At the same time, build a log cabin, outhouse, water system or well, prepare and plant a garden and can it, get some hives operating, and raise a faimly, chop 20 cords of fire wood the first year. And have a supply of money available or "work-out" at first. Make everything, use everything, fix everything, understand everything about how things work, think and do for yourself (and neighbour if available).

After about 40% of the land is "proved-up" then you get Title for it, you buy it for $8 per acre from the Government.

Do all of that more or less on-your-own, except for family help, and help of God and Saints and Sages of all time.

Then, that is Homesteading. And that can be done today, by almost anyone with good health and a strong will - if that is God's will too.

As far as "Homesteading"-"Today" goes, I think that those words have some other meaning.

Alex


Neighbour's Cat With Piler


Neighbour's Tractor and Disc


Picking Roots On New Land


Blue, Cabin, and Stars, First Year, Moberly Lake, BC, Canada
 

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OZ

Thanks.

I don't know about the "lease-prove-up-purchase" from the Govenment.

However, three years ago, we bought the new Quarter for $34,000 (about $22,000 USD at the time), it had been logged, with the "islands" of Pine, Spruce, Birch, Diamond-Back Willow, and Poplar still standing that are visible in the images above. Fences on all four sides. We have about 120 acres that we are/can "prove-up" for ourselves, and about 40 wooded that we will never change (see above images - that's what we are doing now).

The $34,000/22,000 that we paid is about equal to todays cost for clearing and fence for 160 acres.

The rest, stump removal or cut-off of stumps, piling, burning, breaking, disc, roots, planting, etc is the same as if leased/proved-up/purchased.

The answer is YES you can, (sort of) Homestead Today (OK its not really Homesteading - but close enf, right, I give up).

Three years ago, we moved our cabin to this Quarter, and started our "Homestead" process over again, after thirty years, life is good.

Alex



You may notice that we now have chosen "power" or gird. Maybe we will change. We did before, and know how to live without power, and we want to use it now, we don't have to use it and if it fails that's OK. However, it works for us. Enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Wow you guys. Alex, thanks for the pictures they are awesome. I would love to have done that. These days I couldn't take the cold weather with my arthritis, but it is just as well as I have a bone to pick with Canada about their new gun laws. I had often thought about moving up there until they did that.

So this is your second time homesteading too? I have never managed without an outside job because of the utilities and feed, five acres just wasn't big enough. I may never make it job-less but I am still much happier.

I am still hoping for more of you to tell me about your adventures. :)
 

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I call my a farmstead. Here for 11 years in Tennesee for 5 years. I raise 90% of the food we eat. Huge garden, cows, goats and chickens. A lot of work, but my family and I love it.
 

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pyrnad said:
I call my a farmstead. Here for 11 years in Tennesee for 5 years. I raise 90% of the food we eat. Huge garden, cows, goats and chickens. A lot of work, but my family and I love it.
Us too, on 42 acres in PEI, and sell a lot too.
I want to KILL people who say "Oh a hobby farm then"
These are the people who eat battery eggs and feed lot beef KNOWING that they are doing so and not caring a bit.
:flame:
 

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Other than in the Homestead Act. A farmstead, in the old sense, was the area in front of all the buildings nearly on the farm, the barn, grainery, corn crib, hog house, chicken houses, house, smoke house ect. This area or yard was, in the old days called the farmstead, Now, of course, the area behind the barn, was called the barnyard. I started farming in 68 or 69 in NE Kansas. I as born raised on the farm my dad still lives on and raises cows on. Hes 87
 
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heritagefarmer said:
Us too, on 42 acres in PEI, and sell a lot too.
I want to KILL people who say "Oh a hobby farm then"
These are the people who eat battery eggs and feed lot beef KNOWING that they are doing so and not caring a bit.
:flame:
Is PEI a country? Is it a state? What is it? Where is it?
 

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michiganfarmer said:
Is PEI a country? Is it a state? What is it? Where is it?
It's the smallest province in Canada (130,000) off the coast of Nova Scotia and new Brunswick.
it's very very pretty.
It's also Canada's best kept secret so don't tell anybody!
 
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