Homesteading in Canada?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Cyngbaeld, May 30, 2004.

  1. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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  2. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Pretty sure that program is ended, (it is a 1970 document!) Bet you could buy land around the Peace pretty cheap though. Check it out in January if you can get in!
     

  3. Janon

    Janon 993cc Geo Metro

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    Even in northern Ontario... you go remote enough and land is basically free anyway. No roads and no electricity makes the land unsuitable for most folks.

    cheers,
     
  4. bre

    bre Active Member

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    Yup, up in the north land is fairly cheap, not givin' it away though. Around the Peace River area there's a warm belt that makes for a good growing season (I think around Zone 4, hey that's warm for us, lol) but everything else is around Zone 2 or lower up there. Mostly small towns up there and oil well sites, pretty remote. If you're going to need to work though, I hear there looking for people to work on the wells, there's a lack of skilled workers and they are willing to train, but other than that I don't think there's much work up there.
    Bre
     
  5. Karen

    Karen Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Cathy N. in (moderator of the Classroom Forum at this site) fairly recently immigrated to Canada. You could contact her for information if your interested in more information. I also know she has done a post on the topic and you could find it using the search option on this forum.
     
  6. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    oops, didn't notice how old that was. :eek:

    in l970 I was just graduating from West Anchorage High. Did stake out five acres near Talkeetna a couple years later, but never had enough money to get it surveyed and let my younger brother take it over. Been seriously considering moving back to Alaska, just don't know if I can afford it.
     
  7. forest_girl55

    forest_girl55 Member

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    ..there used to be a company called Dignam or something like that and they sold remote land, land taken due to non payment of taxes and land without a legal easement to it--very cheap land and they gave a 30 day money back deal on it too--anyone remember or have heard of these guys--they had a lot of land in Ontario..........alternately there is still cheap land in southern Alberta and northern BC........forestgirl
     
  8. Canehdian

    Canehdian Member

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    Yep you bet forest girl...

    It's at http://www.dignam.com/ and you don't even need a credit check...


    TTYL
    Ernie
     
  9. Livingguy

    Livingguy Member

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    Forest Girl and Canehdian, nice website thanks!

    Has anyone here used this website to buy land?

    Are there prices good compared to the other properties in the same area?
    or is one better of roaming around in the area or finding something through local classified?
    Any experiences?
     
  10. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Before putting any money down on Canadian land, call a lawyer or the federal government. I know that we have foreign ownership laws in each province and they do vary from province to province. There are regulations that cover how much land you can actually own and how much time you have to spend here without becoming a citizen. Also, be aware that if land is cheap, it's usually for a reason. It could be a short growing season, an area that is semi arid, poor soil or a poor local economy. It's not that I'm trying to steal your dreams, I just don't want to see you end up losing money or in a bad situation. If you do your homework and find something that sounds good, check with us Canadians and see what we can tell you about the area, actual land values and the economy. We'd all be quite happy to help you out.
     
  11. ....wr is quite right--do check out the legal issues around land ownership in Canada......another great area to look at--- and also very reasonable to buy due to messed up provincial politics is New Denver, Nakusp, the Arrow Lakes, Kaslo and the Shutty Bench area in south central BC. Also check out Grand Forks as there are many old Dukabour homesteads in this area--now abandoned but once the thriving homes of these agrarian based communities.
    My place is near Nelson, BC --zone 5a and I can grow apricots, cherries, peaches and most of the apples, pears, and plums varieties around.
    Up the Slocan Valley is some of the most beautiful land I have seen--rugged and not great for large scale farming but for homesteading and just living in a wild and unspoiled place-very cool.
    There is also quite a well developed alternative community around this area--and lots of folks just doing it simply.

    forestgirl
     
  12. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    forest girl, I looked up nelson. It is absolutely beautiful!
     
  13. pcwerk

    pcwerk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi,
    From what I've heard, you can only stay in Canada for six months at a
    time...then you have to leave, but for how long I don't know. You must
    be rich or have a needed skill to move there. Its a wonderful place
    though. Check out the Gulf Islands off the coast of Vancouver. Just
    the greatest place I've ever been! Good luck.
    James in Houston
     
  14. Montana Mom

    Montana Mom Well-Known Member

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    Another way to gain citizenship is to enter as a live-in nanny type situation. You have to work in a situation like this for 2 years within your first 3 years in the Country (can be diff. employers) and then you are granted to get regular work and then later apply for citizenship. A good way to get to know the area without investing lots of $$ have built in employment and income, etc.

    More info here: http://www.bestplace.ca/
     
  15. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    You don't actually have to be rich and I'm not so sure about the 6 months rule anymore. I know that rule was/is in effect but don't know how it applies if you own land in Canada, especially a small farming operation that requires you attention year round. It would be something I'd check with the federal government. forestgirl makes some valid points. It is wise to do a lot of research because our economies vary so much between provinces. Without some serious homework, you could end up with land that has to possability of resale. Cheap land is cheap for a reason. There are places were a person can live well but don't forget that our climate, which also varies from province to province and be aware that gun control is real.
     
  16. Livingguy

    Livingguy Member

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    WR and Forest girl,

    Just to take an example how would you evaluate the positives and negatives of this property found here:

    http://www.dignam.com/properties/atlantic.html

    "Property 1664-NS
    Lot 9, Plan 97106, Lexington, Inverness County, Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, 25.922 acres or 10.5 hectares. With about two hundred and sixty-five feet of surveyed frontage on the east side of County Road 403, known locally as General Line Road, this treed acreage is just over one mile northwest of the Trans Canada Highway. Basically rectangular, depth of the parcel is over four thousand, three hundred feet. Our information is that there are at least three brooks crossing the parcel, one of which is referred to as the northwest arm of the Inhabitants River. Three miles south is the Port Hawkesbury airport with a five thousand foot runway. Just over four miles distant is the Canso Causeway which spans the Strait of Canso (Atlantic Ocean) and effectively joins Cape Breton Island to Nova Scotia's mainland. Eight miles southeast is the town of Port Hawkesbury where one will find all required goods and services. Because it has one of the deepest ports on the Atlantic, its industrial park is expanding quite rapidly. Cape Breton Island is world famous for its scenic beauty including the Cabot Trail and Bras D'Or Lake, one of the world's largest inland seas, with over six hundred miles of shoreline. Whatever your outdoors interest, you will certainly find it here. Price $12,220.00, payable $1,200.00 cash with order and fifty monthly payments of $220.00 each, and interest; or $10,980.00 (being 10% off) if paid $981.00 cash with order and $9,999.00 within thirty days thereafter."

    I just want to see how your thought process works and what are the issues one should be looking at while evaluating country property.

    Take care

    Living Guy
     
  17. I believe there are only three categories under which you can apply for citizenship in Canada:
    - skilled: you have some in-demand skill or trade
    - family: you have family here and they'll 'sponsor' you
    - business: you have money, they may not word it this way, but thats what it means

    See www.gic.gc.ca for all the info.

    In many rural/remote parts of Ontario, you'd be further ahead buying property with a house and outbuildings already on it. Not sure how it is in Nova Scotia.

    cheers,
     
  18. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    The brother of a friend of mine ones property in BC but he lives in Colorado. That is all I know about that!

    If I were able to work still I could emmigrate since registered nurses seem to be in short supply all over. But to keep my disabilty checks coming I can't leave the states. Would love to move back to Alaska since I still have family there and really loved it, but I would want to live in the Kenai and it doesn't look economically feasible at the time. Oh well, God is still in control, and boy am I glad!
     
  19. Jewels1968

    Jewels1968 New Member

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    Have you tried this site?

    www.northlandretreats.com

    Hubby and I have been looking at this for property up north for ourselves.
    They have some pretty reasonable stuff. Check it out.

    Hope this helps!!
     
  20. Archaeologist

    Archaeologist New Member

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    My husband and I actually bought land from the Dignam company on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. We were told by some of the locals that the reason real estate there is so cheap is the lack of employment. Still, it's a good deal for a vacation property or something to hold onto for retirement. I put up a web page with an account of our experience, if anyone is interested: http://www.archaeologyfieldwork.com/canada.htm

    We did not have any problems buying land as Americans. We found that the property taxes are very cheap (I think we're paying something like $50/year for almost 54 acres, with no structures yet), and we love the area. Dignam has an arrangement where you buy the property unseen (usually they won't show it like a regular real estate agent), and then you have up to 2 years to trade it for something else if you don't like what you've purchased. We were a little bit nervous taking the plunge on something over the internet, but it worked out for us. We initially bought around 27 acres, went up for a visit to check out the land, and loved it.. Then we came back and called them to buy the adjacent lot.

    If anyone has any more ?s about our experience buying land there, feel free to drop me a line (elsinore98@hotmail.com). Thanks, Jennifer