homesteading in Austrailia?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by TedH71, Jan 19, 2004.

  1. TedH71

    TedH71 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Any chance of that happening now? I know the vast majority of the population (last quote I heard was 90 percent) are all on the coasts plus the number of Aussies are very low compared to American people. Am just curious about this since Austrailia has some similiarites to America.

    Ted
     
  2. heelpin

    heelpin Well-Known Member

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    I checked into this a few years ago and things could have changed but at that time it was tough to get into Australia. They use a point system and the highest scorers get in. If you are between the ages of 25-30 and have a degree in something they need and you are healthy, you stand a pretty good chance, otherwise the only way is to deposit at least 1 million dollars in a bank and this runs your score up. I gave up, too old, too dumb and too broke.
     

  3. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    Might ask Don on the computer forum, he's in Australia.
     
  4. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    You could always marry an Australian....

    If you are asking about homesteading in the sense of free land to settle no such luck.

    Land IS quite cheap(comparitively speaking-exchange rate can make you quite well off) and it is suitable for homesteading but taxes are quite high.

    Do a google search for Australian rural real estate.For a nice climate I would go with New South Wales or Victoria or even Tasmania and then you would actually have a winter. :)
     
  5. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    A great deal of Australia is severely dry - think Arizona or New Mexico or parts of Texas. A great deal is very hot - ditto, or Florida, and points more tropical. A great deal of it is both. That's why so much of the population is around the coastline. Not all of the coastline either - a lot of coastline is desert - particularly around the Great Australian Bight (Nullarbor Plain), and on the west and nort-west coast of Western Australia. A lot of coastline is part of areas too tropical to be readily developed, so while it COULD be developed as heavily as Indonesia or the Phillipines, it hasn't been.

    As someone said, they aren't giving land away though. It's tied up - either owned by large pastoral companies (including King Ranch from USA, and Vesteys from UK). A lot is public reserve, and will stay that way - they're buying back leasehold and freehold to add to the public land. And a lot is native people's reserves, which they manage as they see fit - often as pastoral areas.

    For broad sweep and details about Australia check the World FactBook your CIA maintains - great resource -
    http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/

    Note that immigration, as people said, is NOT easy. Australia provides a great deal for its residents. For instance, we have a national Medicare system which pays for (or at least reimburses) most medical costs. Free (taxpayer-funded) health care for residents is a right. There are other social welfare benefits as well. They don't let freeloaders in easily.

    For information about immigration see http://www.immi.gov.au/

    If you have a LOT of money you can come in. If you are sponsored by an employer you can get in, provided the job couldn't be readily filled by an Australian. This is easier in regional Australia (which you would be interested in), rather than capital cities. The major category to which this would apply is medical practitioners or nurses. If either you or your spouse are nurses or doctors qualified in the USA, UK, Canada or NZ then you're pretty well home free. Other places - check it out - qualifications may need to be upgraded. Another area is teachers - particularly science or maths teachers. This is tricky - some of the public school systems (by state) require a local certification in addition to professional degrees. However, private schools aren't so fussy/unrealistic/union dominated, and if you had any sort of a job you would be able to study the local certification by distance education (correspondence and the web).

    If you want a serious winter, choose Tasmania or parts of Victoria or New South Wales around the Snowy Mountains, or New South Wales around the New England Ranges, or EXTREMELY limited high areas of Queensland around Stanthorpe. Some people also say the Atherton Tablelands in Queensland, but I just don't believe it.

    If you don't like freezing your little buns off, don't go there. There's a lot of tropical Australia that could be much more developed than it is, There's a lot of inland Australia which could be more intensively farmed, on a smaller scale, than it is. Dry country, and you need to learn to handle it, but I love it. There's very little land within reach of the coast which is still available and affordable. Strangely, some which is, heavily timbered, coastal, good rainfall, is around Eden. That's a town on the south coast of New South Wales. Near but not in the Snowy Mountains. Definite winter, but not to the extent that your buns would shatter if someone hit them with a stick.

    For anyone from the USA used to the attitudes towards firearms ingrained by the rights in your constitution - get over it. You can still have firearms, but there are definite limitations. Shooters must be licenced, their firearms must be registered, they must be stored safely (specific gun-safe requirements by law), and they are subject to inspection. That said, I don't personally know anyone whose firearms have been inspected, although it does happen. The attitude towards firarms is that they are tools or sporting goods. They are NOT for defence (except for the defence forces). You cannot own a self-loading rifle, or a self-loading or pump-action shotgun (exceptions on VERY expensive licences for professional shooters or farmers for pest control). You cannot own a pistol of calibre greater than .380 (except .44/.45 single-action for Western Action shooters). In fact, pistols are generally for target-shooting use, not for hunting. Fair enough - we don't have bears or cougars - you generally have time to pick up a long arm for anything that needs shooting.

    Note that you can use a special pistol calibre 45/38 which is a necked-down .45ACP. Perfectly legal, if you're licenced. Changed top and barrel on a 1911A. I don't believe everyone who had a .45ACP and is now running a 45/38 actually turned in the .45 parts, although of course if they were to run the old pieces from time to time they'd be limited to casting their own bullets (or running some strange lever-action rifle which happened to feed .45ACP cartridges).

    If you understood that to say shotguns are limited to single or double barrel, you're right, but aren't they all? Almost all are single-shot or side-by-side or under-and-over. However, Australia is making a reproduction of a 189x Winchester lever-action shotgun, and bolt-action is also allowable.
     
  6. Looks like Australia models its gun control laws on the ones used in Massachusetts. How much do the various licenses cost? License to carry are getting steep in Mass.
     
  7. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    Unlikely. How much credibility do you think a gun-control nut would have proposing to other nuts to copy a model used in the USA? More likely they both copied some other model.

    Categories first, then prices, for my state - details may vary for other states, although they try for commonality.

    Category A - air rifles, rimfires, shotguns.
    Category B - centrefire and, so help me, muzzle loader.
    Category C - self-loading rimfire, capacity up to ten shots; pump-action or self-loading shotguns capacity up to 5.
    Category D - self-loading centrefire; or like category C but rimfiire capacity more than 10 and shotgun capacity more than 5.
    Category H - pistols.

    I was wrong about some pricing - I was talking on the basis of what had been proposed, but they must have had a rush of blood to the head and become semi-rational about details.

    License -
    Categories A-D - $75 to acquire, $40 to renew.
    Category H - $100 acquire, $100 renew.
    Categories A,B only - genuine primary production, supported by evidence - no charge.
    Add another category to a license - category renewal cost.

    Category C is hard to get, category D is even harder and liable to be time-limited, leaving you at risk of being unable to get it renewed and having to surrender or dispose of the firearm.

    Other odds-and-sods of minor categories for collectors.

    Also note there are a lot of other weapons and the like prohibited (e.g slingshots, crossbows, blowguns, others) which can vary greatly from state to state.

    Full details for my state at http://www.police.nsw.gov.au , then puddle around until you find "Firearms registry" (there's a "pull-down" list of categories up the top of the page - "Firearms Registry" is the absolute last entry, which may tell you something).

    Incidentally, the Eden I mentioned in my previous post borders on some excellent but VERY rugged deer hunting country. Also feral goat; and although you'd be hard-pushed to get a sight of them, feral pigs as well.
     
  8. Your license fees are not really all that bad but I can see the Australian laws are more restrictive.

    In Massachusetts a concealed carry high capacity handgun permit is $100 and is renewable every 4 years. The permit now requires training courses, a background check and fingerprinting. The permit allows possession of all firearms including semi automatics with high capacity feeding devices (over 10 rounds). A firearms identification card (FID) covers all long guns (no handguns) under 10 round capacity. Cost (I think) is $100.00 and is good for 4 years. You need to take a safety course and there is some sort of background check but it is not as extensive as the handgun check. I think you can still get black powder firearms (cap and flintlock “primitives”) and air guns through mail order without a license.
    All firearms must be stored locked in a safe or with a trigger lock. I think “inspections” would be a violation of certain constitutional rights. New state “safety” laws have also prohibited the sale of many handguns that do not pass a number of state imposed safety requirements. Restricts new handgun sales to a few select manufactures and models and almost eliminates all used handgun sales and makes handgun collecting very difficult. Combined, Massachusetts proudly boast that it has the toughest gun control laws in the states.

    What manufacturer is making a reproduction of the Model 1886/7 lever action shotgun? First I have herd of it but I would probably pick one up if the price is reasonable and they make it to the states. Cowboy action shooting is becoming quite popular here.
     
  9. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    This post got me thinking so I did a search for rural real estate and found this site:
    http://www.aussiefarmsforsale.com/

    For an eye-opener look at these prices and remember this is in Australian Dollars.

    772 acres of bush retreat with 4 dams, rustic brick cottage and cob oven. Cottage has not been finished inside. Areas of thin regrowth that can easily be cleaned up. Very large dam a feature $85,000.00

    (Typo???Seems impossible that land can be $110/acre)

    Beebo 550 acres approx $180,000.00 Brush Creek property with 3 titles and house. Power, riparian irrigation permit for 5 acres. Creek flats to heavily timbered lot. Interesting property with potential for cattle and tourism

    (Sure must be in the middle of nowhere but still...)

    Grazing/hunting
    Situated in the Texas area this property is 4008 acres of perpetual homestead and grazing lease. The country ranges from creek flats to hill tops. Approx 2700 acres is cleared and the balance natural forest. The property would suit Brahman cross type cattle as well as sheep etc.
    There are wild goats, foxes, deer and pigs for the hunters. $380,000.00

    Halfway" Half way between Inglewood and Millmerran we have 600 acres of forest with soils ranging from sandy loam to brigalow...excellent weekender/hunting block/goat farm. Very well priced to sell at $50,000.00

    Almost makes you think about relocating....
     
  10. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    Yep. obviously that is the market they were aiming for. The manufacturer is Australian Defence Industries - ADI - a now-privatised Australian Commonwealth government company which makes the small-arms for the Australian defence forces, and does a lot of contract and some entrepreneurial stuff - arms, ammunition and particularly powder - for the private market.

    You'd have to be the judge as to reasonable of price. Seems high to me.

    http://www.findarticles.com/cf_dls/m0BQY/6_47/74033113/p1/article.jhtml