Homestead life is easy ?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by kellynichole, Aug 1, 2017.

  1. kellynichole

    kellynichole Member

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    Hello I want to know about homestead life, Can anybody please explain its easy or not ?
     
  2. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    It is hard but fun.

    Skiing is not easy, either, but it is fun. So is homesteading.
     

  3. kellynichole

    kellynichole Member

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    Yeah I am trying to learn , but blogs says they people are live homestead life they are eat only organic food , it is true?
     
  4. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Homesteading means different things to different people. Some are more concerned with building a home with their own hands, some are more interested in raising their own food, and others are interested in raising their own organic food.

    We are children of modern times and few of us learned everything we need to know as we grew up. Our ancestors learned this stuff by helping their Fathers as they were growing up but most of us just work at what we care about most, and mostly we learn this stuff as we do it. So, somebody who starts with building a home may be getting their groceries from Wall Mart, whil those of us who moved into an existing house started with gardens, trees, and chickens while we bought the food we could not raise.

    I never worried too much about organic eating, but, the chicken poo has to go SOMEWHERE so I always used it in the blackberry patch, which meant I did not have to fertilize them for a few years at a time, so I suppose you could call them organic most years. I never did it on purpose, I just needed a place to use the chicken poo and why should I buy fertilizer when the chicken poo did the job?

    You can raise your food organically if you wish. Sometimes I do and sometimes I do not.
     
  5. kellynichole

    kellynichole Member

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    Thank you so much @Terri for your wonderful reply.
     
  6. greenTgoats

    greenTgoats Well-Known Member

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    Homeateading is most definitely not easy. Why do you want to homestead/know about homesteading life?
     
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  7. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Do you have a particular dream?

    One of the great things with this forum is that you can get answers from people who have done it. For instance, I had a TERRIBLE time getting the ridgepole up on my greenhouse. It kept falling down when I tried to nail it. If I had know to come here they would have told me to use a bungee cord to keep the end in place while I nailed in on, which would have saved me from picking it of off the ground a half dozen times.
     
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  8. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    Hunter63 saying Hey and Welcome....From Wisconsin....

    What do you consider Hard?...or easy?
    What kind of life do you live now?
    Where do you live? ...In what?...Use for food?...From where?...Do to make a living?...Experience?

    As it stands now I would say....Hard.....
     
  9. kellynichole

    kellynichole Member

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    @greenTgoats I have recently read a article about homestead and I am very inspired from homestead life thats by I want to know more and more about homestead.
     
  10. kellynichole

    kellynichole Member

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    @hunter63 easy or hard for my knowledge, Now I am live a simple life like other peoples.
     
  11. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I am handicapped, now, so I do less homesteading work than most.

    Yesterday I picked a cup of blackberries (not a good blackberry year) and 4 apples that were a bit green. I might as well start eating them now as I think I will have more apples than I can use this year. And, I picked a cucumber and I fed the chickens a couple of scoops of feed and picked up the one egg that was there. My young hens are not laying yet so I only have the 2 hens that are giving me eggs right now.

    I removed some blackberry vines that were trying to grow around my pear tree and went inside. The rest of the day I did inside work, and that is about all of the work I can do in one day. Before I was sick I could do more outside work than that, but times change. Dessert that night was berries in yogurt, the food for the dinner was store bought.

    Tonight I baked the apples I picked yesterday, and of course took care of the chickens, and tomorrow I will finish cleaning up the fallen tree from the storm the other day. i can use the cart and pull it with the riding mower, pick up the remaining sticks, and then ride the mower to the burn pile and throw the sticks on. It was a big job and it took help from my husband and son to get rid of it. I was so busy doing what I could I forgot the check the green beans and now they are over ripe. I expect I will let them get more over ripe and then shell out the beans.

    Back when I worked I would care for the chickens before work and then work the garden and fruit trees when I got home. It was how I got rid of the tension from work.

    This is what homesteading is, for me.
     
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  12. greenTgoats

    greenTgoats Well-Known Member

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    There are really no simple answers. Depends on size of homestead and how fast you build up to it. If you do your research beforehand you'll be less likely to make mistakes.

    We've been homesteading for 3.5 years now. This is what I do in a day:

    Morning:
    Feed the milkers (goats) grain
    Milk the two does
    Collect eggs
    Let the kids out (I separate them from their dams at night so they can't nurse)
    Let the chickens out
    Strain and refrigerate the milk
    Wash pails
    Water the goats
    Water the chickens
    Water the dogs
    Hay if needed (I have 2 different pens that require hay, they eat a whole bake in about a week. So hay 2x per week)
    Slop the hogs
    Water the hogs
    Give the goats minerals (mix loose minerals, kelp, cop sel, zin pro, borax, boss, beet pulp, pumpkin seeds, garlic, nutritional yeast, flaxseeds, sesame seeds, nettle, and red raspberry leaves, and feed it to them)
    Feed chickens and assist with rabbit care as needed
    Medicate animals as needed

    Afternoon:
    Feed dogs
    Pick garden veggies and preserve food as needed
    Work on fencing as needed

    Night:
    Collect fallen apples from the orchard and feed to hogs
    Assist with bunny care
    Feed kids
    Lock kids up
    Milk does
    Lock chickens up
    Strain and refrigerate milk
    Wash pails
    Records

    Then of course there is chicken processing, transportation, vet visits, giving goats copper bolus and selenium e, tattooing and disbudding baby goats, assisting kiddings, socializing new kids, research, planting the garden, string trimming, hauling mulch for the muddy spots in the goat pen, unloading hay, unloading grain, checking bee hives and processing honey, etc, etc.

    All told, it takes me maybe 2.5 - 3 hrs per day.
     
  13. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    IF I can ask, Where are you living at?
    Homesteading/gardening/farming is as hard or easy as you want to make it. My life has been a lot harder than my kids as I chose for it to be that way. They like an easier lifestyle than they had as kids. They both have acreage. Both are lousy gardeners, and my boy is the worst as his wife does ALL the gardening.
     
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  14. IndyDave

    IndyDave Well-Known Member

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    You have asked a bushel basket full of questions for the price of one! In order to get a workable answer, you must take a hard look in the mirror and determine:

    Do you want to get away from the now-traditional rat race for one reason or another?

    Does your idea of contentment not revolve around having a house, a spouse, 2.5 children, a cat, a dog, and a bird all wrapped up in a white picket fence bordering a suburban lot?

    Are you motivated to have a supply of better-quality food for yourself and/or your family (organic or not)?

    Do you like not having neighbors elbow to elbow with you?

    Do you want to be self sufficient to any degree between not going hungry if the grocery store has a supply chain hiccup to being able to go home, close the gate behind you, and tell the rest of the world to go climb a tree and/or being able to survive a complete breakdown of society with what's in your pantry?

    Do you just think it would be fun to have critters that are not considered conventional domestic pets?

    Now, after you consider all of that, how much work are you willing to invest? Even a small garden requires that you pull weeds, water, fertilize, and control pests. Animals require a lot more attention yet. Everything on the place adds to the time and work you will have to do. It can easily become a full time job, or then again, you can confine it to an off-time hobby.

    There are no hard and fast rules, it is just the intersection of the curves on the graph for what you want and how much time and effort you are willing to invest.
     
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  15. CajunSunshine

    CajunSunshine Joie de vivre!

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    It will teach you what you are really made of. And if you stick with it and don't wimp out, you will probably be stronger and smarter than you were when you started. The best road to success is paved with lots of research beforehand, but don't believe every single thing you read and hear. Thoroughly research it, and be aware of websites "parroting" misinformation off of other sites. Some misinformation is repeated over and over...all over the internet!

    You will learn a lot here (and if you are lucky, some people may see the thread and will call bullshoes on erroneous info from others).


    .
     
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  16. GTX63

    GTX63 Well-Known Member

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    As a young man I sat in an office at work one day staring at a paycheck trying to calculate with a 3% raise each year how much I'd be making in 5 years, 10 years, etc. Figuring what house payment I could afford, cars, luxuries. I was planning out the rest of my life based on a piece of paper that would be handed to me every 1st and 15th of the month. At the same time I looked up into another office and saw my boss's boss sitting behind his desk, engaged in an almost daily ritual of pulling out vacation brochures and spreading them out over his desk so he could dream his dream for 15 minutes, anticipating his life in just 7 1/2 more years.
    Today my income greatly fluctuates with no guarantees. I have no vacations and rarely can my wife and I leave the house for more than a short weekend at a time. We have a schedule similar to what greentgoats posted; hard repetitive work without a safety net. But...we love it and wouldn't change a thing. No one can give that to you. Most folks wouldn't tolerate a few hours of what we do before leaving and heading back to bug free and regulated suburbia. You have to want it, and want it enough to realize the struggles and the failure are no more than tools to educate you for the next time.
     
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  17. haypoint

    haypoint Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate Supporter

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    The simple life is not simple. Sitting down to a home-grown dinner, grown by me is the result of a long list of skills and chores. Just the simplest part, the vegetables, requires months of labor, planting, fertilizing, weeding, watering, pest protection, harvest, canning or drying. Enough of each vegetable to last until next season, with extra to cover unforeseen failures. Saving and storing seeds for next year,

    To provide a variety of meat requires raising a variety of animals, turkey, chicken, pork, beef and rabbit. That requires growing grains, developing a hay field with a minimum of noxious weeds. Cutting and drying the hay, building a shed large enough to store the hay and grain. Fence building and maintaining so livestock have feed in the warm months. A milk cow or goat must be milked every 12 hours to provide milk. That also requires the animal be bred and safely deliver their young. Eggs must be gathered daily.

    Wood for heating and cooking must be cut and split and stored to dry.

    A plate with a hunk of beef, a few potatoes, some Swiss Chard and a glass of cold milk and a piece of pumpkin pie, fresh from the wood cook stove, with whip cream topping is the result of an assortment of skills and a year's worth of effort.
     
  18. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    The best advice I can give Is to start at one spot, and when you are done with that bit move on to another bit.

    For example, the first year I planted a garden and decided where I would put fruit trees.

    The second year I planted a garden and planted the fruit trees. And, I planted too many fruit trees.

    The third year I build a tiny hen house, planted a garden, and watered the fruit trees. I also got overwhelmed with everything needing to be done at once and I lost some trees because I missed some watering. I know better now: I will only plant 2-3 trees a year because I can water those no matter what else is happening.

    If you try to do everything at once you will get bogged down with ninety - eleven things that all need to be done at the same time, because you did not know how to time them so that they would not. Even with experience, unexpected things happen, like that tree falling in my front yard just when I should have been picking blackberries and string beans.
     
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  19. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    AND ITS EXPENSIVE. Youll whizz away money on things that you wont necessarly see the overall value in spending it on. seed, feed, fertilizer, fencing, gas, oil, tools, equipment, all the things you don't currently own now that will be needed for a start at homesteading. Whether the tool is a wrench and the equipment is a tiller, they have to be bought, and their use is sporadic. You may use one specific tool for 1/2hr a year, and a tiller for maybe 4hrs a year.
     
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  20. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

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    Homesteading is what you want to make of it. Ask 10 people, you'll get 8 definitions. And 10 opinions on the way to do the same thing.. That's the greatest thing to me about homesteading - you are always learning, and you are your own boss. Well, with the exception of demanding animals needing to be fed, gardens gleaned, fruit picked, sheds built, the list never stops.
    Since you don't know anything about homesteading, just one article read that peaked your interest, read all forums here. You'll see the joys and pathos of homesteading.
     
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