Homestead formation in Western Pennsylvania

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by palongrifle, Oct 30, 2004.

  1. palongrifle

    palongrifle Active Member

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    I have found the funds and am taking steps forward in the purchase of property along the Allegheny River in Western Pennsylvania. This is a very historic and undeveloped area and offers several opportunities for tourism.

    I wish to purchase the property and offer it to suttlers and homesteaders within a historical colonial setting. Re-enactor and artisan paradise. All I ask is that you help with property taxes and improvements to the community based on the number of residents. People visit during limited hours, buy your goods and learn about traditional living.
    Future plans are to offer credentials to college students interested in a great learning environment while offering their sevices to the settlement.

    Any suggestions and comments in this formation stage would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Siryet

    Siryet In Remembrance

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    Please don't ruin an undeveloped historical area with a commercial type operation. :waa:

    I am sure there are previously developed and now abandoned areas (Farms) that would benefit from a dream such as yours. :)

    If you use an already developed area you might save on initial cost of infrastructure and be located nearer to populated areas where potential customers would be willing to drive from to see your operation. :)

    I don't mean so close to a city that you have to be concerned with population growth or expanding urban sprawl Etc. :no:

    Think about it and I wish you great fortune in your endeavors, it sound like a viable plan. :)
     

  3. amelia

    amelia Well-Known Member

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    What would the ownership structure be? Would you retain title, sell covenanted parcels, run it as a co-op, commune, or what? I would think that this would be an key issue, as the ideal of owning one's own plot of land is very important for most homesteading types, and as a practical matter, the enormous investment that you make in a homestead requires an assurance of permanency. Traditional communal models have rarely survived, but I've often wondered if a model paralleling the suburban "covenanted development" concept could work.
     
  4. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    If I understand the concept correctly you'd want ownership retained at least by an incororated holding company or an individual. Otherwise there wouldn't be any control to maintain the settlements original goal over time. I would suggest a holding company and issue private restricted shares, to raise capitol and not lose the benefit the pride of ownership adds to any work. I wouldn't even think of building a tourist attraction for someone elses long term gain just to sell crafts or produce and work all day making it a success. Work for ownership and future profit share yes. What happens to old people that have put 20 years into the place and can't work anymore?
     
  5. palongrifle

    palongrifle Active Member

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    To Siryet,
    The Allegheny National Forest would NEVER sell any of its lands. When I say located in a historical setting, I mean the region (which covers western Pennsylvania and New York and Canada. Yes, George Washington did walk the shores of the Allegheny River as did thousands of Shawnee, Delaware, Senaca Indians. Oil was discovered in 1859 in Titusville - about 40 miles away. The Whiskey Rebellion - Washingtons first orders issued as President happened neat Pittsburgh - about 50 miles south. I intend to buy property now owned by a logging company (near a town) and make a suttlers market and community.

    I really appreciate the comments though - I just returned from Gettysburg - about 4 hours away - I understand the urban sprawl. Officials there however are making the attempt to return the battlefield to its original glory by removing several Tower overlooks and it is rumored that the National Museum (located at the vortex of Pickett's Charge) will be moved off of the battlefield.
     
  6. palongrifle

    palongrifle Active Member

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    To Amelia,
    business and home on the property would belong to the individuals for them to sell in the event that they should choose to leave. Sales could be made back to the community or handled by application to the community. This would be a great way of acquiring some individual capitol as well. If the individual finds property local, they may sell the house, commute to run the business in the community and return home. The business opportunity for the individual would also be protected by screening new applicants to assure that no two stores are competing against each other.
     
  7. joan from zone six

    joan from zone six Well-Known Member

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    i am totally unaware how other similar operations are structured, but, places such as williamsburg, va seem to be well run and universally accepted - perhaps research into their operation will preclude having to re-invent the wheel -