Homestead decor?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by designer, Nov 4, 2005.

  1. designer

    designer Well-Known Member

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    Historically what did people hang on the walls? I know homesteaders didn't go to Walmart and buy mass produced framed art to hang around the house. But I figure women then, like women now, like to decorate their homes to some extent. So what would you most likely see in a homestead? Things they made? Flower wreths or drawings? Just curious.
    Carol M
     
  2. shelljo

    shelljo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you're talking 100 years ago, they hung family pictures (if they had them). Some had paintings and pictures (remember those hair wreaths), some used the walls to hang clothes on. Depended on the situation. Maybe nothing. I know my grandmother never had much on her walls. She married in 1925. I think filling the walls was probably something newish. I know in my GGgrandparents house, there's not much on the walls either--and that house is pretty much as they left in when they died in the 30's. (Their son lived in it till he died in the 1980's and his heirs don't live in the house, so it's pretty much untouched.)
     

  3. dlangland

    dlangland dlangland

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    Wall quilts, but in the old days moreso for the drafty house effect, rather then looks. I suppose it depends on what region of the country you are from, and both my grandmothers were quilters. Deb
     
  4. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Let's see, on our walls we have old rusty saws, old rusty axes, beaver pelt, kraut cutter, snowshoes, old canoe paddles, ice-fishing spear, steel traps (small traps, the bear trap is too heavy to hang), deer antlers, acrtic fox pelt, peevee, lanterns and old rustic signs....stuff like that.
     
  5. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Cross-stitch samplers were popular.
     
  6. justmyluk

    justmyluk Well-Known Member

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    I think most things hung on walls over a hundred years ago were things they used every day. Kind of like what Cabin Fever has, pots, pans, lanterns, saws, ect...
     
  7. GrannyG

    GrannyG Well-Known Member

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    On one wall I have a huge rattlesnake skin on a board with intact rattles, a small bobcat pelt, old rusty barb wire and old wood articles, and on another wall I am working on old,old family photos and documents done in old wood frames. I am having old wood frames made to hold the old documents, such as my DH's great grandfathers will and marraige license.I love old pictures.
     
  8. Jan Doling

    Jan Doling Well-Known Member

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    By the back door Grandma hung the big galvenized wash pot.
     
  9. designer

    designer Well-Known Member

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    Ooooo, wall quilts would be beautiful and fuctional. I hadn't thought of cross stitch either. I can see where the necessaties would get priority on the walls. Maybe most of the pretties were saved for small tables and furnishings. Hand tated dollies and crocheted bedspreads and quilts. I wish I had some things like that from my grandparents. I guess they weren't crafty or didn't pass anything down.
     
  10. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    I don't know historically speaking, what people hung on their walls, but I hang things I use.
    I have some of my musical instruments hanging, my fiddle, mandolin and dulcimer. I have some wall sconces with candles.
    I have an herb box to hang dry herbs and the shelve inside to store other spices.
    Near the kitchen I have my large dough bowl with lid, some large cast iron skillets.
    Close to the back door, I have bridles, halters, shotguns.

    Geez.............I need to decorate!!! :eek:
     
  11. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    I'm kind of fond of maps but my wife limits me to hanging them in the spare bedroom...Which I like to think of as the Den. It's also the computer room, the library, & the gun room. And the doghouse when she's mad at me.
     
  12. jerzeygurl

    jerzeygurl woolgathering

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    a popular thing 100 years ago was flower still lifes made with human hair, from everyone they knew all colors ect. local houses/museums have several
    dont know if you could find a picture of that sort of thing on the internet. its very interesting and pretty, just kinda odd
     
  13. Ann Mary

    Ann Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think that houses "way back then" didn't have too much in the way of deorations except for the "well-off" because no one spent money on them. And many homes were too small to have extras like that by the time all the kids came inside. It was things that could be made like the doileys, quilts, crocheted valences, old blue canning jars full of old buttons, a simple table runner, things like that that were the decorations. A pretty bowl on the table with fruit in it. Nothing fancy. Back then a pretty handmade rocker or a handmade cradle was a decoration they loved to have. I love things like that so tha'ts what I have, along with an old horse collar, old crocks and such.
     
  14. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    mounted fish. Art paintings or prints or photos of the animals or plant life significant around your homestead. A modern idea is to have an aerial photo taken of your homestead property which can be interesting if you have featrues like ponds or woodlot. bull horns, shed deer, elk, or moose antlers you might find, grape vine or willow artwork, hand made rustic picture frames.
    There are so many things that should mostly include the character of your interests or the history, or surroudings of your immediate homestead.
     
  15. hisenthlay

    hisenthlay a.k.a. hyzenthlay

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    Well, thinking back to the descriptions by Laura Ingalls Wilder, what about the china doll that Ma was so fond of? And the curio cabinet that Pa built?

    In historical houses, I've also seen the old, somber family portraits that people had to really splurge on back then. And candelabras, of course.

    On Antiques Road Show you often see very beautiful framed paintings that the woman of the house had done--often a landscape, or a portrait, or study of the family's pets or livestock.

    Wreaths, bouquets, etc. have been popular for centuries, at least.

    Fun question :)
     
  16. BeckyW

    BeckyW Well-Known Member

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    I think back on my grandmother's farmhouse. It was more than 100 years old when I was a child. She had framed mirrors on the walls and lots and lots of family photos. Many of the walls were painted very pale pastels - soft robin's egg blue, lilac, yellow and blush pink.

    The kitchen had an arrangement of metal platters hung on the wall - the kinds with flowers and such on them. (We'd take them down and use them in summer for outdoor "picnics" when lots of family and friends would come over. Funny, we never barbequed. No, food was cooked indoors then brought out to the large picnic tables that were always covered with tablecloths.)

    There was some artwork - foil pictures I guess you'd call them in the upstairs bedrooms. I loved those. They were of scenes in England, as I recall and Renaissance style floral arrangements. They'd catch the light and sparkle from different angles. Hmmm... I need to find some of those. I had forgotten how much I loved those pictures. Thank you for reminding me. I think you've just given me my next antique quest! (Anyone know what that particular technique is called?)

    And every room except the dining room always had vases of fresh flowers (except wintertime - then Christmas cactus took its rightful place!) The dining room didn't have flowers because the dining room table had two beautiful crystal candleabras and a beautiful etched crystal tray that sat between them. When the dining was used in the summer, the tray was filled with fresh fruits from the garden - again, very Renaissance looking.

    While my grandmother was born near the end of the Victorian era, she was raised by a mother by a Victorian mother and grandmother, who even though on a farm, had embraced the graciousness of that era. Sure, there were boots and mud, tractor parts and pigs; however there was also linen and lace, crystal and silver tea sets. (And I am working on recreating it -- except the pigs! :) )

    BW
     
  17. albionjessica

    albionjessica Hiccoughs after eating

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    Handmade curtains are always a welcome, warming touch. Someone already mentioned quilts, but it is worth saying again. Quilts are great for covering up discoloring on walls, or for hanging over windows that get a bit drafty. Dried flowers and herbs, hanging alone or in wreaths. Carved wood images or figures either on the walls or sitting up on the floor or a table. Hand-crocheted/-knit blankets, doilies, and tapestries. Handmade ceramics like plates, cups, vases, pitchers, and artistic creations. Fresh flower arrangements when available. Assorted candle holders attached to the walls or set out on any safe surface. Bookshelves filled with whatever subjects you are interested in, or subjects your guests may find intriguing. A pretty tea set displayed on a shelf or in a curio.

    Up in Alaska, a lot of the families in our neighborhoods decorated with cultural objects like various animal furs on the walls and floors (from foxes to bears), fishing poles and pretty home-tied lures, mounted animals (from whole fish to moose heads), various pins and pretties from local events like Fur Rendez-vous and the Iditarod, carved wood faces hung on the walls (from local trees), and dried arrangements of things like kitty willows or simply some dead twigs put in a fancy ceramic jar.

    Just use things that make you feel comfortable, or making living through the seasons easier. A house will never be a home simply because you fill it with trinkets and whodads. I would much rather have blank walls that I can fill slowly than walls full of collected objects that some hired decorator put there for asthetic effect.
     
  18. crystalniche

    crystalniche Well-Known Member

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    Back in the '50s Grandma had a photograph of their homestead taken from a plane hanging on their wall as well as photos of the family, pretty pictures, clocks, some things they collected and pretty plates. Today I have hanging pretty much the same things! Not surprising really tho. I like old clocks and have several, old and interesting plates, photographs, paintings, prints, old utensils and tools and anything that I come across that I think will look good hanging there. Something interesting that I learned from a friend who is from the Ukaraine (sp?) where it gets very cold during winter. She was showing me some photos of her home and her family's homes and I noticed these beautiful rugs on the walls. These oriental style rugs are brightly colored mostly rich jeweltones that cover the wall they are hung on. I asked her about them and she told me that they are hung not only for their beautiful looks but to keep the cold out. They act as added insulation. She said that they are important not only for looks but as a shield against the weather. I was surprised but intrigued with the look they gave to the room. They look so warm and inviting! If I were to come across the right rug at the right price it would surely be hanging on my wall before long.
     
  19. MoonShine

    MoonShine Fire On The Mountain

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    When I think of old country decor...a few things that come to mind...
    Oil lamps
    Hook rugs
    Baskets(wooden and weaved)
    Cookie cutters and any other type of "rustic" kitchen stuff..like potato mashers and stuff like that..
    Glass milk bottles
    Metal buckets

    Things that were useful added to the decor. Have you ever googled "primitive" or "rustic" crafts? People pay money for old rusty mason jars and things that look very used. I was in antique/craft store awhile back and they were selling old empty Bag Balm cans for $8! I guess that's a look people want,to imitate country living or more basic living.