Homestead cow , don't over look a beefer

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Patty0315, Mar 29, 2005.

  1. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    I am milking a black baldy. She is a first freshener with decent size teats. I am getting 4-5 gallons a day.

    Being beef she is not huge like a holestein and does not give 100lb a day. But she gives all we need plus enough for butter and to feed back to a few calves.

    Just a thought for all of you looking , don't over look a gentle beef cow. Plus side is you will have a better meat animal in her off spring.
     
  2. allenslabs

    allenslabs Saanen & Boer Breeder

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    Yeah I've heard the herefords are gentle which I guess being a black baldy she must be a herford cross. I know if I tried to milk any of my angus nuts they'd try to kill me!! OLOL!! Isn't it amazing that there is that big a difference in breeds?
     

  3. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    I second that, herefords would make for a good homsteader. Except, if yours are as fuzzy on the udder as some of mine, break out the trimmer! Some of mine have Jersey in their blood, and their udder is not hairy. But they do give enough, and as far as health? They are VERY hardy.


    Jeff
     
  4. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi Patty,
    I milk a Herford/Friesian which is what I think you call a black baldy - white face, white brisket, stomach, udder and lower legs and black over the body. She is as quiet as they come and moves like the proverbial slow boat to China. I doubt there is an evil bone in her body. She is a big producer but not so hot on the cream but produces enough of it for the average family. For me she is one of six so her cream content isn't an issue. Yes, a good choice for the small farmer as is the Hereford/Jersey - looks like the black baldy except they are a red brindle but every bit as docile.

    The only problem seems to be that as they get older their udders become pendulous and low slung with the front quarters higher than the back which makes for uneven milking if using a machine and therefore a greater risk of mastitis.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  5. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    Milking machine ??????????????????????? What that we are to poor I milk by hand :waa: I have a machine set for goats we have to see if we can adjust it for cows, that would be nice. I have a black jersey and an angus to freshen yet.

    What we call a black baldy up her is a herferd / holestein cross. Proberly a holestein heifer bred to a herford for first time calving ease. We bred her to our jersey bull and got the cutest bull calve out of her.

    She did try having an attitude problem yesterday , but tying here head for an hour solved that ,sweet as pie to milk last night! But in general she has been great easy to milk without a lot of fuss. The first 2 days we tied her and after that I wiould just put her grain down.
     
  6. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    I guess most eveyone here knows that I milk Jerseys, and while I have have had some bad luck with my Milking Devons, but I will be milking them; eventually.

    It seems to me that there are cultures out and about milking everything from camels to sheep to Zebus, and a "black baldy" whether Hereford on Angus, or Holstein on Hereford ain't nothing but another choice.

    I believe that a person could milk any cow that has been trained to stand for it. My brother used to milk a full Angus cow. Folks living in his environ used to talk about him milking a buffalo.
     
  7. JanO

    JanO Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think your right Haggis. I raised a nice little angus hiefer that turned into our family milk cow. She wasn't too good in the volume or cream department, but she gave enought for a family of 6. I got a nice little brangus hiefer out of her that was a nice milker too... although she took a lot of work to settle down and stand for milking.
     
  8. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    I posted milking my black baldy as an option . With the price of full blooded jersy or holesteins it is out of manys reach.
     
  9. melwynnd

    melwynnd living More with Less!

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    We had a lovely angus cow that we raised on a bottle when I was a little girl. We used to ride her and make her pull our wagon. Her name was Tag-a-long. When she got older, we milked her and put orphan calves on her.

    Even after she'd been with the herd for years, we could still go out and do anything we wanted with her. She finally died when she was 18. Had a calf every year until then. Beef cows can definitely make great family cows, but it's lots easier if you raise them on the bottle. They don't seem to realize they are cows then..... :haha:
     
  10. jerzeygurl

    jerzeygurl woolgathering

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    yes last two times we have bred our jerseys to angus, we have 2 of those heifers for sale. imagine that they would be perfect for homesteaders cause they could be bred back to beef and have nice beefy calves.
     
  11. unioncreek

    unioncreek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think the perfect homestead cow is a beef breed crossed with a milking breed. One of the retired county extension agents in WA had this cross and he breeds them every year and grafts two other calves on them. So he is selling 3 calves a year off a cow. If you would want milk I would do this, but not graft any other calves on them. Milk the cow in the morning or evening then turn the calf in for half a day or whenever you don't need milk.

    Bobg