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According to this news article, these homes have been without water for weeks, even if they have money to drill deeper wells the businesses are backlogged for years. To me, this is a dire situation...but it is the woman trying to help her neighbors that brought me to tears. She is 71 years old, has no water in her home, yet helps her neighbors. Say what you will about end times, I pray I rise to the occasion.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/11/us/california-drought-homes-without-running-water/index.html?hpt=hp_c2
 

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Droughts are bad.

It seems like every year we read about towns in various parts of the nation, where the town well has gone dry.

I am originally from California. In the town where my foster-parents live, every year various wells go dry, in a sequence. They are pretty used to it by now. They know which farm's well will go dry next, every year.
 

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Droughts are bad.

It seems like every year we read about towns in various parts of the nation, where the town well has gone dry.

I am originally from California. In the town where my foster-parents live, every year various wells go dry, in a sequence. They are pretty used to it by now. They know which farm's well will go dry next, every year.
I just cannot imagine how people are going to survive without water for years. But I also love that people are coming together.
 

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I was amazed at the way the one guy was filling his water jugs from what the reporter called a "huge tank." First, the guy let the jug overflow...hasn't it set in that water is precious?

Second, that tank is not huge. Looked to be about 5,000 gallons...not much water for a bunch of families to share, especially if they're still wasting it.

Third, the reporter seems to think that connecting to government water lines is the ultimate solution, but will take years. It will help in the short term if they all get hooked up eventually, but certainly won't solve the problem. The government pipes have to get the water from somewhere too.

Negatives aside, you're right...that woman is great...and she looks good for 71!
 

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Nice of the lady to buy water. Well our government is providing water. I would think when that stops people pack what they want and have to move on. Might be the problem with a lot of people deciding to live in a desert area that never really had that many people living on the land from the beginning of time. We built communities out in the desert, we built communities in what was swamp Fla. And they have sink holes and flooding because of filled in wet lands. The land will go back to what it once was right?
 

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Might be the problem with a lot of people deciding to live in a desert area that never really had that many people living on the land from the beginning of time.........The land will go back to what it once was right?
Yep...one could live on the moon.... IF you have enough artificial life support.

Desert communities strike me the same way....if all that lived there before was cactus, lizards and tumbleweed, it's probably not a place you really want to try to live.....because if the electric power and water stops, it ain't all that great a place to live.
 

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So we live in Southern Oregon, the drought is not as bad as California, but the lack of snow pack and the natural cycle of no rain from May through September is a factor in our moving back to Maine. Aging family is the main reason, but I look at the maps there and see so much water, so many lakes and ponds, and it actually rains in the summer! Makes my heart sing.
 

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I grew up in Michigan surrounded by the Great Lakes and spent most of my first career in the Caribbean where it rains a LOT, so water was always very plentiful...then when I retired I moved to Montana. It's very dry compared to what I'm used to, but nowhere near as dry as the lower west coast and the southwest. I'm in the process of selling my ranch and haven't decided where I will go next, but water is a big part of the decision. I've considered Nevada, and there are places where there's enough water to survive there, but I don't think I'm up to the challenge. Easy access to water is a great luxury.
 
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