homemade oil stain

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by karlie sherk, Sep 17, 2004.

  1. karlie sherk

    karlie sherk New Member

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    We want to make our own oil stain and can't seem to find a recipe. So far we have the linseed oil, turpentine, mineral spirits, and thats about it. Any help would be appreciated! Karlie
     
  2. dscott7972

    dscott7972 Well-Known Member

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    No, and I think its great your trying to make your own product. If your doing it only to save money call some local painters, I'd be glad to get rid of stains and paints we have left over on jobs and have stored. Its getting harder and harder to get rid of this stuff and our county/city solid waiste facility recently went belly up.
     

  3. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    Oh heck... if you're doing it only to save money, and you're staining the outside of a building, NOTHING beats old motor oil. Slather it on until the wood won't take any more and watch the water bead away. Beats Thompson's hollow.
     
  4. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    I once saw a homemade recipe for log cabins. I remember it had the ingredients that you listed.....plus borax. I'll try to find it.
     
  5. ed/IL

    ed/IL Well-Known Member

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  6. dscott7972

    dscott7972 Well-Known Member

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    Anything beats Thompson!!!
     
  7. sherwood

    sherwood Active Member

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    Wisconsin
    USDA-developed Wood Preservative

    The following wood-preservative recipe was developed by the USDA’s Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) to protect wood used above ground for up to 20 years (Moore, 1993). The preservative was not tested for in-ground use (MacMillen, 1995), but is “safe for wood used in the ground — that is, it won’t leach toxic chemicals into your garden soil — and the wood will last longer than if left untreated” (Rodale, Inc., 2001). In the 2002 BIRC article “Moisture Management to Prevent Wood Decay,” the authors state:

    Unfortunately, the FPL’s water repellent is not satisfactory for the Pacific Northwest or the southeastern areas of the U.S where warm temperatures and high humidity create optimal conditions for fungi. In these climates, or where wood is in contact with moist soil, addition of a copper-based chemical such as copper-8-quinolinolate [See *Note, next page] to the FPL’s water repellent can be tried. (Daar and Olkowski, 2002)

    The original recipe calls for using paraffin wax, a petroleum derivative that is prohibited under the NOP section 205.105 (c), but a substitute like carnauba or wood rosin wax may work as well. Remember that before using this or any recipe, it is necessary to make sure that all the ingredients are listed on the National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances as NOSB approved, or are approved by your organic certifiers.

    Ingredients:

    1½ cups boiled linseed oil
    1 ounce of paraffin (substitute carnauba or wood rosin wax, provided they contain no
    prohibited substances)
    Enough solvent (distilled pine tar, mineral spirits, paint thinner, turpentine, citrus
    thinner, or whatever is approved) at room temperature to make the total volume of the mix one full gallon.


    Directions:
    Melt the paraffin over water in a double boiler. Do not heat over a direct flame. Away from the heat source, stir the solvent vigorously, and then slowly stir in the melted paraffin. Add the linseed oil and continue to stir thoroughly. Apply by dipping the untreated lumber in the mixture for three minutes or by brushing a heavy application across the wood’s grain and on the cut ends of the lumber. The wood can be painted when it’s thoroughly dry.

    Cautions and suggestions:

    This solution is flammable, so all mixing should be done outdoors. Wear gloves, avoid breathing the vapors, and avoid contact with face and eyes. The mixture may separate when cool; if so, just warm it to room temperature and stir. Like many other finishes, it may need to be reapplied every few years. The wood can be painted when the finish is thoroughly dry.
     
  8. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

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    one of my neighbors made his own creation to cover his log home.

    He mixed drain oil and fuel oil......and covered his log home with it.


    And yes.....it looks just as gruesome as you think it does......maybe worse!!
     
  9. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member

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    I cook up polkberries, linseed or vegetable oil and borax to make stain for my lattice sided garage panels.
     
  10. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    how about a solvent and some trany fluid it will give the wood a redish tint i know some people that use it on teak wood looks pretty nice
     
  11. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

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    black walnut hulls and turpentine , dark stain , lasts forever