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You don't need an academy to teach you how to plant or plan a garden. Does your academy or your neighborhood have a library?

This site can give you a lot of information.


You would benefit from learning as much as you can before the academy starts the actual gardening program.

What about cooking simple meals? Will your dad help you learn the basics of food preparation?
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
You don't need an academy to teach you how to plant or plan a garden. Does your academy or your neighborhood have a library?

This site can give you a lot of information.


You would benefit from learning as much as you can before the academy starts the actual gardening program.

What about cooking simple meals? Will your dad help you learn the basics of food preparation?
I know but my group home requires it. No. Not at the moment. He's too busy with his software business. Thank You for the link, I'll check it out after I make a post about caring for a Beef and Dairy Cow.
 

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When you make your first meal with plants you have grown, you can say you are a beginning gardener. When you are eating your first animal that you have raised and butchered, you can say you are on your way to becoming self-sufficient. When you have shelves of food that you have grown, harvested and preserved, you can say you are a homesteader.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
When you make your first meal with plants you have grown, you can say you are a beginning gardener. When you are eating your first animal that you have raised and butchered, you can say you are on your way to becoming self-sufficient. When you have shelves of food that you have grown, harvested and preserved, you can say you are a homesteader.
Not only that but your pantry and root cellar is your personal supermarket. What you put in your personal supermarket is up to you, the garden, the livestock and the seasons.
 

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Look at it this way. You have an empty pantry. You need to stock that pantry with something. You can fill your pantry with store bought food and still have a personal supermarket. You can buy food at a farmer's market and preserve it yourself and still have a personal supermarket. That is prepping. You have your supplies set back so that you don't have to go to the store for a while. Only when you have grown that food yourself and processed it yourself, can you really be considered a homesteader. The difference is taking the product from seed to shelf by your actions.

I know lots of people who buy bulk foods at produce auctions and take that food home and process it. I know lots of people who raise their own food but never preserve it for eating later. I know lots of people who buy preserved food from the grocery store and have a supply of several months worth of grocery store food. None of those are quite the same as someone who has completed the cycle of growing, harvesting, preserving and eating their own crops. It is a lot of work to follow through all the steps.

It takes a lot of land to grow enough food to feed yourself and your family from harvest to harvest. There will be crop failures. Frost may kill the peach flowers. Raccoons may ruin a lot of your sweet corn. Your cows may get out and eat your beans. These are things homesteaders try to prepare for and keep enough foods so they always have something to eat. You may end up eating raccoon but you will have food on the table.

According to some people, even my grandparents weren't really homesteaders. Most of our food came from the land. We spent weeks preserving foods we had grown. There were several months worth of food in the cellar. But they bought chicks from the hatchery every year and the chickens were fed foods not grown on the property.
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
I
Look at it this way. You have an empty pantry. You need to stock that pantry with something. You can fill your pantry with store bought food and still have a personal supermarket. You can buy food at a farmer's market and preserve it yourself and still have a personal supermarket. That is prepping. You have your supplies set back so that you don't have to go to the store for a while. Only when you have grown that food yourself and processed it yourself, can you really be considered a homesteader. The difference is taking the product from seed to shelf by your actions.

I know lots of people who buy bulk foods at produce auctions and take that food home and process it. I know lots of people who raise their own food but never preserve it for eating later. I know lots of people who buy preserved food from the grocery store and have a supply of several months worth of grocery store food. None of those are quite the same as someone who has completed the cycle of growing, harvesting, preserving and eating their own crops. It is a lot of work to follow through all the steps.

It takes a lot of land to grow enough food to feed yourself and your family from harvest to harvest. There will be crop failures. Frost may kill the peach flowers. Raccoons may ruin a lot of your sweet corn. Your cows may get out and eat your beans. These are things homesteaders try to prepare for and keep enough foods so they always have something to eat. You may end up eating raccoon but you will have food on the table.

According to some people, even my grandparents weren't really homesteaders. Most of our food came from the land. We spent weeks preserving foods we had grown. There were several months worth of food in the cellar. But they bought chicks from the hatchery every year and the chickens were fed foods not grown on the property.
I fully understand. I will decide what foods and drinks I want to put in my personal supermarket. That's why I love homesteading. I can be both producer and consumer. The encyclopedia have recipes I want to taste before I include it in my personal supermarket. I promise to allow the garden, livestock and seasons decide what I can put in my personal supermarket. Who needs albertson's or Kroger when you have your own homestead?
 

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I guarantee that once you have eaten truly fresh and ripe produce you will not want a lot of the stuff sold in Kroger or Albertson's. Tomatoes and strawberries are not supposed to be crunchy.
 

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Do you know how to make instant pudding? Can you make hard boiled eggs? Can you make a hot meat, egg and cheese sandwich using deli meat and presliced cheese? Can you assemble a salad from prepaged ingredients? Can you make a toasted cheese sandwich using presliced cheese?

It's not all that hard. There are many simple, and some complex, meals you can make without cutting one ingredient. I can make a good taco salad without cutting anything.
 
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