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There are quite a few areas in the vicinity of Columbus, OH where there is an abundance of unoccupied office buildings. These are large, well-built buildings that could be converted into shelters as well as low income/affordable apartments. These buildings are in some of the safest parts of the city/suburbs, located on/near the bus lines, in good school districts (not Columbus City), and there are also plenty of job opportunities in many industries in these areas as well. Because these buildings are in office parks, thus not abutting some HOA subdivision where folks could complain, I would think the community would look favorably on this. Not sure how letting these large, empty buildings remain unoccupied is lining anyone’s pockets.
And those buildings belong to somebody, they are private property, the community doesn't have anything to say about it. If you gave the buildings over to the homeless, within six weeks they would be trashed beyond repair.
 

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Homelessness and drug addiction are tow separate problems.

Drug addicts are not homeless. They are addicts and until that is removed housing them is a waste of time.

The homeless need to be helped. I know that in the two areas I have lived in in the last 20 years, most cheap housing has been torn down. That is a problem.

I have two members of my extended family that are drug addicts. Until THEY decide to change, nothing will change them. It is sadder than I can express.
(Oh, and BTW. I believe that when drug dealers are spotted, they should be knelt down, shot in the back of the head, and left there for a week, and that is the nice version of what I think should happen)
If their were no addicts, the drugs dealers would be out of business. They are all killing themselves slowly, too slowly I think.
 

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Get rid of demand, the dealers will fold up shop. Instead of destroying seized drugs, lace it with arsenic and put it back on the streets. Less demand, fewer dealers, fewer homeless.
 

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Get rid of demand, the dealers will fold up shop. Instead of destroying seized drugs, lace it with arsenic and put it back on the streets. Less demand, fewer dealers, fewer homeless.
Or just decriminalize it. That way, while there may be a market, the dealers and drug lords will not have a place in it.
 

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Someone gave him permission to speak for everyone else. Not sure who
He does have a tendency to be condescending in his posts. Kind of a mansplainer. No offense to men who don’t patronize others in their posts.
 

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Well, enforcement strategies imposed upon people have notoriously poor results in addressing homelessness. Fines don't mean a lot to people with nothing left to lose, and incarceration is much more expensive for society than other solutions that require the consent of the homeless.

As a society we have a strong tendency to want to sit in judgement on the less fortunate, to point out their situation is their own darn fault, and to posit that only if they acted like us, they would be fine. The reality is that this does nothing to really solve either the problem of the homeless person, or the problem of communities and citizens that are inconvenienced.

For some reason, we seem to be willing to spend more on cops and jails than treatment, alterative housing, social supports, income supports, all the things that help people move from homelessness to more stable situations. There has been this socialization where "Joe Taxpayer" figures that if an addict gets treatment, a poor person gets food stamps, or someone in crisis gets counselling, that they are somehow getting over on us.

If we could get past these mindsets and invest in supports that address the actual individual needs of people experiencing homelessness, both we and they would benefit many times over.
Inconvenienced?
Is that what you call being assaulted, raped, chased, harassed, losing your business, used needles all over parks diminished and property values?
 

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Discussion Starter · #132 ·
I was able to pull some great information out of all your comments ... thanks, all! My design is actually ready to put into proposal form. Many of your good ideas will go into it as well ...

To summarize my original solution, which was a car/camping site:
  • it helps those who can be helped (upwards of 30%?)
  • it gives a legal leg up to cities, as there is a defined spot for homeless support; if doing any of the illegal things elsewhere, the city can and should come down hard on them (upwards of 70%?); this would include the drugs, alcohol, and such crowd, whom most think won't want help.
Other solutions included: converting existing/unused buildings, pointers to approaches like Austin's proposed camp site, Portland's "homeless villages", and so on. Beyond the "new" approaches, there are multitudes of "help" approaches, like housing first, etc. ... many organizations and programs exist to help, if those in need and desiring help can find and get to them.

Ban- or law-wise, many cities have all kinds of bans, and put forth all kinds of efforts to roust the problem out of the city.

I think that summarizes most everything ... it was an eye-opening thread ... thanks again!
 

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Salt Lake City is building a tiny home village with shops and Airbnbs to address the homelessness crisis—
 

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“To create this community feel, the village will have communal spaces that surround these neighborhoods, including a garden, dog park, and community center, according to renderings of the village.”


I wonder what they will do when these areas are filled up by other homeless and thus create a unsafe environment for the ones living in the tiny homes. I assume this will be ok since its the method currently being practiced.
 

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With everything rules need to apply. Drug uses your out. At least one person in the home Having to work and pay rent. The show United States of Tents has a good setup in Hawaii cost millions to set up build infrastructure its for families with children for the most part. They do have to work and pay rent. The project does not pay for itself so money is needed. The projects developer believe breaking the chain of homeless needs to start with the children. In the show it has both a working system and the non working tent city right next to a vacation area.
 
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I was able to pull some great information out of all your comments ... thanks, all! My design is actually ready to put into proposal form. Many of your good ideas will go into it as well ...

To summarize my original solution, which was a car/camping site:
  • it helps those who can be helped (upwards of 30%?)
  • it gives a legal leg up to cities, as there is a defined spot for homeless support; if doing any of the illegal things elsewhere, the city can and should come down hard on them (upwards of 70%?); this would include the drugs, alcohol, and such crowd, whom most think won't want help.
Other solutions included: converting existing/unused buildings, pointers to approaches like Austin's proposed camp site, Portland's "homeless villages", and so on. Beyond the "new" approaches, there are multitudes of "help" approaches, like housing first, etc. ... many organizations and programs exist to help, if those in need and desiring help can find and get to them.

Ban- or law-wise, many cities have all kinds of bans, and put forth all kinds of efforts to roust the problem out of the city.

I think that summarizes most everything ... it was an eye-opening thread ... thanks again!
I rem,ember when they had these same problems in NYC

They wasted money on some of the same "solutions" proposed here

The problems were only "solved" when Giuliani made law, order, and personal responsibility the way to run the city.

Now those principles have been thrown to the side and we have lawlessness. Shock!

Drug addicts are not homeless people.
 
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