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Are they?

I'd suggest tortured
That may be. but if they’ve rejected a way out of addiction or illness, then that’s on them.
not that I’d abandon them or society at large. Those are the ones who should be at a mental health or addiction recovery centers. Or whatever they’d call them.
 

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That may be. but if they’ve rejected a way out of addiction or illness, then that’s on them.
not that I’d abandon them or society at large. Those are the ones who should be at a mental health or addiction recovery centers. Or whatever they’d call them.
I think they are incapable of breaking addiction, flotsam
 

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If I was Mayor.

Homeless people don't get to make the rules.
Advocates for homeless people don't get to make the rules.
Homeless people shall follow the rules,
Homeless people who violate the rules will get arrested.
Sounds good on paper. How many extra holding cells does your jail have? How’s your grocery budget? My dad recalled when a fair sized group of homeless had camped along the river, were stealing cattle to eat During the depression. County could not feed them due to lack of funds. No arrests could be made. Solution? Cattleman’s association stepped in, donated beef. Thefts stopped.
 

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One of the keys to getting people off the street is location. They are in those cities because they want to be there. Otherwise, they would take a bus ticket to move on. The services used to move them from street to a home need to be based where they are. Moving them to camps or army or air force bases in other places is not conducive to integrating them into the places they want to live.

It is far cheaper in the long run to solve the problems that are the reason they are on the street for those that you can.
Thats what real estate is all about.
Location, location, location.
Not everyone gets to live where they want because they can’t afford it. Meaning most people.
California, Portland, Spokane, Seattle, NY, Austin, Miami, etc. All high price cities. Why should the homeless get to live in cities that hard working people can’t afford to live in, just because they want to.
 

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STILL not Alice
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My thoughts:

There are many, many of congregations, of many different belief systems, enjoying tax-free status. Since most religions espouse helping others, how about each congregation takes a few homeless/down on their luck folks, and commits to helping them get into a higher functioning place in the world?
 

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My thoughts:

There are many, many of congregations, of many different belief systems, enjoying tax-free status. Since most religions espouse helping others, how about each congregation takes a few homeless/down on their luck folks, and commits to helping them get into a higher functioning place in the world?
 
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SM Entrepreneuraholic
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Sounds good on paper. How many extra holding cells does your jail have? How’s your grocery budget? My dad recalled when a fair sized group of homeless had camped along the river, were stealing cattle to eat During the depression. County could not feed them due to lack of funds. No arrests could be made. Solution? Cattleman’s association stepped in, donated beef. Thefts stopped.
Civics lesson: We have a representative government. We elect city council members who are to handle the affairs of the city. They are not doing their job. If I was Mayor, I would force the issue and put the responsibility exactly where it belongs - City Council.
 

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STILL not Alice
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Thats what real estate is all about.
Location, location, location.
Not everyone gets to leave where they want because they can’t afford it. Meaning most people.
California, Portland, Spokane, Seattle, NY, Austin, Miami, etc. All high price cities. Why should the homeless get to live in cities that hard working people can’t afford to live in, just because they want to.
Exactly. Not having housing that hard working can afford is why many become homeless . The beginning of the cycle that creates a good portion of homelessness. Affordable housing essential to reversing the cycle for that portion of the workforce.
 

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That may be. but if they’ve rejected a way out of addiction or illness, then that’s on them.
not that I’d abandon them or society at large. Those are the ones who should be at a mental health or addiction recovery centers. Or whatever they’d call them.
There are not near enough facilities to cover them.
 

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Exactly. Not having housing that hard working can afford is why many become homeless . The beginning of the cycle that creates a good portion of homelessness. Affordable housing essential to reversing the cycle for that portion of the workforce.
There is affordable housing. It's just not always where some want to live. Some cities are just too expensive for some people.
 

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Sorry, I don’t really have the answers, but a little experience. Most has been touched on already.
We used to live in an urban area south of Milwaukee. My wife volunteered at our local homeless shelter, and it was eye opening. The majority of the people there were there by choice. She estimates about 1/2 were mentally ill and/or drunks or addicted. Some people would rather live on the street and not have the responsibility of a place to keep or bills to keep track of, even if it’s given to them. It’s just a hassle and another thing they have to be responsible for.
I remember the story she told me of one of the other volunteers going to the bank with one of the people in the shelter. He had $18,000 in his bank account, but chose to be homeless. It’s just the way he was. He didn’t want his own place.
I think Tom Horn mentioned it, but you can’t help someone who doesn’t want to help themselves. Same goes for the drunks and addicts. I don’t think we’ll ever see 100% homelessness.
 

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Sorry, I don’t really have the answers, but a little experience. Most has been touched on already.
We used to live in an urban area south of Milwaukee. My wife volunteered at our local homeless shelter, and it was eye opening. The majority of the people there were there by choice. She estimates about 1/2 were mentally ill and/or drunks or addicted. Some people would rather live on the street and not have the responsibility of a place to keep or bills to keep track of, even if it’s given to them. It’s just a hassle and another thing they have to be responsible for.
I remember the story she told me of one of the other volunteers going to the bank with one of the people in the shelter. He had $18,000 in his bank account, but chose to be homeless. It’s just the way he was. He didn’t want his own place.
I think Tom Horn mentioned it, but you can’t help someone who doesn’t want to help themselves. Same goes for the drunks and addicts. I don’t think we’ll ever see 100% homelessness.
We will never see 100 percent homeowners either!!!
 
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