Home remedy for roaches.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by martenfisher, Apr 25, 2011.

  1. martenfisher

    martenfisher Well-Known Member

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    Is there any home remedy for roaches like some kind of bait or something? I live in a trailer park and my neighbors and myself seem to be have roaches all of a sudden. Mine are mainly behind the stove and under the kitchen sink. You don't see them until night and they are on my counters at night. Not good at all. The seem to like my drains also.
    What to do without going toxic? The stores have baits but I would like to mix up somthing if i can.
     
  2. demeter

    demeter Well-Known Member

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    I wish I knew. This house was alive with roaches when we moved in. We tried everything known to man I'm sure, but wound up hiring the pros. That was 15+ years ago and the roaches haven't been back since.

    Demeter
     

  3. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    Mix a tablespoon of sugar with 1/4 tablespoon of either Borax or Boric Acid.
    Add enough water to make a paste and leave it where they canfind it
     
  4. jen74145

    jen74145 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    After moving into an INFESTED apartment, doing all the natural stuff (and spending I don't know how much), and taking the buggers with me when we bought a house?

    I bombed. Cried tears of relief when I had no more bugs.
     
  5. FarmerRob

    FarmerRob Well-Known Member

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    DE, aka Diatomaceous Earth. Must be food grade.

    You can order some from here: http://perma-guard.com/index.html

    DE is microscopic fossilized diatoms, (a one celled plant.) You wouldn't want to put a handful in your eye or nose but otherwise it won't pose a danger to you, kids or pets but it will kill anything with an exoskeleton (roaches, ants, etc.)

    Many people use DE mixed in with the food they feed livestock to worm them. People raising chickens and quail, etc. sometimes add it to their dust baths to help kill mites and such.

    If this is just more than the budget can afford there is always boric acid. That is the active ingredient in many roach kill powders. I knew someone who moved into a house that turned out to be infested. She made a mixture of boric acid, flour and sugar and kneaded it into a putty and then put it all the places the roaches were going. It took a while but eventually she got them under control. This mixture is NOT safe for pets and kids. If you go this route wear heavy rubber gloves while mixing and applying.
     
  6. deaconjim

    deaconjim Appalachian American Supporter

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    I used to own a pest control company, so I've had some experiences in this area (and I could tell you some horror stories).

    It is extremely important to keep water away from them. Roaches can eat almost anything, including things that aren't normally considered food, but they must have water which is why they like your drains. Don't leave even a drop of water on the counters or in the sinks overnight, and plug your drains.

    Baits work quite well, especially the gel type baits. Put it in areas where you know they frequent, and near water sources.

    Once you kill off all the roaches, continue putting out the bait for a couple of months because they will have laid eggs that will hatch. If you resort to sprays, try to find something with an Insect Growth Regulator, which prevents the immature stages from developing further. Most flea foggers include an IGR.

    One good way to reduce the population fairly quickly is to use a vacuum cleaner to suck them up. You'll never get all of them this way, but it will give you a good head start.
     
  7. martenfisher

    martenfisher Well-Known Member

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    Funny you mention water. The drain was leaking under the sink and my wife never told me. I almost never go under there. She does every day and never noticed all the wet wood. I pulled everything out to dry it.

     
  8. martenfisher

    martenfisher Well-Known Member

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    I am going to see what the borax does. I tried the boric acid powder they sell for roaches and it has been a month and it does not seem to have done anything.
     
  9. Jenn

    Jenn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We are distant from other homes and mostly only have palmetto bugs that get in. But we have decreased the number of these by leaving borax (20 mule team, nice and cheap) under all the sinks, on the thresholds from attics into home (where we rarely go), and behind our furniture against the wall/under beds etc. Figure they have to cross it to get to water or into the house and it deters them/ cuts off their water supply.
     
  10. City Bound

    City Bound Male Supporter

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    yeah, they like wet slightly decomposed foods, paper, and wood. They naturally live under the moist layer of dead leaves that litter the jungle floors....that is the envirnment they like. I think they are some sort of composting bug.

    I used those sticky trays to catch them and then dumped them. the trays worked well. I used borax also, but not with sugar as a bait, I ran a line of it across areas i didnt want them to cross and it worked, they didnt want to cross the lines. From what I read borax is an irritant to bugs and rodants, like tiny razor sharp shards of glass., and when it brushes their exoskeliton it is like getting fiberglass on your skin for us. if you have ever installed fiberglass insulation and got it on your skin, you know how irritating and painful it can be, even after a shower.

    Dont leave food scraps in the sink, they really, really love that. Find any damp dark areas and figure out how to take the moisture out....maybe add charcoal to the area to suck up the moisture.

    Sometimes, I just catch them in a tissue and flush them down the toilet.

    Death to the evil roaches!
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2011
  11. martenfisher

    martenfisher Well-Known Member

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    Some of my neighbors have them so bad you don't want to go in their homes. One of my neighbors had them so bad it looked like beehives on their walls and you could smell them. When I see the roaches I think of that and no way want that to happen in my home. My wife told me she saw some in the cat food.
    I think I am getting borax and putting that stuff everywhere.
     
  12. bywaterdog

    bywaterdog Well-Known Member

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    I am a 9th generation New Orleanian and live in Roach Heaven.

    The climate of New Orleans is humid subtropical with short, mild winters and hot, humid summers. In January, morning lows average around 43 °F. In July, highs average 91 F. The average precipitation is 64.2 inches.
    Roaches can live outside, never die, and they can fly!

    A simple safe method that I use is to rub shortening (or cooking spray) on the inside of a large can -coffee,#10 food,or even a plastic container will work. Then pour some sweet soda pop (about 1/2 inch in the bottom, place this in an out of the way area and it will start killing roaches the first night.Leave the dead roaches in the can as their smell will draw more roaches to the trap.This is not pretty, dd says "its so gross daddy", but this method is cheap, safe, inexpensive, and effective.
    I just don't like poision in my house if I can help it.
    Hope this helps.
     
  13. cindy71

    cindy71 Well-Known Member

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    Are you talking about the big water bugs or the German Roach?
     
  14. bywaterdog

    bywaterdog Well-Known Member

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    I've found this works with both. "Palmetto bugs" and the German/indoor types.
     
  15. deaconjim

    deaconjim Appalachian American Supporter

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    Insects, including roaches, have an exoskelton that has a waxy coating. They breath through holes in the exoskeleton. The boric acid scratches off the waxy coating, and if enough is scraped off, they will die from dehydration before they can regenerate the coating. Anything that clogs the holes in the exoskeleton will also kill them, such as soapy water or petroleum products.

    The trick to killing them is to put the boric acid in a place where they have to crawl through it. Rather than a pile, dust it in a light coating in places they might be. DE works in the same way.

    The American Cockroach, which people often call Palmetto bugs, are really an outdoor pest that will occasionally come inside. They rarely infest a home like the German cochroach or the Brown-banded cockroach. The do like leaves, etc. in flower beds, so it is advisable to remove any leaves from the flower beds around your home.

    I understand the desire to not use poisons in your home, but if you do feel you need to go that route, you can do so sparingly and still get good effects. I recommend a wettable powder type product if you can get it. Put a line across the threshold of your doors to kill those that are coming from outside. Use a small amount around any sources of water that they have access to, as well as around and under the refridgerator (they get water from the condensation).
     
  16. Randy Rooster

    Randy Rooster Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I recommend this idea as well- I think when we have done it my wife used a bit of crisco in it along with powdered sugar - make it like a frosting - she would make little aluminum foil cups of it and put it in places where the animals couldnt get to it ut the roaches frequented- takes a few weeks but it definately works- dont skimp on the boric acid- we used the powdered kind you can get at the drug store.

    here are a couple of variations

    http://www.ehow.com/how_5363332_rid-roaches-naturally-chemicals.html
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2011
  17. mekasmom

    mekasmom Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The Bayer company makes a product with imadacloprid in it called Tree and Shrub. If you put it around the outside of the foundation of your home, you will not have roaches for months, months and months. I do it once a year, just put it in an old Ketchup type squirt bottle and lay a small line all around the house. It doesn't keep ants out quite as well as roaches, but it's better than other products. And we never have roaches. A bottle of the stuff lasts for years and years. Ours is probably 5yrs old or more.
    http://cooperseeds.com/images/tree_shrub_ins_cont.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2011
  18. the mama

    the mama loves all critters Supporter

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    They love warm places... so unplug small appliances like toasters or they will hide there. Leave no pet food or water out overnight. TRY not to leave dirty dishes in sink, if you must , then spray with a bleach solution. Keep dishwasher locked or it is a feasting place. Move out stove and cover floor with boric acid same for refrigerator, not a line but a covering. Also on top of kitchen cabinets. Use a fly swat and kill every one you see. Just think if it gets away, it will become 100s. Cedar oil repels them, also osage orange peels. Good luck.
     
  19. Harry Chickpea

    Harry Chickpea Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have taken movie theatres from roach infested places where if you turn on the lights the floor moves, to roach and rodent free within a couple weeks. The process is fairly simple. Go to a Home Despot or Low Store and buy a quart of boric acid powder for about $10. Get about ten of the bait traps. Get one can of a Bengal pyrethrum type aerosol spray (look at the precentages of pyrethrum and get a reasonably high percentage spray). Snip the top 1/2 inch off the tip of the boric acid container nozzle. Outside, and with the bottle upright, give it a shake and then squeeze the sides hard. You should see a light cloud of fine powder. Once you have mastered the technique and made the tip opening the size that works best for you, come on inside.

    Boric acid and borax are not particularly toxic to humans or pets, especially compared to the nerve chemicals used in some insecticides. Boron and the metabolism of insects are incompatible, so some people use borax or other boron based powders, but boric acid is cheap and works well. A bottle can last twenty years or more if you use it properly in a single house. It also decimates fleas if you brush the powder into carpets. (FWIW, Diatomaceous earth is the stuff that abrades the chitin exoskeleton of insects)

    Be warned that pyrethrum sprays dissipate over time and ARE DEADLY TO CATS. Pyrethrum disorients roaches and causes them to scurry about. That is the reason that exterminators sometimes seem to have made a roach problem worse when they first leave.

    The combination of surfaces covered in borax and sprays of pyrethrum works well because the roaches inevitably pick up the boron in their scurrying about.

    Roaches like heat, and they like moisture, and they like fetid material. If you use the boric acid around those places, you will halt just about any infestation. The very first spots to treat are the water heater, under the sinks, and any warm spots (usually from electricity). The socket behind a night light could have roaches. Unscrew the plate and gently dust the boric acid into the socket. Computers often harbor roaches. TV sets sometimes have them (don't take the back cover off a CRT computer monitor or tv, the high voltages can kill you). In cases like that, puff the boric acid on the surface the component rests on and don't dust for a week. Do your own seach for warm or wet places and apply the powder on or near the area.

    If you see an area with a lot of black dots of frass (roach poo), that is a hot spot. Use both a heavy application of the boric acid and some pyrethrum spray.

    Organic vegetables are a fantastic source of roaches. I recently was in a high-end market watching three roaches cavort over the carrots. Anything you bring in from a food store and ESPECIALLY a health food or natural food store is suspect. If the packaging has nooks and crannies, beware. washing vegetables immediately can flush out some buggies. A rule of thumb is to always freeze any grains, grits, or bulk items for at least three days to kill eggs.

    If you live in an apartment, you have to be especially mindful of the holes where plumbing enters or exits (those trim plates merely hide larger holes - you want to caulk those to seal them), wall sockets and switches (remove the plates and dust with boric acid) and door sweeps and joints (weatherstrip and lay a barrier of spray). Keep all edible food and pet food in sealed containers. Pasta goes out of boxes and into sealed containers upon arrival.

    99.99% of all roach infestations can be cleared with a good cleaning to remove frass and eggs, then proper application of boric acid and pyrethrum, and then placement of bait traps near the "hot" areas. The use of the more highly toxic chemicals is just not required.
     
  20. Joshie

    Joshie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Spread borax powder along the edges of your walls, especially in corners. You don't have to mix it in anything. They walk through the powder and carry it back to their nests. Check pricing in the roach killing department as well as the pharmacy area. It's also sold as eye wash.